Tag: Yanique Redwood

Racial Equity Impact Assessment: A Tool for Funders

By Yanique Redwood
President and CEO, Consumer Health Foundation

Consumer Health Foundation (CHF) is no stranger to racial equity. The foundation was born from Group Health Association, a healthcare cooperative founded in the 1930s to provide pre-paid healthcare to its members in racially integrated settings. Our institutional predecessor was acting on racial equity at a time when Jim Crow was still alive and well. This legacy compels us to continue pushing the envelope to ensure that our investments are truly impacting communities of color.

For the first time in our history, CHF now requires that potential grantee partners use a racial equity impact assessment (REIA) tool when applying for a grant. According to Race Forward, REIA is a systematic examination of how different racial and ethnic groups will likely be affected by a proposed action or decision. REIAs are used to minimize unanticipated adverse consequences in a variety of contexts, including the analysis of proposed policies, institutional practices, programs, plans and budgetary decisions. The REIA can be a vital tool for preventing racism and for identifying new options to remedy long-standing inequities.

In partnership with Western States Center and borrowing from existing tools, CHF has developed an REIA tool that can be found here. We trained our nonprofit partners to use the tool and then embedded the tool in our request for proposals. For the top three policy changes at the center of our partners’ advocacy efforts, we asked that they use the tool to aid in their racial equity analysis and discuss how their work might shift as a result of their intentional focus on racism.

We have gotten feedback from nonprofit organizations that have used the tool. Here is a sampling of what we have learned:

Using the tool required greater staff participation. Completing the proposal required the participation and interaction of program staff, executive directors and board members. Development staff could not complete the proposal alone. One organization hopes to engage its constituents in using the REIA tool moving forward.

The tool affirmed values. The tool helped organizations to put in writing what was in their heads and hearts. For one organization, the REIA tool helped their leadership to lift up, make visible and be explicit about its commitment to racial equity.

The tool was useful. The REIA tool provided an opportunity to examine the bigger picture and helped organizations to further develop their policy recommendations and define data needs. Some organizations reported slowing down, stepping back and looking at their work in new ways.

Using the tool was challenging. Many of the organizations said that it was challenging to use the tool. It was time consuming and, at times, daunting. Some were not sure how deep or how broad the responses should be.

The tool helped shift the focus to affected communities and root causes. Some questions provoked staff to think more about the communities that could be adversely affected by their policy recommendations. They also considered how they could assist communities in better understanding systems of power. The tool also pushed organizations to reflect deeply on root causes.

In addition, some organizations not only used the REIA tool in developing their proposals, they also shared it with their affiliates, partner organizations, board members and coalition members.

From this feedback, we gather that tools like these are pivotal in helping organizations to make the shift toward operationalizing racial equity. We will continue to refine the tool and make it less cumbersome and thus easier to use. We will also provide more opportunities for nonprofit organizations to practice using the tool. For funders interested in adapting the tool in their own grantmaking, CHF is available to help.

Rebranding the region

REGION
As part of the Roadmap effort, the 2030 Group has announced the hiring of global brand consultant Interbrand to develop a marketing campaign for the region that is expected to launch in early 2017 with the help of a rebranding working group (WBJ, 5/12):

The marketing campaign is part of a larger effort by the 2030 Group to identify weaknesses in the region’s economy and come up with ways to boost growth in a time of federal austerity. The organization has spearheaded working groups to explore affordable housing and how area colleges and universities can work more closely with the business community. A working group exploring a regional transportation authority has been suspended as Metro embarks on its yearlong effort to fix major problems, [2030 Group’s Bob] Buchanan said, although he still hopes to restart that conversation in the future.

Related: Last year, the 2030 Group’s Bob Buchanan and the Center for Regional Analysis’s Stephen Fuller undertook an extensive research project called, The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Future Economy, to recommend ways the region can reposition itself to remain competitive in the global economy. WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland also shared how philanthropy in the region might respond and collaborate with other sectors to meet challenges facing our communities. (Daily, 1/15)

COMMUNITY
– In light of the coming dissolution of the DC Trust, WRAG has submitted a letter on behalf of the region’s philanthropic community to D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson, calling on the Council to maintain funding for out-of-school and summer programming for D.C.’s  children and youth in the FY17 budget. Funders and advocates for children and youth will be watching closely as the DC Council votes on the proposed budget this month.

– BALLE (Business Alliance for Local Living Economies) recently named Consumer Health Foundation president and WRAG board member Yanique Redwood as one of 36 leaders in their 2016 BALLE Local Economy Fellowship. In this blog post, she discusses why she looks forward to working with other members of her cohort and continuing along a path toward community transformation. (Be a Localist, 5/12)

The Community Foundation for Northern Virginia has announced plans to create a $500,000 endowment for its Innovation Fund, following a $250,000 matching grant from an anonymous donor. They’ve also announced the launch of a new online-fundraising platform, Granted. (WBJ, 5/13)

FOOD 
– Prince Charitable Trusts presents a short film in their series about farming and food, titled The Culture of Collards, which recently  premiered at the DC Environmental Film Festival. The film traces the cultural heritage of collard greens from Portugal, to Africa, to the American south during the slave trade, up to their current state as a popular staple in many kitchens today. The 9-minute film features culinary historian Michael Twitty; owner of Three Part Harmony Farm in Northeast D.C. Gail Taylor; and City Blossoms co-founders Rebecca Lemos and Lola Bloom.

Related: In 2014, Michael Twitty kicked off WRAG’s Brightest Minds series with a discussion about building a more inclusive food movement. Check out this post that followed his talk, then take a look at the exciting lineup for WRAG’s Brightest Minds programs for the rest of the year. Brightest Minds programs are open to the public.

– The Ongoing Need for Healthy Food in Corner Stores (City Lab, 5/12)

EDUCATION
– As the acknowledgment of the importance of quality pre-k education in a student’s future success picks up steam across the country, some states continue to struggle with making these programs accessible to millions of children. Locally, D.C. made progress by serving more 3- and 4-year-olds than ever during the 2014-2015 school year. (WaPo, 5/12)

– The troubling shortage of Latino and black teachers — and what to do about it (WaPo, 5/15)


Which of the seven deadly sins do some of the most popular social networks represent? Pinterest is spot-on!

– Ciara

Friday roundup – April 18 through April 22, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG
 In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland discussed the progression of the Putting Racism on the Table series and how it’s about more than just learning. (Daily,4/21)

– Jessica Finkel, Philanthropy Fellow at Kaiser Permanente, shared how her experience working with the organization’s Community Benefit department helped her discover a passion for policy and public health. (Daily, 3/20)

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
Consumer Health Foundation president and WRAG board member Yanique Redwood discussed how marijuana-related incarcerations have devastated communities of color for years, citing points from WRAG’s recent Putting Racism on the Table session on mass incarceration, featuring speaker James Bell, J.D. of the W. Haywood Burns Institute. (CHF, 4/20)

Inter-American Development Bank launched a newly-revamped Improving Lives grants program, open to nonprofit organizations serving low-income Latin American and Caribbean communities in the Washington metropolitan area. The program will combine five grants of up to $50,000 each with skills-based volunteering, and is aimed at promoting innovative projects involving community and economic development, health and well-being, education or the arts. Eligible organizations in the region may apply for grants by submitting proposals before 6 pm (EST) May 19, 2016. For more information, please read the requirements or write to idbcommunityrelations@iadb.org.

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION/ECONOMY
– Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker spoke on his vision for making the jurisdiction a high-demand area for business in his recent State of the Economy address. (WBJ, 4/13)

– While Arlington County’s population continues to grow, the number of jobs continues to decline, according to recent data. (ARLnow, 4/20)

THIS WEEK IN THE WORKFORCE
Here are three key tools organizations in the social sector can use to build more diverse workplaces and address persistent institutional biases. (SSIR, 4/14)

 Lack of Training for Young Nonprofit Workers Means Too Few Potential Leaders (Chronicle, 4/19) Subscription required


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Can you remember these viral dance moves from the past ten years?

– Ciara

Exploring the five types of poverty

POVERTY/RACE
For years, researchers have attempted to better understand poverty by looking at the series of circumstances that allow it to persist, rather than attributing it to one defining factor. A new report hones in on five proposed types of poverty, and examines how these categories disproportionately affect Americans based on race. (City Lab, 4/16)

The paper, builds on research from the British economist William Beveridge, who in 1942 proposed five types of poverty: squalor, ignorance, want, idleness, and disease. In modern terms, these could be defined as poverty related to housing, education, income, employment, and healthcare, respectively. Analyzing the 2014 American Community Survey, the paper’s co-authors, Richard Reeves, Edward Rodrigue, and Elizabeth Kneebone, found that half of Americans experience at least one of these types of poverty, and around 25 percent suffer from at least two.

But the likelihood of living a life that includes more than one of these types of poverty is significantly higher for minorities.

– How American oligarchs created the concept of race to divide and conquer the poor (WaPo, 4/19)

– The Secret Shame of Middle-Class Americans (Atlantic, 4/18)

WRAG/PHILANTHROPY | Jessica Finkel, Philanthropy Fellow at Kaiser Permanente, shares how her experience working with the organization’s Community Benefit department has helped her uncover a passion for policy and public health. (Daily, 3/20)

Related for WRAG Members: We are currently accepting applications from WRAG members interested in hosting Philanthropy Fellows this fall. For more information about this program and how to apply, click here.

COMMUNITY/RACIAL EQUITY 
– Today is 4/20, also known as ‘National Weed Day’. While enthusiasts in a growing number of states may now be able to legally celebrate or profit from this day, Consumer Health Foundation president and WRAG board member Yanique Redwood uses this opportunity to discuss how marijuana-related incarcerations have devastated communities of color for years. She also cites points from WRAG’s recent Putting Racism on the Table session on mass incarceration, featuring speaker James Bell, J.D. of the W. Haywood Burns Institute. (CHF, 4/20)

PHILANTHROPY | The concept of “power” can often be a difficult one to navigate, as those who have it don’t always use it for good – or even at all. Exponent Philanthropy‘s Andy Carroll explains what bold power in action looks like in the world of philanthropy. (PhilanthroFiles, 4/19)

HEALTH
– The World Health Organization is expanding their focus on mental health, with hopes that more countries will also begin to view mental illness as a high priority global threat. (NPR, 4/13)

– Some states are passing religious freedom bills that provide protection to people of faith unwilling to provide goods or services to LGBT individuals, and these laws can also have severe consequences on how (and if) people seek care from physicians and therapists. (Atlantic, 4/19)

WORKFORCE | Lack of Training for Young Nonprofit Workers Means Too Few Potential Leaders (Chronicle, 4/19) Subscription required

EDUCATION
– See how high schools in the region stacked up on the 2016 U.S. News and World Report rankings of the country’s best high schools.

– Why America’s Schools Have A Money Problem (NPR, 4/18)


Views on dating have changed quite a bit since 1939.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – April 11 through April 15, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG
– We released the second video in the Putting Racism on the Table series, featuring Dr. Robin DiAngelo, former professor of education and author of What Does It Mean to be White?, speaking on white privilege. After viewing, we encourage you to share your thoughts on the series or on the specific topic via Twitter using the hashtag #PuttingRacismOnTheTable, or by commenting on WRAG’s Facebook page. We also suggest checking out the viewing guide and discussion guide to be used with the video. Both can be found on our website.

THIS WEEK IN PHILANTHROPY
 In an update to WRAG’s Beyond Dollars report originally published in 2009, former managing director Kristin Pauly of The Prince Charitable Trusts provided the latest on their efforts to help protect a cultural and environmental asset in Virginia, and presented a new documentary on the fight, When Mickey Came to Town. (Daily, 4/13)

Opinion: Public Welfare Foundation president and WRAG Board member Mary McClymont shed light on the need for long overdue reforms to the civil justice system, and the need for more foundations to support civil legal aid for vulnerable citizens. (Chronicle, 4/8)

– Consumer Health Foundation (CHF) president and WRAG Board member Yanique Redwood, and administrative and communications assistant Kendra Allen, shared how CHF has used learning journeys to further connect with their grantees and view their work from a different perspective. (NCRP, 4/7)

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION
– Editorial: The Washington Post took a look at recent violent crime occurring in the District’s wards 7 and 8, and the importance of tackling social issues that are often factors in crime. (WaPo, 4/11)

– Why Virginia is shaking up its economic development strategy (WBJ, 4/12)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


How did you know when you were officially an adult?

– Ciara

Income, geography, and shorter life expectancies

HEALTH/NATIONAL
A new study, based on the tax and Social Security records of everyone in the U.S. between 1999 and 2014, examines how income and geography profoundly affect life expectancies for Americans (WaPo, 4/11):

Overall, the new study offers the most exhaustive account yet of the rich-poor gap in American life expectancy. The data reveal that life expectancies continuously rise with income in America: The modestly poor live longer than the very poor, and the super-rich live longer than the merely rich.

A new divide in American death (WaPo, 4/10)

PHILANTHROPY
Opinion: In this op-ed, Public Welfare Foundation president and WRAG Board member Mary McClymont sheds light on the need for long overdue reforms to the civil justice system, and the need for more foundations to support civil legal aid for vulnerable citizens. (Chronicle, 4/8)

Consumer Health Foundation (CHF) president and WRAG Board member Yanique Redwood, and CHF Administrative and Communications Assistant Kendra Allen, share how their organization has used learning journeys to further connect with their grantees and view their work from a different perspective. (NCRP, 4/7)

COMMUNITY 
– Congratulations to Washington Area Women’s Foundation president Jennifer Lockwood-Shabat and her team for receiving Leadership Greater Washington’s 2016 Innovative Community Partner of the Year award! The award was sponsored by The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation.

CSR | The Advisory Board Company has released their 2016 Corporate Social Responsibility Report, detailing their investments in their CSR program, Community Impact, over the past two years.

INCOME INEQUALITYIs America Having the Wrong Conversation About Income Inequality? (Atlantic, 4/6)

HOUSINGDoes job growth strengthen a region’s housing market? (GGW, 4/8)

JOBS
Exponent Philanthropy seeks a Chief Program Officer

Wellspring Advisors is currently hiring for a Children’s Anti Poverty Program Officer.


 In what may be the coolest science project ever, a toy dog goes where no toy dog has ever gone before

– Ciara

View the first video

PUTTING RACISM ON THE TABLE/WRAG
The first video in the “Putting Racism on the Table” series is now live! The video features Professor john a. powell, Professor of Law and Professor of African-American Studies and Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, speaking on structural racism. After you’ve had a chance to view the video, we encourage you to share your thoughts on the series in general or on the specific topic via Twitter, using the hashtag #PuttingRacismOnTheTable, and on WRAG’s Facebook page. (Daily, 3/9)

POVERTY
– The American Academy of Pediatrics is encouraging a new policy that would have pediatricians begin screening children for poverty by asking their parents if they are able to meet their family’s financial needs. The move comes as part of an effort to improve mental health and public health outcomes in children, by addressing the impact of toxic stress caused by poverty. (USN, 3/9)

Related: Recently, Dr. Matthew Biel, Director of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Georgetown University Medical Center, joined us as the opening speaker for WRAG’s 2016 Public Education Speaker Series, to discuss the impact of toxic stress on child development.

– A study out of the University of Michigan examined more than 100,000 American households’ purchasing habits of toilet paper over a period of seven years. Researchers found that when it comes to buying necessities (like toilet paper and other household items) it takes money to save money – further supporting the notion that it is expensive to be poor. (WaPo, 3/8)

Related: On Wednesday, May 18, we will hear from Eldar Shafir, co-author of Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much, on the psychological influence of scarcity. This event is open to the public with registration.

– Your chances at becoming poor may be higher than you think (WaPo, 3/8)

COMMUNITY | Congratulations to Consumer Health Foundation (CHF) on being awarded the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy’s (NCRP) Impact Award for Small/Midsized Private Foundation! CHF president and CEO Yanique Redwood also serves as vice president of the WRAG board. The awards ceremony will take place on Tuesday, May 3.

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS | For some low-income families and individuals in need, strict zero-tolerance housing policies can create a vicious cycle in which they suddenly find themselves out of a place to call home. (Washingtonian, 3/7)

HEALTH | Medical Bills Still Take A Big Toll, Even With Insurance (NPR, 3/8)

DISTRICT | Mayor Muriel Bowser Announces Tech Hub Promoting Minority Companies (DCist, 3/8)

CSR | The Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce invites you to apply for the Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards. The application period is open through Friday, April 1, 2016, and is available online.


So…those cherry blossoms will be arriving a little sooner than expected.

– Ciara

WRAG Board elects 2016 board officers

WRAG
WRAG is excited to announce that this week the WRAG Board elected the following members to serve as new and returning board officers beginning in 2016:

ChairLynn Tadlock, Claude Moore Charitable Foundation
Vice ChairYanique Redwood, Consumer Health Foundation
TreasurerAnna Bard, Wells Fargo
Secretary – Mary McClymont, Public Welfare Foundation

CHILDREN/REGION
– DC Action for Children has released a new analysis based on 20 indicators of well-being to determine the state of children in the District’s eight wards. In some wards, children and their families are being left behind in an ever-growing city (WCP, 12/8):

Wards 5, 7, and 8 contain some of the largest numbers of children yet have the lowest median family incomes, even as the median income in D.C. increased by roughly 18 percent between 2010 and 2013. At least one in five children in Wards 1, 5, 6, 7, and 8 live in poverty, the analysis reports; the total child poverty rate in D.C. dropped by less than one percent during the same period.

– Another study sheds light on the high costs of child care for parents in the U.S. – and especially D.C., Maryland, and Virginia. As child care costs rival that of sending a young adult to college, the report by Child Care Aware urges Congress to take action. (WTOP, 12/8)

HOUSING | Why it’s so hard to afford a rental even if you make a decent salary (WaPo, 12/9)

ECONOMY/REGION | A recent gathering of three elected leaders from D.C., Maryland, and Virginia show that top leaders are starting to think more regionally. (WaPo, 12/8)

PHILANTHROPY 
Opinion: Author, chief executive of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, and previous WRAG Annual Meeting speaker Emmett Carson, shares in this open letter why he believes the Council on Foundations and Independent Sector should merge to build a stronger, more integrated network for the social profit sector. (Chronicle, 12/4)

Opinion: 3 Key Ideas on the Power of the Zuckerberg-Chan Pledge (Chronicle, 12/8)

HEALTH/HOMELESSNESS | The Atlantic explores the dynamic of a family in shelter with four young children as the parents participate in a program that aims to strengthen the bonds among homeless families that are often strained due to overwhelming stress. (Atlantic, 12/8)


Here are a few of the books Bill Gates says you should be reading right now.

– Ciara

 

Big announcements from WRAG’s 2015 Annual Meeting

WRAG
Last week, WRAG held our 2015 Annual Meeting, Philanthropy All In, at the National Press Club. We made several big announcements during the event.

 

  • WRAG Board of Directors
    The following leaders were elected for a two-year term on the WRAG Board of Directors:

David Bowers, Enterprise Community Partners
Rose Ann Cleveland, The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Nicky Goren, The Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

The following Board  Members were re-elected for a second two-year term on the WRAG Board of Directors:

Lindsey Buss, World Bank Group
Desiree Griffin-Moore, The Community Foundation for Prince George’s County
Yanique Redwood, The Consumer Health Foundation

  • Get on the Map
    Members can now explore this new resource for accurate, timely, and quality data on philanthropy in the region.

HEALTH | For the first time, the Northern Virginia Health Foundation (NVHF) has awarded $125,000 to five organizations in the region that are working to address social determinants of health. Traditionally, NVHF has centered its grantmaking on organizations providing health care and other health services to low-income and uninsured residents. (NVHF, 11/19)

COMMUNITY | The Lever Fund has announced the hiring of their first executive director, Gregory M. Cork, along with their inaugural board of directors.

DISTRICT/EQUITY
– According to a Washington Post poll of D.C. residents, there is a strong racial divide in the attitudes Washingtonians have about redevelopment in the city and who benefits from it. The number of African American residents who were polled about whether or not they see redevelopment as negative for “people like them” has grown a great deal over the last several years. (WaPo, 11/20)

– The Urban Institute takes a moment to ponder what a more equitable D.C. might look like. (Urban Institute, 11/19)

EDUCATION/WORKFORCE | A report from the Washington Area Boards of Education finds disparities in the salaries of teachers in the region from district to district. The report highlights the challenges facing some districts in hiring and retaining talent. (WaPo, 11/22)


Have you read any of these picks for the best books of 2015?

-Ciara

 

D.C.’s baby boom means new challenges

CHILDREN/DISTRICT
As the population of young children in the District surges, challenges in the availability of affordable, quality child care arise.  (WaPo, 11/14)

Infants and toddlers are the fastest-growing age group in the city, with 26,500 children younger than 3 in 2013, up 26 percent from 2010.

[…]

The cost of child care is a major concern for low-income families who must rely on government subsidies that many providers said do not cover the costs of quality programs. About a quarter of infants and toddlers in the District come from families with incomes below the federal poverty line.

RACIAL EQUITY
– In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland recounts how a tense exchange she observed on her neighborhood listerv showcased the difficulty surrounding discussions of race, and shares the opportunities that can arise out of these misunderstandings with a major announcement for the WRAG community for 2016. (Daily, 11/16)

– A recent debate over proposed bike lanes among longtime, largely African American residents in the District, and more recent primarily white transplants to the city, reveals some tensions around gentrification in the area. (WaPo, 11/12)

Your School Shapes How You Think About Inequality (NPR, 11/14)

ECONOMIC EQUALITY
– Yanique Redwood, president and CEO of the Consumer Health Foundation, discusses the ways in which the Greater Washington region can work to reshape the current economy in 2016 in order to create a more equitable workforce system. (CHF, 11/10)

FOOD | A site near the D.C./Maryland border will soon be the region’s largest urban farm. Organizers hope the farm will present a viable solution to the food desert problem that has persisted in areas of ward 7. (WAMU, 11/13)

HOMELESSNESS/HOUSING | The Washington Post looks at how permanent supportive housing has worked for a small group of women in the District. (WaPo, 11/15)

COMMUNITYMany Hands is accepting Letters of Inquiry from organizations interested in applying for a grant byNovember 30. Qualified 501(c)(3) organizations will be referred to one of four focus area committees – Education, Health, Housing and Job Readiness – for further consideration for grants, with the largest totaling $100,000. Click here and here for more information about the process, or visit manyhandsdc.org.


Does family makeup determine family giving? A new study says, “yes.”

– Ciara