Tag: WMATA

Region tops areas for entrepreneurship

ECONOMY/REGION
According to a new report, Washington, D.C. takes the top spot in the country for entrepreneurial cities. Maryland and Virginia ranked high at the state level (DC Inno, 6/3):

This is actually the second year in a row that the D.C. area has been top ranked in entrepreneurship, but the overall growth of entrepreneurship in the U.S. is notable, with only four cities earning a lower score than last year, and some cities dropping in rank despite higher scores only because others jumped ahead. And while D.C. was the center of entrepreneurship in terms of city rankings, Virginia and Maryland were numbers one and two respectively when it came to comparisons by state, no doubt aided by the gravitational pull of the D.C. metro area, along with some impressive numbers out of Baltimore.

CHILDREN/POVERTYThe Families That Can’t Afford Summer (NYT, 6/4)

SOCIAL JUSTICE/MASS INCARCERATION | Despite research showing that employment leads to lower rates of recidivism, many returning citizens are met with endless barriers to joining the workforce. (Atlantic, 5/31)

Related: Following the Putting Racism on the Table session on mass incarceration, Graham McLaughlin of the Advisory Board Company and returning citizen and business owner Anthony Pleasant discussed their personal insights into the justice system and the many challenges facing returning citizens. (Daily, 4/25)

PHILANTHROPY
– MacArthur to Give $100 Million to 1 Group to Solve 1 Big Problem (Chronicle, 6/2)

– Could the future of philanthropic giving lie within a mobile app? (Co.Exist, 6/3)

ENVIRONMENT/RACISM | For some African Americans, a long history of racial discrimination has prevented them from feeling as though they can fully embrace the U.S. park system. (City Lab, 6/2)

TRANSIT/REGION
– WAMU takes a look at how Metro’s SafeTrack plan will impact the District’s 8,500+ public school students throughout the summer and early fall. (WAMU, 6/6)

–  Metro’s SafeTrack Is Underway: Here Are Your Transportation Alternatives (WCP, 6/3)


Dear middle school pen pal from Turkey whose letter I never got around to responding to – I failed you miserably.

– Ciara

Report explores growth in women’s giving

The Daily will return on Tuesday, May 31. Enjoy the long weekend.

WOMEN/EQUITY
A new report by the Women’s Philanthropy Institute (WPI) explores the growth in women’s giving, along with trends in the demographics and motivations of those who give. (Inside Philanthropy, 5/24)

WPI has released a study showing for the first time that women are motivated by personal experience to give to causes that benefit women and girls specifically.

Sounds like a no-brainer, right? Well, it’s actually significant, useful information. Women’s tendency to donate money to specific causes based on experiences like having a child or discrimination suggests that philanthropy might take off in new directions as women become primary asset-holders in society and further increase their giving.

Inside Philanthropy recently highlighted the tremendous work and evolution of the Washington Area Women’s Foundation as they strive to improve the lives of women and girls in the Washington region. (Inside Philanthropy, 4/28)

– Report: The Tipped-Minimum Wage Leaves D.C. Women Behind (WCP, 5/24)

RACIAL EQUITY/YOUTH | In a follow up to their cover story investigating the views of American teenagers fifty years ago, Newsweek is back with another extensive look at the major social concerns of U.S. teens in 2016. According to their survey, “the most compelling findings show that race and discrimination are crucial issues for teens today.” (Newsweek, 5/2016)

HEALTHWhere Is All the Autism Funding? (Atlantic, 5/26)

TRANSIT | A major lack of investment in infrastructure is apparent in many ways lately – particularly in relation to aging public transit systems. Areas of the northeast continue to struggle with finding the resources to keep this vital component of many people’s lives efficient and safe. (NYT, 5/2016)

ARTS/EDUCATION | A growing number of educators in the District are looking toward integrating more of an arts focus in lessons in an effort to close the ongoing achievement gap among public schools. (USA Today, 5/25)

POVERTYHidden Camera Reveals How Little People Really Know About Poverty (HuffPo, 5/24)


Let’s say you really want to go to a museum, but you really don’t have the time to do that. Just look at these things and walk past everything else.

– Ciara

Few transit options for the region’s lower-income riders

TRANSIT
With a year’s worth of maintenance slated to take place throughout the Metrorail system, the impact is expected to be felt by most in the region. Those earning less than $30,000 annually, however, may be hit the hardest with fewer options for teleworking or affordable commutes to work. (City Lab, 5/19)

Among the 11 percent of Metrorail customers who earn less than $30,000 per year, many work low-wage, hourly shifts that don’t offer the option to telework. These riders can’t necessarily afford the convenience of a cab, an Uber, or even a smartphone to hail one. These riders still need to be able to get to their jobs, and for 29 hours in March, it was a lot harder for some.

EDUCATION
– Natalie Wexler – education blogger/editor of Greater Greater Education and DC Eduphile, and trustee of the Omega Foundation  discusses the challenges in achieving reading success for low-income students. On June 2, Dr. Willingham, psychology professor at the University of Virginia, will dive further into the role of background knowledge in reading comprehension and the persistent achievement gap among affluent and low-income students. (Daily, 5/23)

– Does Mindfulness Actually Work in Schools? (Atlantic, 5/20)

COMMUNITY
 The Citi Foundation announced the 40 social profit organizations selected as inaugural recipients of their Community Progress Makers Fund – a $20 million grant initiative supporting community organizations leading urban transformation efforts that create economic opportunities for low-income households and communities. D.C. is one of six U.S. cities with organizations that were selected, such as: Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing; Capital Area Asset Builders; Enterprise Community Partners Mid-Atlantic; Latino Economic Development Center; and LIFT

– The Center for Nonprofit Advancement has announced Higher Achievement as the winner of their 2016 AIM (Advancement in Management) Award, along with A-SPAN and National Children’s Alliance receiving honorable mentions. Pepco, Capital One Bank, and the Rotary Club of Washington, DC were sponsors of the award. Award recipients will also host an informative best practices session on May 24 at 10:00 am.

IMMIGRATION/POVERTY | Many of the young, recent Central American immigrants to the Washington region find that post-traumatic stress and poverty, along with attending high school, can result in a difficult cycle. (WAMU, 5/19)

HEALTH/CHILDREN
– With a growing number of students showing signs of mental health problems at school, educators are struggling to meet their needs. WAMU and nprED have presented a series on the challenges and possible solutions to approaching mental health issues in children. (WAMU, 5/23)

Due to a several challenges, the federal Summer Food Service Program – aimed at providing meals to children from low-income families during school break – only ends up reaching around 15 percent of those eligible. In places like Silver Spring, MD, for example, some children may have a hard time qualifying for such benefits when low-income housing is often in close proximity to affluent neighborhoods. (City Lab, 5/20)

–  Should Pediatricians Ask Parents If They’re Poor? (NPR, 5/18)

DISTRICT | The Washington Post explores the surge in homicides in D.C.’s ward 7. (WaPo, 5/21)


We all need to get adequate sleep, and trees are (possibly) no different.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – May 16 through May 20, 2016

THIS WEEK IN RACIAL EQUITY
– Consumer Health Foundation board member Silvia Salazar shared her reflections on the Putting Racism on the Table series and how it has had a meaningful impact on her life in this blog post available in both English and Spanish. (Daily, 5/19)

– Caitlyn Duffy, project associate for Philamplify at the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, discussed why she’s challenging philanthropy and other sectoral organizations to talk more explicitly about structural racism, and gave a shout out to WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series. (NCRP, 5/18)

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
– In light of the coming dissolution of the DC Trust, WRAG submitted a letter on behalf of the region’s philanthropic community to D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson, calling on the Council to maintain funding for out-of-school and summer programming for D.C.’s  children and youth in the FY17 budget.

Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers‘ president and CEO David Biemesderfer shared this open letter to foundations he signed as one of 22 nonprofit and philanthropy leaders, thanking foundations that have invested in nonprofit infrastructure. He also provided some examples of the important work Forum members Indiana Philanthropy Alliance, Maine Philanthropy Center, and WRAG are doing to strengthen communities nationwide. (Forum, 5/17)

THIS WEEK IN TRANSIT
– Metro Releases Finalized Long-Term Maintenance Plan. See How Your Commute Will Be Affected. (WCP, 5/19)


JOBS
Communications and Development Associate | Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing
Associate | Innovation Network, Inc. 
Research Assistant | Innovation Network, Inc. 
Part Time Bookkeeper/Accountant | ACT for Alexandria
Associate Director | Arabella Advisors
Associate Director (Conservation Focus) | Arabella Advisors
Director, Corporate Philanthropy | Council on Foundations
D.C. PrEP for Women Project Coordinator | Washington AIDS Partnership 

Visit WRAG’s Job Board for the latest job openings in the region’s social sector.


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.

Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Boston has found a poetic way to beat the rainy day blues.

– Ciara

D.C. Council eyes overhaul of shelter plan

HOMELESSNESS/DISTRICT
A supermajority of the D.C. Council announced plans to overhaul Mayor Muriel Bowser’s proposed shelter plan, citing “a waste of tax dollars” as a primary reason. The Council shared details of their own proposal (WaPo, 5/16):

Instead, the city would build five shelters on public land and empower Bowser (D) to purchase property or use eminent domain to take control of two others. The city would save about $165 million compared with the mayor’s plan, [Council Chairman Phil] Mendelson said.

[…]

Mendelson said the council’s plan would locate more families closer to Metro and other transit options, and streamline zoning approvals so the city’s dilapidated shelter at D.C. General might be able to close in two years. Most important, taxpayers would realize significant savings, he said.

D.C. is Reaching Hundreds of Families Before They Become Homeless (WCP, 5/16)

PHILANTHROPY | Exponent Philanthropy shares this open letter to foundations stressing the importance of nonprofit infrastructure organizations. (PhilanthroFiles, 5/17)

POVERTYConsumer Health Foundation‘s Kendra Allen discusses updates to D.C.’s looming TANF cliff with D.C. Department of Human Services Director Laura Zeilinger. (CHF, 5/16)

TRANSIT/REGIONA higher tax for Metro? Regionwide campaign to back dedicated funding expected in the fall (WBJ, 5/16)

YOUTH/CRIMINAL JUSTICE | Children’s Law Center recently sat down with former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to discuss the District’s changing landscape for young people and his thoughts on how the D.C. justice system has improved for them over the years. (Children’s Law Center, 5/16)


Are you a picky eater? It’s not your fault. You can blame science for that.

– Ciara

Rebranding the region

REGION
As part of the Roadmap effort, the 2030 Group has announced the hiring of global brand consultant Interbrand to develop a marketing campaign for the region that is expected to launch in early 2017 with the help of a rebranding working group (WBJ, 5/12):

The marketing campaign is part of a larger effort by the 2030 Group to identify weaknesses in the region’s economy and come up with ways to boost growth in a time of federal austerity. The organization has spearheaded working groups to explore affordable housing and how area colleges and universities can work more closely with the business community. A working group exploring a regional transportation authority has been suspended as Metro embarks on its yearlong effort to fix major problems, [2030 Group’s Bob] Buchanan said, although he still hopes to restart that conversation in the future.

Related: Last year, the 2030 Group’s Bob Buchanan and the Center for Regional Analysis’s Stephen Fuller undertook an extensive research project called, The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Future Economy, to recommend ways the region can reposition itself to remain competitive in the global economy. WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland also shared how philanthropy in the region might respond and collaborate with other sectors to meet challenges facing our communities. (Daily, 1/15)

COMMUNITY
– In light of the coming dissolution of the DC Trust, WRAG has submitted a letter on behalf of the region’s philanthropic community to D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson, calling on the Council to maintain funding for out-of-school and summer programming for D.C.’s  children and youth in the FY17 budget. Funders and advocates for children and youth will be watching closely as the DC Council votes on the proposed budget this month.

– BALLE (Business Alliance for Local Living Economies) recently named Consumer Health Foundation president and WRAG board member Yanique Redwood as one of 36 leaders in their 2016 BALLE Local Economy Fellowship. In this blog post, she discusses why she looks forward to working with other members of her cohort and continuing along a path toward community transformation. (Be a Localist, 5/12)

The Community Foundation for Northern Virginia has announced plans to create a $500,000 endowment for its Innovation Fund, following a $250,000 matching grant from an anonymous donor. They’ve also announced the launch of a new online-fundraising platform, Granted. (WBJ, 5/13)

FOOD 
– Prince Charitable Trusts presents a short film in their series about farming and food, titled The Culture of Collards, which recently  premiered at the DC Environmental Film Festival. The film traces the cultural heritage of collard greens from Portugal, to Africa, to the American south during the slave trade, up to their current state as a popular staple in many kitchens today. The 9-minute film features culinary historian Michael Twitty; owner of Three Part Harmony Farm in Northeast D.C. Gail Taylor; and City Blossoms co-founders Rebecca Lemos and Lola Bloom.

Related: In 2014, Michael Twitty kicked off WRAG’s Brightest Minds series with a discussion about building a more inclusive food movement. Check out this post that followed his talk, then take a look at the exciting lineup for WRAG’s Brightest Minds programs for the rest of the year. Brightest Minds programs are open to the public.

– The Ongoing Need for Healthy Food in Corner Stores (City Lab, 5/12)

EDUCATION
– As the acknowledgment of the importance of quality pre-k education in a student’s future success picks up steam across the country, some states continue to struggle with making these programs accessible to millions of children. Locally, D.C. made progress by serving more 3- and 4-year-olds than ever during the 2014-2015 school year. (WaPo, 5/12)

– The troubling shortage of Latino and black teachers — and what to do about it (WaPo, 5/15)


Which of the seven deadly sins do some of the most popular social networks represent? Pinterest is spot-on!

– Ciara

Complicated cases for Central American migrants to the U.S.

IMMIGRATION
For the many Central American migrants who have fled their homes to come to the United States, immigration court cases can often come down to a single question (WAMU, 2/25):

When is a migrant a refugee?

[…]

Since about 2009, many more Central American migrants — including many minors — are making the trip north and seeking asylum.

The reasons for the increase are fairly easy to explain. They parallel the ebb and flow of violent crime in the region. As the homicide rate spiked in Mexico, so did asylum applications; as San Pedro Sula became the murder capital of the world, asylum applications from Honduras increased. The U.N.’s refugee agency has interviewed hundreds ofwomen and children who have crossed the U.S. border over the past couple of years, and a vast majority of them said they were fleeing violence from organized crime.

– Consumer Health Foundation board member Silvia Salazar, discusses the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids that began in January, and the opportunity the philanthropic community has to get involved. (CHF, 2/24)

– Amid reports that a number of families in the school system have grown fearful of sending their children to school for risk of deportation, Arlington Public Schools are working to reassure worried parents. (WaPo, 2/25)

RACIAL EQUITY
– Rose Ann Cleveland, executive director of The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation and a member of the WRAG board, candidly shares her experience of witnessing racial inequality growing up in North Carolina, and how she came to realize that society treated certain people differently. (Daily, 2/25)

Opinion: When it comes to the highly-publicized #OscarsSoWhite controversy – in which movie fans and members of the entertainment industry’s workforce have openly criticized the lack of diversity in Hollywood – some parallels can be drawn to the lack of diversity within the social profit sector, according to one CEO.  (Chronicle, 2/25)

PHILANTHROPY | Exponent Philanthropy, the Fund for Shared Insight, and the Chronicle of Philanthropy present the next video in their new series called Philanthropy Lessons, in which funders share their experiences and what they’ve learned in their philanthropic careers. Check out the video and stay tuned for more through June.

COMMUNITY
– The Fund for Children, Youth, and Families at The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region is accepting request for proposals. Proposals must be submitted through the online application system no later than 4:00 PM, Thursday, March 31, and final grant decisions will be announced in August. Eligibility requirements, proposal guidelines, and submission instructions are available at http://www.fund4cyf.org.

 The Community Food Rescue Mini-Grants Program, available to help social profit organizations build infrastructure and increase capacity for the food recovery system, is accepting applications until March 1.For more information, contact Astoria Aviles.

ECONOMY
– Eighteen months following the opening of the first stations along WMATA’s Silver Line, economic development surrounding the stations is said to be taking off. (Inside NoVa, 2/23)

–  Low-Income Programs Not Driving Nation’s Long-Term Fiscal Problem (CBPP, 2/24)


Did you read today’s post while sitting at your desk eating lunch? Stop doing that! We’ll be here when you get back.

– Ciara

New data on average household income by Metro station

REGION
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority has released new data on the average household income of Metrorail riders by line and station. The visualization also shows how income levels rise and dip at various times throughout the day (GGW, 7/7):

You can see the Washington region’s wide range of income levels in the data visualization, which uses data from Metro’s 2012 rider survey. This visualization is different from similar ones in that it uses self-reported data from Metrorail riders.

A high quality transit system is a key to ensuring opportunities for people of every socioeconomic status.

– Loudoun Schools fight hunger through summer meal program (Loudoun Times, 7/7)

Related: Interested in learning more about the needs of Loudoun County? Join WRAG on Tuesday, July 14 at 1:00 PM for Loudoun Philanthropy: Next steps for developing a strong social sector. This meeting is open to the community and is supported by the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation, the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia, the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, and the Middleburg Community Center. Click here to find out how to register.

– Can you afford to retire in Loudoun County? (Loudoun Times, 7/8)

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | In Arlington County, a new citizen’s group is concerned about the discrepancies in where the county’s additional affordable housing units will be clustered. The group worries that there are disproportionate numbers of affordable housing being built in certain areas, which will lead to a great deal of socioeconomic segregation. (ARLnow, 7/7)

PHILANTHROPY | The Center for Effective Philanthropy has released a new publication, Investing and Social Impact: Practices of Private Foundations, which takes a look at the state of practice of impact investing and negative screening at large, private U.S.-based foundations. (CEP, 5/2015)

EDUCATION
– EdBuild has released a new interactive map that displays the poverty rates in each of the school districts in the United States. You can access the map here. (WaPo, 7/8)

– The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) released a new report on the differences in the quality of preparation students in high-poverty schools receive compared with students in low-poverty schools. The study, Course, Counselor, and Teacher Gaps: Addressing the College Readiness Challenge in High-Poverty High Schoolsanalyzes 100 of the largest school districts in the U.S. (PND, 7/5)

COMMUNITY | The Foundation Center offers a multi-functional training facility for rent for groups looking to host meetings, conferences, seminars, or computer-based training programs. For more information, click here.


Are your reusable grocery bags making you buy more cookies?

– Ciara

Minimum wage increases take effect in D.C. and Maryland

WORKFORCE
Starting today in D.C. and Maryland, another round of minimum wage increases take effect. In the District, the minimum wage will see an increase from $9.50 to $10.50. In Maryland, the minimum wage increases a quarter up to $8.25. Advocates for increasing the minimum wage are still hoping for greater change that mirrors that of a growing number of cities in the U.S. (WAMU, 7/1):

“It’s just a start. It’s not nearly where we should be. As you look around the country, you see cities quickly moving from $10.10 an hour being a goal to $15 an hour being a goal,” says [Director of Maryland Working Families, Charly] Carter.

And while such a move would be a tough sell across Maryland, it may come to pass in D.C. by next year. That’s when a group of labor activists hope residents will vote on a measure that would see the minimum wage continue rising to $15 by 2020.

Wages for tipped workers would also rise until they hit $15 by 2025, ending the existing discrepancy between tipped and other workers. Language for the ballot initiative will be considered by the D.C. Board of Elections on Wednesday.

REGION | In an effort to increase private-sector involvement to grow the county’s economy, the Montgomery County Council has voted to privatize the Montgomery County Department of Economic Development, making it a nonprofit corporation. (WaPo, 6/30)

PHILANTHROPY 
Foundation Heads Call on Peers to Publicize Diversity Data (Chronicle, 6/29)

Opinion: Kevin Jennings, executive director of the Arcus Foundation, looks at the role of philanthropy in helping the LGBT community cross the next hurdles after the Supreme Court’s recent ruling on marriage equality. (Chronicle, 6/26)

– IRS Plans to Begin Releasing Electronic Nonprofit Tax Forms Next Year (Chronicle, 6/30)

PEOPLE | Diana Aviv Leaving Independent Sector for Feeding America (Chronicle, 6/30)

ARTS | In Bethesda, Montgomery County planners contemplate what to do when public art isn’t exactly “public.” (WaPo, 6/30

TRANSIT
– Now that Maryland Governor Larry Hogan has given the ok to move forward with a revised plan for the Purple Line’s development, the next phase is to figure out how to fund it. (WAMU, 6/30)

– As confidence in the Metro system wanes and reliance on the system holds steady in our region, Greater Greater Washington explores some of the most pressing issues that need reform to ensure growth in the area and safety for commuters. (GGW, 6/29)


George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and William Howard Taft will soon get some competition at Nats Park

-Ciara

Caring for a growing population of seniors

WORKFORCE/AGING
By the year 2030, about one-in-four U.S. adults will be seniors age 65 or older. As the population ages, the need for quality home-care workers is growing, while their salaries and training requirements are not. (Atlantic, 4/27)

[…] the resources to help seniors stay at home are shrinking. Many seniors are finding that their boomer children are staying in the workforce longer than they did, and are unable to care for them. Demand for direct-care workers is expected to grow 37 percent between 2012 and 2022. Demand for personal care aides alone—the entry-level workers in the field—will grow 49 percent. There are currently 3.5 million direct-care workers in the country, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Seven years from now, there will be 1.3 million more.

[…]

On average, home care aides work 34 hours a week, and make an average of $17,000 a year. One in four live in households below the federal poverty line, and one in three doesn’t have health care because their employer doesn’t offer it or because they can’t afford it.Perhaps unsurprisingly, the field has a high rate of turnover—some estimates put it as high as 60 percent.

Of the ten occupations that added the most new jobs in 2012, personal-care aides earned less than all except for fast-food workers, according to the Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute.

Related: In 2013, WRAG published an edition of What Funders Need to Know about the challenges facing this critical workforce. (Daily, June 2013)

CSR 
– Ashley Williams, a UMD graduate student who has been working at Capital One since September through WRAG’s Philanthropy Fellows program, reflects on what she has learned during her fellowship about building partnerships between corporate and nonprofit organizations and aligning business strategy and community need. (Daily, 4/27)

WRAG Members: WRAG’s Philanthropy Fellows program is an exclusive partnership with the University of Maryland’s Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership. Through the program, WRAG connects our member organizations with UMD students studying philanthropy and nonprofit leadership at the School of Public Policy. Applications to host a Philanthropy Fellow are due by Friday, May 8. Learn more about the program and how to participate here.

– Last week, WRAG held the first Fundamentals of CSR workshop – a two-day event for individuals wanting to better understand the field of corporate responsibility, corporate philanthropy, and corporate community involvement. Here’s a special thank you to those who helped make the event a big success!

INEQUALITY 
– Income inequality is not just a problem for those in poverty; it’s a growing problem that affects everyone. Economic experts weigh in on some possible ways to begin tackling the widening gap. (The Baltimore Sun, 4/26)

– Forcing Black Men Out of Society (NYT, 4/25)

TRANSIT | Greater Greater Washington has released some new, interactive graphs that show the accessibility of the region’s metro stations to jobs and living spaces. (GGW, 4/24)

IMMIGRATION | Opinion: Think of Undocumented Immigrants as Parents, Not Problems (NYT, 4/27)


Do you communicate through emojis on your smartphone? Find out which ones are being used the most around the world.  

– Ciara