Tag: Washington AIDS Partnership

Daniel Gets “MORE” with the Washington AIDS Partnership

The MORE team is pictured here.

By Channing Wickham, executive director of Washington AIDS Partnership and Jennifer Jue, senior program officer at Washington AIDS Partnership

There are over 13,000 people living with HIV in Washington, D.C., and many of them struggle to access and stay in care and reach HIV viral suppression, the primary way we can prevent further transmission of HIV and end the local HIV epidemic. When an individual living with HIV is successfully engaged in care, their HIV virus becomes so low that it is undetectable and they are no longer able to transmit the virus.

In the District, people living with HIV often face multiple barriers to care and traditional medical services may not have worked for them, whether because of stigma, a lack of cultural competency, or inaccessible services. “Daniel,” one such resident, experienced this before participating in one of the Washington AIDS Partnership’s (WAP) most innovative and successful programs to date – the Mobile Outreach Retention and Engagement initiative (MORE):

When “Daniel” enrolled in MORE, he was depressed, had uncontrolled HIV, and was not working. He was living with a family member, who moved out and took all of the home’s furniture, drastically reducing his quality of life. Daniel had always been proud of his independence and as he became overwhelmed with his illness, he lost confidence in himself. With the support of the MORE program, he was able to engage in care, including successfully recovering from surgery at home. His self-esteem increased, and he recently found a job, telling his MORE provider, “I can do it.”

MORE grew out of a joint effort by WAP and the D.C. Department of Health’s HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Administration to figure out how to help people living with HIV to access and stay in care when traditional medical services have not worked for them and they are facing multiple barriers to care. To respond to this issue, WAP secured over $1 million in national funding and developed a request for applications (RFA) for organizations providing medical care to HIV-positive individuals. The RFA’s focus was a novel one: tailor medical services to the unique needs of each patient, and meet them where they are. The two overarching goals were: helping people access and stay in care; and improved health outcomes using innovative strategies such as medical visits in the home, evening hours, and providing care at non-traditional sites in the community.

After a competitive application process, Whitman-Walker Health (WWH) was selected and received funding to implement the Mobile Outreach Retention and Engagement (MORE) initiative. The initiative had a team-based approach with both clinical staff (physician assistant and nurse practitioners) and non-clinical staff (two care navigators and a community health educator). The MORE team provided medical care, counseling, and supportive services in the home and at pop-up community sites. Outcomes for the initiative are exciting: thousands of medical and support visits for patients who were out of care or struggling with staying in care, and real improvements in terms of engagement in care and lower HIV viral loads.

For more information about the initiative and its outcomes, click here.

Washington AIDS Partnership Rolls Out the DC PrEP for Women Initiative

By Caterina Gironda
Research & Communications Associate, Funders Concerned About AIDS

The Washington AIDS Partnership is an initiative of the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers. This piece is cross-posted from the Funders Concerned About AIDS blog. To read the full article, click here.


The Washington AIDS Partnership (WAP), in conjunction with the D.C. Department of Health’s HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Administration (HAHSTA), kick off their $1 million PrEP for Women Initiative this fall. Channing Wickham, Executive Director at the Washington AIDS Partnership and Chair of the Funders Concerned About AIDS Board of Directors, explains that the program emerged after identifying a lack of knowledge and access to the drug amongst African American women in D.C.

PrEP, or Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, is a drug that when taken regularly can prevent HIV infection if exposed to the virus. While the drug, approved by the FDA in 2012, has seen an uptick in use by gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM), knowledge of and access to PrEP has skirted other communities.

“According to HAHSTA’s data, approximately 2.5% of D.C. residents are living with HIV,” Ashlee Wimberly, the Project Coordinator for the PrEP for Women Initiative at WAP explains. “This exceeds the 1% infection rate that the World Health Organization uses to classify a generalized epidemic.” While HIV is not new to the District, the growing rate of African American women infected is, with 1 in 6 new diagnoses occurring among African American heterosexual women, making them the second largest affected group in D.C., behind African American MSM.

As Wickham explains it, “We began asking ourselves, ‘what would a model program to fill these gaps look like?’”

With buy-in from the M.A.C. AIDS Fund, which is providing a generous $1 million, two-year grant, the D.C. PrEP for Women Initiative began.

“A major component of the Initiative will be funding to support innovative projects that address one or more of the initiative’s goals,” says Wickham:

  • Educating women who are at high risk for HIV about PrEP
  • Supporting health providers to adopt PrEP into their organizational culture and services, especially those that serve women of color (such as Federally Qualified Health Centers).
  • Building PrEP capacity by educating health care providers so they are informed about PrEP and will begin to prescribe it.

WAP is also eager to share what they learn through this process to other funders who seek to replicate or create their own initiatives. “There’s plenty of room for collaborating on this,” Wickham offers. “In fact, FCAA’s Annual Philanthropy Summit in December 2016 will feature one of the most important voices for women and PrEP, Dazon Dixon Diallo, on a panel about health equity for women of color.”


Photos courtesy of courtesy of #PrEPForHer from DC Department of Health.

Some question expansion as summer youth jobs program begins

WORKFORCE/REGION
D.C.’s summer youth jobs program kicks off with 12,000 participants, including those who were made eligible due to the city raising the age limit from 21 to 24 in 2015. Meanwhile, officials grapple over data proving whether or not the age increase has proven to be a financially feasible move. (WaPo, 6/26)

If the program can’t prove that it helps its oldest participants find jobs that last beyond the summer, it stands to lose the millions of dollars needed to maintain the expansion that began last summer.

[…]

Unemployment rates for D.C. residents between age 20 and 24 are almost double the average rate in the city and even higher for young black people. About 1,000 men and women between the ages of 22 and 24 were accepted to the 2016 program, the maximum number allowed.

But the additional funding came with stipulations. The council agreed to permanently expand funding for the new age division only if the program could show that at least 35 percent of the 22-to-24-year-olds had full-time jobs after they completed the six-week program.

– Metro General Manager Paul J. Wiedefeld to eliminate 500 jobs (WaPo, 6/27)

HIV/AIDS | An interactive map providing a visualization of new HIV cases across the District has been released along with a new report by AIDSVu. The data used come from the city and the CDC, and show that D.C.’s ward 7 was hit the hardest with new HIV cases. (DCist, 6/23)

Related: Washington AIDS Partnership is at the forefront of efforts to “end HIV” in the city with a new program connecting black heterosexual women (the second-highest group of new HIV infections) to pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, and the soon-to-be released “90/90/90/50 by 2020” plan. (Daily, 6/20)

POVERTY/DISTRICT | WAMU presents a series exploring poverty this week, focusing today on the Greater Washington region and the underlying challenges its many social profit organizations face in aiding the poor. Residents and local leaders chime in on this interview, including president and CEO of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region Bruce McNamer, to discuss obstacles to combating poverty. (WAMU, 6/27)

EDUCATION | The D.C. government recently appealed a May ruling by the federal court that said the city is “providing inadequate services to young children with special needs who have yet to enter the school system.” (WaPo, 6/24)

COMMUNITY/REGION | Not far from the Greater Washington region, nearly 44 of West Virginia’s 55 counties have recently been hit hard by massive flooding. WRAG colleague organization Philanthropy West Virginia shares flood recovery response resources for those wishing to provide assistance.

LGBT | Gay Marriage in the United States, One Year Later (Atlantic, 6/26)

EQUITY | Many organizations and institutions are focusing their efforts around equity, but are they approaching equity…equitably? This blog post explores “meta-equity” and offers some suggestions for getting it right. (NWB, 6/27)


How much do you think it would cost to Uber across the country? This Fairfax filmmaker is about to find out

– Ciara

First citywide program for connecting black women with HIV prevention drugs coming to DC

HIV/AIDS 
A $1 million investment from the MAC AIDS Fund will go toward making D.C. the first major city to get a program that will connect black heterosexual women (the second-highest group of new HIV infections) in the District with pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP. (Slate, 6/17)

In 2009, D.C. declared an HIV epidemic that rivaled those in many African nations, with around 3 percent of the city’s residents living with HIV. In some areas and age groups, it was closer to 5 percent. Though targeted prevention efforts have cut D.C.’s new-diagnosis rate by almost 60 percent since then, the city still has an HIV rate nearly twice as high as the state with the next highest rate, Louisiana, and nearly 4 percent of black residents are infected. In D.C. and across the country, HIV is a racialized epidemic among women: As of 2012, 92 percent of D.C. women living with HIV were black.

Channing Wickham, executive director of Washington AIDS Partnership, which is at the forefront of these efforts, had this to say:

The Washington AIDS Partnership is excited to be at the center of Washington, D.C.’s goal to “end HIV” through the soon-to-be released “90/90/90/50 by 2020” plan, and innovative HIV prevention strategies such as  Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for women. Stay tuned for a major announcement with more details on June 30!

RACISM/INEQUALITY | Marcela Brane, Herb Block Foundation president and CEO, shares with WRAG this year’s winner of the Foundation’s annual Herblock Prize for Editorial Cartooning, and the enduring impact and significance of the political cartoonist in society. Check out the winning cartoon, “Racist EZCash,” by Mark Fiore(Daily, 6/20)

REGION | Leaders of Washington’s former bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics are said to be keeping up the momentum of their efforts by continuing to meet to discuss objectives for further regional cooperation, even without the possibility of the summer games. (WBJ, 6/17)

DISTRICT
Unemployment rates in D.C.’s ward 7 and 8 are at the lowest levels in several years, according to newly-released federal data from the Department of Employment Services. (WCP, 6/17)

– A report by the District’s Office of Revenue Analysis examines the gender pay gap among the city’s workforce. While men make more than women for the same work in most industries, D.C.’s nonprofit sector is shown to be one area where women often make more than men in similar positions. (WBJ, 6/17)

–  This Is The Insane Amount of Money it Takes To Be Considered “Wealthy” in DC (Washingtonian, 6/17)

EDUCATION
Montgomery County schools have adopted a new budget officials hope will narrow the school system’s achievement gap and lower class sizes. (WaPo, 6/17)

– Data show that more than 1.3 million U.S. students were homeless in 2013-2014. Advocates are looking to bring greater awareness and support to youth experiencing homelessness and extreme poverty, and a new report surveying homeless youth reveals that many schools may be failing to help students. (WaPo, 6/17)

HEALTH/YOUTH
– According to estimates, there are still 37 million homes in the U.S. that contain lead-based paint and 6 million that recieve drinking water through lead pipes. With children shown to absorb more lead than adults, the American Academy of Pediatrics is urging physicians to be more proactive about testing children for exposure. (NPR, 6/20)

Video: Can the U.S. End Teen Pregnancy? (Atlantic, 6/14)


Just in case you haven’t heard, Clevelanders are very, very happy today.

– Ciara

Continued population growth in Montgomery County

MARYLAND
Though the rate of growth remains low, Montgomery County saw the largest population increase in Maryland last year, according to figures from the U.S. Census Bureau. (Bethesda, 5/19)

The county’s estimated population as of July 1, 2015, was 1,040,116, meaning a population boost of 9,640 since 2014.

PUTTING RACISM ON THE TABLE/RACIAL EQUITY
– In this thoughtful blog post available in both English and SpanishConsumer Health Foundation board member Silvia Salazar reflects on the Putting Racism on the Table series and shares how the sessions have had a meaningful impact on her life by providing her with new ideas for viewing the world around her. (Daily, 5/19)

COMMUNITY | On Tuesday, May 24 at 9:30 a.m., The Lois & Richard England Family Foundation will host an opportunity to learn more about the 11th Street Bridge Park. Individuals interested in attending should RSVP to Irfana Noorani (irfana@bridgepark.org) to be added to the guest list.

HEALTH
– Through a partnership with the D.C. Department of Health, the public health group HIPS has begun distributing naloxone to in an effort to fight opioid drug overdoses in the District. (WCP, 5/18)

– For the third year in a row, the Washington region was named as the fittest metro area in the U.S. (WBJ, 5/18)

– America’s Health Segregation Problem (Atlantic, 5/18)

PHILANTHROPY
– A growing number of grantmakers are moving beyond the “overhead myth” to provide general operating grants and funding for administrative expenses for social profit organizations. WRAG’s colleague organization in Illinois, Forefront, shares some of their efforts to contribute to the shift in practices within their community. (Chronicle, 5/18) – Subscription Required

Opinion: Billionaire Manoj Bhargava shares his personal approach to philanthropy and why he thinks other philanthropists should consider an “attitude shift.” (Chronicle, 5/2)

– Program-Related Investments: Will New Regulations Result in Greater and Better Use? (NPQ, 5/12)

WORKFORCE
– Based on the new Department of Labor regulations expanding overtime benefits to full-time, salaried employees who make up to $47,476 a year, an estimated 4.2 million workers will be impacted – many of whom work at social profit organizations. (Chronicle, 5/18) – Subscription Required

– As more and more of the baby boomer generation retires out of the workforce, the generation’s business owners are being encouraged to transfer their company’s ownership to workers in order to improve communities and promote wealth distribution. (Co.Exist, 5/18)

TRANSITMetro Releases Finalized Long-Term Maintenance Plan. See How Your Commute Will Be Affected. (WCP, 5/19


Will you be biking to work tomorrow?

– Ciara

Veterans often faced with long waits for health care

VETERANS/HEALTH 
A new audit by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) reveals that veterans enrolling in health care from the Department of Veterans Affairs are typically faced with months-long waits before ever being able to see a medical provider. Wait-time manipulation and scheduling errors were found to be significant factors in causing such delays. (WaPo, 4/19)

The average waiting time — as measured from the time veterans requested that VA contact them to schedule appointments to when they were seen — at the six medical centers GAO studied ranged from 22 to 71 days. Of the 180 veterans GAO tracked, 60 still hadn’t been seen by the time the auditors ended their review last month, in several cases because VA never followed up on their requests to be contacted or because of other administrative errors.

FOOD/ENVIRONMENT | Op-ed: Celeste James of Kaiser Permanente and Ryan Strode of Arabella Advisors discuss the importance of building a “Good Food” system that uses sustainable farming practices and protects the Chesapeake Bay by avoiding large-scale industrial agriculture and over-fishing in the area. (Baltimore Sun, 4/13)

COMMUNITY | Inter-American Development Bank has launched a newly revamped Improving Lives grants program, open to nonprofit organizations serving low-income Latin American and Caribbean communities in the Washington metropolitan area. The program will combine five grants of up to $50,000 each with skills-based volunteering, and is aimed at promoting innovative projects involving community and economic development, health and well-being, education or the arts. Eligible organizations in the region may apply for grants by submitting proposals before 6 pm (EST) May 19, 2016. For more information, please read the requirements or write to idbcommunityrelations@iadb.org.

MARYLAND/ECONOMY | In a recent State of the Economy address, Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker spoke on his vision for making the jurisdiction a high-demand area for business. (WBJ, 4/13)

WORKFORCE/RACE
– How can organizations in the social sector work to build more diverse workplaces and address persistent institutional biases? Here are three key tools that may lead to success. (SSIR, 4/14)

– Feds urged to fight ‘unconscious bias’ in hiring and promotions (WaPo, 4/14)

TRANSIT | Bikeshare services, convenient and healthy, have long been a great option for those who can afford their annual memberships. Now, one service is expanding its reach to lower-income District residents by implementing need-based annual membership fees. (DCist, 4/13)

JOBS
Washington AIDS Partnership, an initiative of WRAG that invests more than $1 million annually in local organizations to improve HIV/AIDS and health-related services, seeks a program associate.

– All Ages Read Together seeks an executive director.


New Majority Labs, an organization dedicated to empowering communities of color to identify and build solutions to their own challenges using data and community engagement tools, recently tasked seven black youth from the District’s Ivy City neighborhood with conducting a survey of their neighbors, then used their findings to develop a hip hop song about the evolving community.

– Ciara

A look at employment in the social profit sector through the Great Recession

WORKFORCE
New data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveal that during the Great Recession, as other industries cut back significantly on hiring and increased layoffs, the social profit sector continued to add jobs – a trend that is likely to reverse, for better or for worse. (WaPo, 3/2)

At the same time, organizations dipped into rainy day funds to stay afloat, resulting in a decline in asset levels. Some workers may have accepted lower wages for non-profit work because of the poor job market, boosting employment as well.

All of that is also why, when the bureau next puts out employment numbers, the figures might show a decrease: Resources are depleted, and the need also isn’t as great.

– A new JPMorgan Chase report, “Tech Jobs for All? Exploring the Promise and Pitfalls of Technology Training in the United States,” takes a look at the rapidly growing and quickly evolving tech training field and the unique obstacles it faces in developing the skilled and diverse workforce required to meet a growing need within the economy. The report is part of  JPMorgan Chase’s $250 million, five-year New Skills at Work initiative to address the mismatch between employer needs and the skills of job seekers..

Opinion: Jobs for the Young in Poor Neighborhoods (NYT, 3/14)

WRAG/RACISM | In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland poses the question, “When was the last time you talked about racism?,” and explains her view on why you should start. (Daily, 3/15)

COMMUNITY/VIRGINIA | Opinion: Lynn Tadlock, Deputy Executive Director of Giving of the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation and WRAG board chair, shares her views on why urgent reform is necessary to put an end to gerrymandering in the state of Virginia. (Loudoun Times, 3/3)

HIV/AIDS | Eight American cities joined the Fast Track Cities Initiative, established on World AIDS Day in 2014 “to ensure that 90% of people living with HIV know that they have the virus, are taking anti-retroviral treatment medications and in so doing, are keeping the virus suppressed.” Take a look at what those cities, including the District, have been doing to successfully lower their HIV/AIDS rates and increase awareness. Kudos to the Washington AIDS Partnership for being recognized for their work! (Mic, 3/10)

POVERTY | Federal assistance for families in poverty can cover expenses like food, health care, and housing, but with data showing that families in the lowest-income quintile spend around 14 percent of their after-tax income on diapers, advocates are seeking ways to further support those in need with household necessities. (WaPo, 3/14)

HEALTH/EQUITY | WAMU unveils a new, four-part series on the continuing struggle for inclusion that those with developmental disabilities in the District face. (WAMU,  3/ 2016)

ARTS/PHILANTHROPY | Americans Support Increases for Government Arts Funding (ArtsBlog, 3/5)


Perhaps the only thing more significant than turning 100-years-old is being able to do it with three of your lifelong friends.

– Ciara

Moving on too soon?

HIV/AIDS/PHILANTHROPY 
In part two of their in-depth series on housing for HIV-positive residents in D.C., Washington City Paper explores how, after years of major federal and philanthropic funding to support successful initiatives to combat HIV/AIDS in the District, many of those sources are beginning to move toward funding other urgent causes with the false belief that the problem has been solved (WCP, 3/4):

Altogether, the slowed trickle of public and private funds out of the city has spurred concern among advocates and city officials alike. They worry that decreasing funds for HIV initiatives will sacrifice the progress that’s already been made, and that the cuts will take effect just as D.C. hits its stride in patient care.

Channing Wickham, executive director of Washington AIDS Partnership (WAP), who is quoted throughout the article due to WAP’s continued leadership in the fight against HIV/AIDS in the District, had this to say:

I look forward to the day when the Washington AIDS Partnership can close its doors and declare victory. Until then, I appreciate the local and national funders who participate in our funding collaborative, and encourage funders who haven’t gotten involved or who have moved on to join in our life-saving work.”

– In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland further explores the challenges many social profit organizations face when funders decrease giving in a particular issue area. (Daily, 3/7)

HOUSING | The Region Forward Coalition shares details of their first meeting of the year, at which WRAG vice president Gretchen Greiner-Lott presented Our Region, Your Investment, alongside Enterprise Community Loan Fund, as a part of the solution to the Greater Washington region’s affordable housing crisis. (Region Forward, 3/2)

FOOD/ENVIRONMENT | On Saturday, March 19 at American University, Farming for the Future will debut new films at this year’s D.C. Environmental Film Festival. Three of the films were done by the Center for Environmental Filmmaking at American University, with grant support from the D.C. office of Prince Charitable Trusts. The films include the premiere of The Culture of Collards, featuring culinary historian Michael Twitty; Gail Taylor, owner of Three Part Harmony Farm in Northeast D.C.; and Lola Bloom, Rebecca Lemos, and young people from City Blossoms, an urban farm/youth agricultural program in D.C. Reservations are requested to this popular event. Click here for additional information and to RSVP.

EDUCATION | A new documentary debuting this month, Southeast 67, follows the stories of 67 students from the District’s Anacostia neighborhood who were offered free college tuition as seventh-graders in 1988. Stewart Bainum, Sr.  and Eugene Lang (trustee of the Eugene M. Lang Foundation) were instrumental in establishing the program, as part of the I Have a Dream Foundation. (WaPo, 3/6)

HOMELESSNESS/DISTRICT | In Georgetown, the homeless can be hidden amid the million-dollar homes (WaPo, 3/6)

TRANSIT/MARYLAND | Here’s a look at what may be in store for the forthcoming Purple Line. (WTOP, 3/4)

ARTS | Before Smithsonian’s opening, smaller African American museums grapple with a behemoth in D.C. (WaPo, 3/2)

JOBS 
– The Coalition for Smarter Growth has an opening for a Development Manager.

– Flamboyan Foundation is seeking a Program Assistant.


A reporter once declared this the worst place to live in America. Now, he’s moving there.

– Ciara

The penny isn’t always shiny and new

by Tamara Lucas Copeland
President
Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

On Friday, the Washington City Paper featured a major article on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the District of Columbia. It highlighted several excellent programs, such as the Washington AIDS Partnership’s Positive Pathways’ community health workers, celebrated the leadership of D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, and very candidly reminded us all of what happens when a funder – be it the federal government, a national funder, or a local grantmaker – stops funding in a given area; successful programs are put in jeopardy.

We – social profit organizations – always know that such a reality is possible, but we continue to believe, as the funding community often tells us to, that if we just show impact, if the evaluation data reflects positive outcomes, the financial support will remain. But that is not always true. As Channing Wickham, executive director of the Washington AIDS Partnership, an initiative of the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers, pointed out in the article, “It’s an unfortunate reality […] HIV  is no longer a new and exciting issue.” He continued by saying, “In this work, in year one a new program is exciting. By the fifth year, even if you have results … it’s not the latest thing on the block.” His remarks reflect the perception that some funders prioritize being on the cutting-edge, changing their goals as new research emerges or as new leadership takes the helm.

So what do we do?

To the social profit organizations, I say evaluation data is definitely a key part of the protective coating, but, as you know, it isn’t the only ingredient to safeguard continuing funding. You need visibility for your issue, like what HIV/AIDS received in that major article in Friday’s paper. You need a champion like Barbara Jordan was for funding for HIV/AIDS programs during her service on the Freddie Mac Foundation Board years ago and Mayor Bowser seems to be today. And, even with the data, the visibility, and the champion, your funder may still close his doors or decide to change funding priorities. It’s not a new story. You must continue to be nimble, telling all who will listen about the need and about your impact, be a visible advocate, and always work to broaden your base of support.

To the funding community, just a reminder: sometimes the right intervention isn’t new and flashy. It is grounded in research. It is making a difference. It is simply tried and true – the community health worker, the peer counselor, the mentor. Not the shiny new penny, but the value is the same.

Reported HIV cases decrease for seventh year in a row

HIV/AIDS
According to a new report released by the D.C. Department of Health, the number of reported annual new HIV cases is down for the seventh consecutive year. (DCist, 2/2)

The report shows preliminary data for 2014, which includes 396 new HIV cases – a 29 percent decrease from the 553 cases reported in 2013. The highest number of HIV cases was reported in 2007 with 1,333 cases. Since then, numbers are down by 70 percent.

Executive director of the Washington AIDS Partnership, Channing Wickham, had this to say of the news:

I’m very pleased to see the hard work of the nonprofit community, the D.C. Department of Health, and the HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB Administration (HAHSTA) reflected in the latest data for new HIV cases.  At the same time, it’s imperative to remember the thousands of District residents who are living with HIV and the need to continue and expand HIV prevention efforts.

REGION/ECONOMY | A new study by the Brookings Institution ranks the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria area against 99 other metro regions in the U.S. in terms of recovery from the Great Recession. The study rates the D.C. area’s performance as: 71st in “growth;” 91st in “prosperity;” 72nd in “inclusion;” and 77th in “inclusion by race.” (DCist, 2/2)

HOUSING/DISTRICT | Some 7,300 households rely on public housing in the District. With a number of public housing properties slated for overdue rehabilitation or replacement, DC Fiscal Policy Institute shares some of the risks this could cause for families who may be displaced, and offers recommendations for their protection. (DCFPI, 1/27)

WORKFORCE/SOCIAL PROFITS | Hiring Keeps Rising at Nonprofits in N.Y and D.C., Study Says (Chronicle, 2/2)  Subscription required

YOUTH/EDUCATION
– The District and the D.C. Public Library have announced a new program, Books from Birth, that will send enrolled children a book every month until the age of five. The program is a partnership between the city and the Dollywood Foundation. (WCP, 2/2)

How Rich Parents Can Exacerbate School Inequality (Atlantic, 1/28)

ARTS/RACIAL EQUITY | Opinion: A writer shares his experiences witnessing slotting, tokenism, and dehumanization in the nonprofit theater sector. (NPQ, 1/29)

POVERTY | OpinionWhat Data Can Do To Fight Poverty (NYT, 1/29)


The Washingtonian presents a guide to successfully living in Washington, D.C.

– Ciara