Tag: ward 8

Friday roundup – June 20 through June 24, 2016

THIS WEEK IN RACIAL EQUITY 
– Marcela Brane, Herb Block Foundation president and CEO, shared this year’s winner of the Foundation’s annual Herblock Prize for Editorial Cartooning. Be sure to check out the winning cartoon, “Racist EZCash,” by Mark Fiore(Daily, 6/20)

– The latest video in the Putting Racism on the Table series is live! The video features Dr. Manuel Pastor, Professor, Sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California, on the experiences of non-black racial minorities in the United States. While you’re at it, stop by our website to find the viewing guide and discussion guide that accompany the video.

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY 
– WRAG’s summer intern Hudson Kaplan-Allen offered the key takeaways from the first session of WRAG’s 2016 Nonprofit Summer Learning Series, “Dos and Don’ts of Working with Grantmakers,” and the importance of cultivating authentic relationships among funders and grantees. The event featured keynote speaker Rick Moyers of the The Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation, and panelists Julia Baer-Cooper, consultant with the England Family Foundation and Prince Charitable Trusts, Ben Murphy of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, and Tracye Funn of Washington Gas. (Daily, 6/21)

– PwC took home the Outstanding Corporate Citizen of the Year (Large Business) award at the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s 2016 Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards.

THIS WEEK IN THE DISTRICT
– Unemployment rates in D.C.’s ward 7 and 8 are at the lowest levels in several years, according to recent federal data from the Department of Employment Services. (WCP, 6/17)

THIS WEEK IN HOMELESSNESS
– Officials in Fairfax County are striving toward a more supportive community for the homeless with the opening of a new center. (WaPo, 6/22)

– According to data, more than 1.3 million U.S. students were homeless in 2013-2014. Advocates are looking to bring greater awareness and support to youth experiencing homelessness and extreme poverty, and a new report surveying homeless youth reveals that many schools may be failing to help students. (WaPo, 6/17)


JOBS

Associate | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Research Assistant | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Philanthropic Services Associate | The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
Grants Manager | The Norman & Ruth Rales Foundation
Senior Communication Consultant | Kaiser Permanente
Part Time Bookkeeper/Accountant | ACT for Alexandria
Associate Director | Arabella Advisors
Director, Corporate Philanthropy | Council on Foundations

WRAG’s Community Calendar

Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


So today is apparently #TakeYourDogToWorkDay. Brace yourself for cuteness overload and click the hashtag to see some dogs hard at work.

– Ciara 

First citywide program for connecting black women with HIV prevention drugs coming to DC

HIV/AIDS 
A $1 million investment from the MAC AIDS Fund will go toward making D.C. the first major city to get a program that will connect black heterosexual women (the second-highest group of new HIV infections) in the District with pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP. (Slate, 6/17)

In 2009, D.C. declared an HIV epidemic that rivaled those in many African nations, with around 3 percent of the city’s residents living with HIV. In some areas and age groups, it was closer to 5 percent. Though targeted prevention efforts have cut D.C.’s new-diagnosis rate by almost 60 percent since then, the city still has an HIV rate nearly twice as high as the state with the next highest rate, Louisiana, and nearly 4 percent of black residents are infected. In D.C. and across the country, HIV is a racialized epidemic among women: As of 2012, 92 percent of D.C. women living with HIV were black.

Channing Wickham, executive director of Washington AIDS Partnership, which is at the forefront of these efforts, had this to say:

The Washington AIDS Partnership is excited to be at the center of Washington, D.C.’s goal to “end HIV” through the soon-to-be released “90/90/90/50 by 2020” plan, and innovative HIV prevention strategies such as  Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for women. Stay tuned for a major announcement with more details on June 30!

RACISM/INEQUALITY | Marcela Brane, Herb Block Foundation president and CEO, shares with WRAG this year’s winner of the Foundation’s annual Herblock Prize for Editorial Cartooning, and the enduring impact and significance of the political cartoonist in society. Check out the winning cartoon, “Racist EZCash,” by Mark Fiore(Daily, 6/20)

REGION | Leaders of Washington’s former bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics are said to be keeping up the momentum of their efforts by continuing to meet to discuss objectives for further regional cooperation, even without the possibility of the summer games. (WBJ, 6/17)

DISTRICT
Unemployment rates in D.C.’s ward 7 and 8 are at the lowest levels in several years, according to newly-released federal data from the Department of Employment Services. (WCP, 6/17)

– A report by the District’s Office of Revenue Analysis examines the gender pay gap among the city’s workforce. While men make more than women for the same work in most industries, D.C.’s nonprofit sector is shown to be one area where women often make more than men in similar positions. (WBJ, 6/17)

–  This Is The Insane Amount of Money it Takes To Be Considered “Wealthy” in DC (Washingtonian, 6/17)

EDUCATION
Montgomery County schools have adopted a new budget officials hope will narrow the school system’s achievement gap and lower class sizes. (WaPo, 6/17)

– Data show that more than 1.3 million U.S. students were homeless in 2013-2014. Advocates are looking to bring greater awareness and support to youth experiencing homelessness and extreme poverty, and a new report surveying homeless youth reveals that many schools may be failing to help students. (WaPo, 6/17)

HEALTH/YOUTH
– According to estimates, there are still 37 million homes in the U.S. that contain lead-based paint and 6 million that recieve drinking water through lead pipes. With children shown to absorb more lead than adults, the American Academy of Pediatrics is urging physicians to be more proactive about testing children for exposure. (NPR, 6/20)

Video: Can the U.S. End Teen Pregnancy? (Atlantic, 6/14)


Just in case you haven’t heard, Clevelanders are very, very happy today.

– Ciara

Six-figure salary needed to rent a two-bedroom apartment

AFFORDABLE HOUSING/DISTRICT
Yet another study confirms the significant housing burden placed on families in the District, projecting that a household would need to bring in more than $119,000 in order to rent a two-bedroom apartment. (DCist, 5/17)

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development recommends that households spend 30 percent or less of their income on rent. To meet that requirement, families must earn an annual income of $119,271 to afford a two-bedroom apartment here, according to a study from SmartAsset.

The median household income in the city was $71,648 in 2014 (numbers for 2015 won’t be released until September).

PHILANTHROPY/SOCIAL JUSTICE/RACISM
– Caitlyn Duffy, project associate for Philamplify at the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, discusses why she is challenging philanthropy and other sectoral organizations to talk more explicitly about structural racism, citing WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series as one such example of how that is currently taking place (NCRP, 5/18):

[..] there are a number of affinity groups that have chosen to address race explicitly – going beyond coded language such as “inequality” or “lack of diversity.” For example, the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers (WRAG) is hosting Putting Racism on the Table, a learning series that I have attended on behalf of the Diverse City Fund. WRAG’s president, Tamara Copeland, recently shared why Nonprofits Need to Talk About Race, Not Just Diversity in The Chronicle of Philanthropy.

HEALTH CARE
– With their Patient-Centered Medical Home program, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield is working to help improve care coordination among primary care providers and specialists in order to reign in health costs. (WBJ, 5/17)

Video: Children’s Health Care Expands in Southeast DC (WUSA, 5/16)

More Low-Income Kids Now Have Health Coverage (NPR, 5/13)

EDUCATION/POVERTY | VideoNine facts about attending college when you are poor (WaPo, 5/17)

FOOD | As part of the Feed the 5,000 campaign – an initiative to shed light on the issue of global food waste – 5,000 people in the District can receive free meals today, featuring recovered produce that would have otherwise been discarded. (WaPo, 5/16)

WORKFORCEMillions To Be Eligible For Overtime Under New Obama Administration Rule (NPR, 5/17)

HOMELESSNESS | In San Francisco, a number of media outlets have pledged to unite and dedicate coverage to homelessness in the city on June 29. Participants hope the project will not only turn more attention to the issue, but also inspire government agencies to set aside their own differences around the matter. (GOOD, 5/17)


A growing number of new parents are naming their babies after a major sports channel…and it actually does have a nice ring to it!

– Ciara

New partnership brings support for small businesses in wards 7 and 8

DISTRICT/ECONOMY
As part of a new partnership between American University’s Center for Innovation in the Capital and the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Greater Economic Opportunity, an initiative called Project 500 will offer support to hundreds of small businesses focused in D.C.’s wards 7 and 8. (DCist, 5/4)

Project 500 […] will provide resources to 500 “disadvantaged small businesses,” helping them to “grow in revenue and size over the next three years,” according to a release. Targeted businesses in wards 7 and 8 will include home-based companies and start-up ventures. Help will come in the form of “hands-on training, capacity building, mentoring, and networking support.”

From data gathered between 2006-2010, the Urban Institute found that a vast majority of D.C.’s economically challenged neighborhoods are located in wards 7 and 8. And not much has changed, despite Mayor Bowser cutting the ribbons of a Thai restaurant in ward 7 and a juice bar in ward 8 last year.

– D.C. is often said to be gaining 1,000 new residents per month without much explanation behind the figures. Greater Greater Washington breaks down the data that is actually driving those numbers. (GGW, 5/4)

PHILANTHROPY 
– A growing number of funders are stepping up to get involved in the food waste movement, including Agua Fund and New Venture Fund. Inside Philanthropy ponders whether or not the movement will catch on further in the world of philanthropy. (Inside Philanthropy, 5/3)

– How philanthropy can address barriers to social mobility (Urban, 5/5)

GUN VIOLENCE | The Joyce Foundation, Urban Institute, and the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies have released a new research report on gun violence in America, along with a roadmap to building safer communities. You can review the report’s top findings here.

HEALTH/CHILDREN
– Judith Sandalow of The Children’s Law Center marks this year’s Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day by highlighting the progress that the District has made in addressing the needs of its youngest residents. (HuffPo, 5/5)

–  Autism Research’s Overlooked Racial Bias (Atlantic, 5/5)

TRANSIT/REGIONMetro To Announce Major Months-Long Rehab Effort Affecting Most Riders (WAMU, 5/5)

WORKFORCE | Have you ever thought about taking on a midlife internship opportunity? Maybe not, but a growing number of companies and social profit organizations are creating opportunities for adults who have taken career breaks to re-enter the workforce through “returnships.” (NYT, 5/5)


Thirty-three years ago, David Copperfield taught us all a big lesson about liberty.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – April 11 through April 15, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG
– We released the second video in the Putting Racism on the Table series, featuring Dr. Robin DiAngelo, former professor of education and author of What Does It Mean to be White?, speaking on white privilege. After viewing, we encourage you to share your thoughts on the series or on the specific topic via Twitter using the hashtag #PuttingRacismOnTheTable, or by commenting on WRAG’s Facebook page. We also suggest checking out the viewing guide and discussion guide to be used with the video. Both can be found on our website.

THIS WEEK IN PHILANTHROPY
 In an update to WRAG’s Beyond Dollars report originally published in 2009, former managing director Kristin Pauly of The Prince Charitable Trusts provided the latest on their efforts to help protect a cultural and environmental asset in Virginia, and presented a new documentary on the fight, When Mickey Came to Town. (Daily, 4/13)

Opinion: Public Welfare Foundation president and WRAG Board member Mary McClymont shed light on the need for long overdue reforms to the civil justice system, and the need for more foundations to support civil legal aid for vulnerable citizens. (Chronicle, 4/8)

– Consumer Health Foundation (CHF) president and WRAG Board member Yanique Redwood, and administrative and communications assistant Kendra Allen, shared how CHF has used learning journeys to further connect with their grantees and view their work from a different perspective. (NCRP, 4/7)

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION
– Editorial: The Washington Post took a look at recent violent crime occurring in the District’s wards 7 and 8, and the importance of tackling social issues that are often factors in crime. (WaPo, 4/11)

– Why Virginia is shaking up its economic development strategy (WBJ, 4/12)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


How did you know when you were officially an adult?

– Ciara

New video is live – Putting Racism on the Table: White Privilege

PUTTING RACISM ON THE TABLE/WRAG
The second video in the “Putting Racism on the Table” series is now live! The video features Dr. Robin DiAngelo, former professor of education and author of What Does It Mean to be White?, speaking on white privilege. After you’ve had a chance to view the video, we encourage you to share your thoughts on the series or on the specific topic via Twitter using the hashtag #PuttingRacismOnTheTable, or by commenting on WRAG’s Facebook page. We also suggest checking out the viewing guide and discussion guide to be used with the video. Both can be found on our website.

WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland said of the video release:

I am so pleased to share the next installment of the Putting Racism on the Table video series. Dr. Robin DiAngelo provided a thought-provoking and memorable session on a topic that is an integral piece of the puzzle surrounding the various aspects of race and racism. In this video, Dr. DiAngelo takes viewers on an exploration of white privilege and how it works to perpetuate an inequitable society.

HOUSING/ARTS | You can take a glimpse inside The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation‘s Art Place at Fort Totten, a new development coming in mid-2017 to include more than 900 apartments, a new children’s museum, and retail. (WBJ, 4/11)

EDUCATION/NATIONAL | New data show that, in 23 states, the annual cost of educating a 4-year old at a full-time day care center exceeds the average cost of in-state tuition at a four-year institution. Maryland is one of those states. (WSJ, 4/11)

SOCIAL EQUITY
– A new study suggests that when an individual has just a brief, in-person empathetic encounter with another individual who identifies with a group they hold prejudice against, their views can be  dramatically changed. (City Lab, 4/8)

AudioBlind Hiring, While Well Meaning, May Create Unintended Consequences (NPR, 4/12)

PHILANTHROPY | OpinionPhilanthropic Leadership Shouldn’t Still Look Like the Country-Club Set (Chronicle, 4/11) Subscription required.

DISTRICT| Editorial: The Washington Post takes a look at recent violent crime occurring in the District’s wards 7 and 8 over the past several days, and why it remains so important to tackle social issues that are often factors in crime. (WaPo, 4/11)


Go, Twiggy, go!

– Ciara

Reflections on implicit bias

by Missy Young, Board Chair, and Dara Johnson, Lead Staffer
The Horning Family Fund

Putting Racism on the Table is a six-part learning series for WRAG member philanthropic CEOs and their trustees to explore key elements of racism together. Last week, participants examined the dynamics of implicit bias with Julie Nelson, Director of the Government Alliance on Race & Equity, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society. Below, Horning Family Fund Board Chair Missy Young, and lead staffer Dara Johnson, share their respective experiences with implicit bias and what the series has meant to their organization.

 


Missy Young

WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table learning series has provided me with an opportunity to build on my personal experiences and to develop new directions in my work with the Horning Family Fund.

I was born in Washington and am the product of parents who were active in the Civil Rights Movement. I grew up in a diverse neighborhood, and had black neighbors and friends. When I was a teen, one of the best Christmas presents I ever received was two season tickets to Georgetown University basketball games. Coach John Thompson became one of my heroes – not only for his winning ways as a coach, but also because he opposed the exploitation of his black players and insisted that they get a good college education. Over the years, I have valued these experiences and have had plenty of chances to consider the causes and effects of individual and institutional racism. But participating in this series has provided me a growing and deeper understanding of systemic racism.

The Horning Family Fund has historically funded organizations that address educational inequities and improve outcomes for children in our city. About ten years ago, we decided to focus our efforts on Ward 8. And because we want to address more than the symptoms of poverty, we now fund advocacy organizations, as well.

Putting Racism on the Table has inspired our board to learn more about the roots of injustice and specifically the relationship between institutional racism and poverty. We have been challenged to act on our new knowledge. Recently, we added a question to our grant application that asks, “Does your organization participate in any racial equity training?” This question has already helped us to understand more about our grantees and how they see the context of their work. To advance our exploration and understanding of structural racism, several of our board members also plan to participate in the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond’s racial equity training.

On my way to last Friday’s Putting Racism on the Table session on implicit bias, I stopped for coffee at a nearby cafe and noticed that a white male was operating the cash register while the six other employees (all black) were busy doing other jobs. I wasn’t sure what to make of this. Something didn’t seem right. And though I have noticed similar situations before, I saw it differently this time – with a sense of urgency and hope that our work together as philanthropists will make a difference.


Dara Johnson

This month’s series on implicit bias caused me to reflect on my past work experience and new role at the Horning Family Fund. Prior to joining the Horning Family Fund, I served 14 years as a public school teacher and administrator in predominately black schools located in lower-income communities. I was determined to change the outcome of every child in my sphere of influence. My commitment and optimism was challenged every year as I ran into resistance from leaders, teachers, and school systems. There is no doubt that these groups wanted success for every child; yet their practices and decisions weren’t always aligned with this vision.

I recall working in multiple schools where parent engagement was mandated by the school district, but across many Title I schools (which serve lower-income communities), the budget was primarily spent on food rather than meaningful programs and supports for parents. The notion that parents in lower-income communities would only show up if a meal was provided, or that we shouldn’t invest substantial time around developing programs, was a direct reflection of how some staff members viewed our parents and their children. Some would even joke about holding meetings at a club or the local carryout, implying that’s what our parents would rather do than invest in their children. What I found most interesting about this whole experience is that the same staff members, who refused to change our parent engagement strategy, were also frustrated with the low level of parent engagement. Their biases of our parents shaped by their own experiences, as well as societal influences, caused them to retain a low expectation for parents in the community.

I’m not sharing this to highlight flaws because there were times when I had to reflect on my actions toward specific children and families. We have to recognize that having biases don’t make us bad people – we all have them. The key is to understand how our biases shape the decisions we make within our organizations. Then we can strategically implement changes that “close the gap” between our mission statements and our actions. Actions will always ring louder than our words.

As I think about my role with the foundation, this difficult and essential work toward racial equity will have to start internally. I applaud WRAG for bringing this topic to philanthropic leaders. However, if we seek to address the issues in others while denying the work that needs to happen within each of us, we will continue to perpetuate the same pattern of behavior that hinders our progress.

As we move forward as a foundation, I know we will continue to examine the change we ultimately want to make and identify how we go about making this change happen. Current and future generations are depending on us to not only fund programs, but to address the underlying causes of inequity. I know we don’t have all the answers or a finalized plan of action; nonetheless, we are at a good starting place. I’m so glad to participate in Putting Racism on the Table with our board chair and board member.


Last week, Lynne and Joe Horning and the Horning Family Fund, housed at The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, were honored with the 2016 Civic Spirit Award at the 2016 Annual Celebration of Philanthropy.

How growing up in a poor neighborhood can impact boys and girls differently

GENDER/SOCIAL MOBILITY
A new analysis examines how childhood environment can impact social mobility for boys and girls. The study looks at how boys and girls from the same poor neighborhood are often affected very differently by their surroundings, with boys often experiencing tougher circumstances (City Lab, 2/3):

The researchers analyzed tax records of 10,000 U.S. citizens born between 1980 and 1982 once they turned 30, as well as economic and social data on their parents while they were growing up. Their findings “demonstrate that gender gaps in adulthood have roots in childhood, perhaps because childhood disadvantage is especially harmful for boys.” The findings are significant not just in understanding how place matters for social mobility of men and women, but for explaining trends about the U.S. labor force as a whole.

Related: WRAG is kicking off our 2016 Brightest Minds series, supported by JP Morgan Chase, in which thought leaders share ideas that may make you think about your communities and work in whole new ways. Check out this year’s exciting line-up which includes speaker Eldar Shafir, who will be discussing poverty’s influence on cognition and decision-making. WRAG’s Brightest Minds programs are open to the public.

EDUCATION | This fall, 10 new D.C. Public Schools will begin an extended school year in an effort to combat summer learning loss – a big problem for many children from low-income families. Those schools will join the more than 40 schools in the DCPS system that already have extended days. (WAMU, 2/3)

Related: WRAG is also excited to roll out our 2016 Public Education Speaker Series, supported by the Omega Foundation and and the Tiger Woods Foundation, on a variety of critical topics facing students today. Education Funders: Click here to learn more about the series and to register. Please, note that these programs are open to grantmakers only.

PHILANTHROPY
– A new, first-of-its-kind resource, The Almanac of American Philanthropy, serves as a definitive guide of the “power and cultural importance of American giving.” The book is produced by The Philanthropy Roundtable and features information on great achievements in American philanthropy, the most influential donors, significant ideas, and more. (Philanthropy Roundtable, 2/4)

– The Atlas of Giving estimates a 2.6 percent rise in charitable giving in 2016. (Chronicle, 2/3)

Could Giving Circles Rebuild Philanthropy from the Bottom Up? (NPQ, 2/4)

ARTS | In Ward 8, the Anacostia Arts Center, often considered one of the area’s “best-kept secrets,” shows much promise for the surrounding neighborhood’s growth. (WaPo, 1/28)


Were any of these books featured on your college syllabus?

– Ciara 

Achievement gap begins as early as infancy for D.C. children

DISTRICT/YOUTH
Despite being a national leader in providing universal preschool access to four- and five-year-olds, children in the District face an achievement gap that begins as early as infancy. According to a new study by Child Trends commissioned by the Bainum Family Foundation, there are significant disparities that persist in the lives of children in D.C. across neighborhood, racial, and class lines. (WaPo, 12/10)

The report, which draws on several years of local and federal data, describes “a tale of two cities” in the District — with children in the poorest neighborhoods, in Wards 7 and 8 east of the Anacostia River, born a world apart from those in the wealthiest neighborhoods, in Ward 3.

COMMUNITY | Grantmakers in Health has announced their newly-elected board members. Congratulations to WRAG Board Chair and president and CEO of the Northern Virginia Health Foundation Patricia N. Mathews on being among one of the new board members! (GIH, 12/9)

WORKFORCE | Mayor names Busboys and Poets owner Andy Shallal to key jobs post (WaPo, 12/14)

HEALTH
– A recent analysis by the DC Fiscal Policy Institute reveals that technical problems with D.C.’s Medicaid application system have created a backlog that may leave many low-income residents without health coverage. (WCP, 12/14)

Opinion: Why Are So Many Black Women Dying of AIDS? (NYT, 12/11)

POVERTY | When Government Tells Poor People How to Live (City Lab, 12/14)

PHILANTHROPY | What role does philanthropy play in fostering social movements? Here’s a brief history of how philanthropy found its place in joining the movement for school discipline reform. (Inside Philanthropy, 12/8)

SOCIAL PROFITS | Should social profit organizations model themselves to be more like businesses? To those that say, “absolutely,” one author presents a brief list of demands that social profit organizations will need from everyone else in order to do so. (NWB, 12/14)


A day in the life of Darth Vader.

– Ciara 

New DCFPI report highlights need for education and training reforms

ECONOMY/DISTRICT
A new report by the DC Fiscal Policy Institute (DCFPI) looks at the challenges facing D.C. residents with lower levels of education in a growing economy. With unemployment highest among those without a college degree, the report, and some city officials, look toward expanding job training opportunities and a higher minimum wage as a way to weaken disparities. (WaPo, 10/15)

Although wages have increased for college-educated residents, they have dropped for those with only a high school diploma. “Wages have fallen $2 an hour since 1980 for residents with a high school diploma, to just $13 an hour for the typical worker,” the report says. Over the same period, the pay for college-educated residents rose by $4.50 an hour, adjusted for inflation.

You can access the full report by DCFPI, “Two Paths to Better Jobs for DC Residents: Improved Training and Stronger Job Protections,”  here.

HOUSING
As D.C.’s Congress Heights neighborhood makes big plans for redevelopment, many longtime residents grow concerned about what the rapid changes will mean for their own futures. (WaPo, 10/15)

–  The Fundamental Contradictions of U.S. Housing Policy (City Lab, 10/14)

IMMIGRATION/VIRGINIA | In this article detailing the plight of unaccompanied minors who have been sent to live in the U.S., Virginia  is highlighted as just one example of the ways in which states vary widely on laws pertaining to their well-being. (Atlantic, 10/15)

COMMUNITY | Danielle Reyes has been named as the first-ever executive director for the Crimsonbridge Foundation based in Bethesda, MD. (WBJ, 10/14)

ARTS
– The Cultural Data Project, which many local arts organizations are familiar with as the online tool used to track financial, operations, and financial data, is re-branding as DataArts. Check out their press release to learn more.

– After 20 years in its current location, the Goethe-Institut Washington will move to a new home in D.C. The German cultural center cites rising rental costs as the reason behind the move. (WCP, 10.13)

ENVIRONMENT | How Green Can the District Grow (Elevation, 10/6)

SOCIAL PROFITS | ProInspire, a social profit, leadership development organization, is launching an executive coaching program for leaders at social sector organizations in Washington, D.C. Click here to learn more about the program. 


For today’s history lesson – How did these Bethesda neighborhoods get their names?

– Ciara