Tag: Virginia

Study examines the impact of ‘adultification’ on black girls

RACIAL EQUITY | Building on research that shows adults view young black girls as older and less innocent than their white peers, the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Georgetown University Law Center has affirmed the findings in its 2017 study through interviews with black girls and women ages 12 to 60 in towns and cities of various sizes across the United States. (WAMU, 5/16)

Through focus groups, researchers learned that young black girls are routinely subject to adultification bias, where black girls between the ages of 5 and 9 are perceived as being much older than they actually are … which contributes to harsher punishments in school and fewer leadership and mentorship opportunities. Among the solutions discussed is the idea that improving cultural competency and gender-responsiveness can help educators better understand black girls … “Change can only come when we add action to the data” says Rebecca Epstein, the center’s executive director… “We all have a responsibility once we know this information to start changing the landscape for black girls.”

CENSUS 2020 | Four of the nation’s most prominent foundations have committed millions to ensure a complete and accurate tally in the 2020 census, and are calling on other grantmakers to provide funding as well. (Chronicle, 5/15 – Subscription)

Related: WRAG is co-convening, along with 14 funders and other institutions, a day-long forum called Interventions That Work: Census 2020 & Hard-to-Reach Communities. The event will bring together the public, private, and nonprofit sectors to bridge the gap between information and action necessary to enable an accurate census. Learn more and register here.

EDUCATION
– Opinion: Montgomery County should let kids ride free to school  (GGWash, 5/17)

– Sixty-five years after Brown V. Board of Education, Montgomery County schools are  still trying to desegregate. (Bethesda Magazine, 5/16)

ENVIRONMENT
– The Potomac-Chesapeake Dolphin Project is looking for the public to help name two dolphins that live in the Potomac River. (WaPo, 5/17)

– States take steps to strengthen environmental regulations, widening the rift between stringent state policies and the administration’s deregulatory agenda. (WaPo, 5/19)

HOUSING
HUD Rule Targeting Immigrant Families Could Evict 55,000 Children (CityLab, 5/10)

– Opinion: The region has built a lot of housing – but not enough, and not in the right places (GGWash, 5/16)

VIRGINIA | Amazon Announces Plans For Arlington HQ2 Campus (dcist, 5/17)

TRANSIT | The DC Council is going to consider citizen parking enforcers to address parking challenges. (WaPo, 5/19)

ARTS  | New DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Director Claps Back (Afro, 5/16)

NONPROFITS | Philanthropy critic Anand Giridharadas writes that nonprofits should interrogate themselves on how the money that is fueling them was made. (NYT, 5/16)

PHILANTHROPY | Giving by Women’s Funds Has Soared. And They’re Getting More Savvy and Strategic (Inside Philanthropy, 5/14)


The new Spy Museum in the District highlights the past and takes on current day affairs.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday and Friday!

– Buffy

A disproportionate number of black people are arrested in the District for minor violations

JUSTICE/RACIAL EQUITY | A study from two watchdog groups has found that a disproportionate number of black people are arrested in the District for minor violations, including driving without a license, gambling, and smoking marijuana in public. The disparities are spread across the District and not limited to wards with high crime rates. (WaPo, 5/14)

The study was done by the DC office of the American Civil Liberties Union and a consortium of groups advocating transparency called Open the Government and is based on five years of arrest statistics … and says blacks accounted for 86 percent of the total arrests over the years examined, even though they make up slightly less than half of the District’s population … The disparity held true across 90 percent of the District’s census tracts “including the whitest parts of the city.”

HEALTHCARE | Kaiser Permanente is rolling out Thrive Local, a digital care coordination platform that makes it easier for its medical providers to connect patients to community-based social services. (NPQ, 5/8)

HOUSING
– Mayor Bowser calls for equitably distributing affordable housing and for creating enough overall housing. (GGWash, 5/13)

– ‘Build More Housing’ Is No Match for Inequality (CityLab, 5/9)

GENTRIFICATION
– The District’s Ivy City neighborhood is rapidly gentrifying and trying to preserve a sense of community. (WaPo, 5/4)

– After #DontMuteDC, this year’s Funk Parade is a call to action (WaPo, 5/11)

COMMUNITY | Alice M. Rivlin, a master of budgetary and fiscal policy who, among many roles, was an advocate for healthy communities, passed away yesterday at age 88. (WaPo, 5/14)

PUBLIC SAFETY | Lead in the District’s water is still a problem. Will the DC Council fund a plan to fix it? (GGWash, 5/13)

MARYLAND/VIRGINIA | According to an annual “Best States” survey, Maryland and Virginia are among the nation’s best states based on metrics including education, health care, the economy and public safety. (US News & World Report, 5/14)

PHILANTHROPY | Dozens of giving circles in the US recently met in Seattle to share stories, hopes and plans for building a stronger giving circle movement. (Philanthropy Women, 5/2)


Meet the “Bee Lady” of Capitol Hill

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Is the solution to the District’s housing crisis to invest in the middle class?

HOUSING | A strategy to produce and preserve workforce housing is gaining support among elected officials and developers to address the affordable housing shortage in the District. (WAMU, 5/2)

In her proposed 2020 budget, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has called for the creation of an unprecedented $20 million “workforce housing” fund that would subsidize homes affordable to middle-income professionals like teachers, social workers, and first responders… Many developers applaud the mayor’s workforce fund, saying it will help incentivize builders to construct and preserve housing that isn’t market-rate or “luxury.” Businesses tend to like it, too, because they want to be where the workforce lives. But the applause is countered by critics who say the mayor should instead invest that $20 million in low-income housing — particularly public housing, an estimated third of which is currently uninhabitable due to hazardous conditions.

EDUCATION | Prince George’s County may become the first jurisdiction in the country to use a public-private partnership to build and maintain several of its public schools, to speed up construction and decrease debt. (WaPo, 5/5)

LGBTQIA+ | Transgender teens in schools with bathroom restrictions are at higher risk of sexual assault, study says (CNN, 5/6)

WORKFORCE
– This co-working space doubles as a child care center. (WAMU, 5/6)

– Participants in a District workforce development program have not received the training they expected and are still unemployed. (CP, 5/2)

PRISON REFORM
– The District is looking into how it might obtain local control over the parole system again. (DCist, 5/1)

Maryland just banned placing pregnant inmates in solitary confinement. Yes, that was apparently happening. (WaPo, 5/1)

VIRGINIA | Fairfax board adopts budget with more for affordable housing, environment (WaPo, 3/7)

DISTRICT | The DC Inspector General says the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs has failed to track and collect on fines from businesses, developers and landlords who break the rules. (WAMU, 3/7)

COMMUNITY | Congrats to Natalie Madeira Cofield, founder & CEO of Walker’s Legacy and the Walker’s Legacy Foundation, for being named the Women in Business Champion of the Year by the DC Chamber of Commerce. (Walker’s Legacy Foundation is a fiscally-sponsored project of WRAG.)

PHILANTHROPY | New CEO at Council on Foundations Pledges Greater Accountability (Chronicle, 5/1)


Sleep in a ‘Glamping Globe’ on the roof of the Watergate? Yes please.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday!

– Buffy

The District is preparing for the future through a new resilience strategy

RESILIENCE
– Washington, DC is one of a number of cities developing ‘resilience strategies’ to prepare for future threats like extreme heat, economic downturn, cyberattacks, automation, carbon pollution, health disparities and violence. The Resilient DC strategy, released Monday, also includes two focus areas: equity in government and resilient rivers. (WAMU, 4/30)

In the year 2080, the sea level on the Potomac River and Anacostia River will be more than three feet higher than it is currently. There will be twice as many heat emergency days as there were in 2018 — meaning nearly the entire summer will feature days with a heat index over 95 degrees. What’s known as a “hundred-year” storm will happen every 20 years… Besides climate change, the resilience strategy contains a broad range of goals — from closing the educational achievement gap, to building more housing, to hiring hundreds more police officers and deploying them on foot, bike, Segway and scooter.

Click here to read the Resilient DC strategy.

Related Op-ed: The nation’s capital is focused on efforts to thrive in the face of climate change, inequality and technological disruption (US News, 1/3)

HOMELESSNESS | Homelessness has dropped for the third straight year in the District, led by a reduction in family homelessness. Homelessness has also decreased in Montgomery County, but risen in Fairfax County and Falls Church. (WaPo, 5/1)

EDUCATION/YOUTH | Rodney Robinson, this year’s National Teacher of the Year, has been teaching for 19 years, including at a juvenile detention center in Richmond, and says his “kids are in survival mode”. (NPR, 4/30)

MARYLAND | Del. Adrienne Jones becomes first African American, first woman to serve as Maryland House speaker (WaPo, 5/1)

VIRGINIA | Fairfax moves toward more affordable housing, pay raises with new budget (WaPo, 4/30)

RACISM | A brief history of the enduring phony science that perpetuates white supremacy (WaPo, 4/30)

ART 4,026 Straws Were Collected In One River Cleanup. Now, They’re Art! (WAMU, 4/29)

TRANSIT | Neglecting the region’s bus system may hurt the local economy. (WTOP, 4/29)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Director of Communications, Technology, and Administration | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers – New!
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers – New!
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter – New!
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute – New!
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


This is fun – how to find edible plants and mushrooms in urban places

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday!

– Buffy

Fairfax County plans to invest millions to boost affordable housing

HOUSING
– Fairfax County officials are discussing new plans to strengthen investments in affordable housing programs in fiscal year 2020. They also plan to increase spending right now to $15 million to help developers pursue affordable housing projects, and to hire a new “housing in all policies coordinator” who will manage the county’s efforts. (WBJ, 4/29)

Those changes are merely the first stage of a broader effort to meet the recommendations of a task force studying the county’s housing needs. That group wants to see Fairfax add 5,000 new homes affordable to people making 60 percent or less of the area median income — that would apply to anyone making an annual salary of at least $46,350 — over the next 15 years. To meet that goal, the board is directing county staff to draft “innovative land use policies” to expand affordable housing projects, running the gamut from new density bonuses to more flexible parking requirements.

– As the number of families with multiple generations living under one roof is rising, home builders are focusing on extended families. (WAMU, 4/24)

Should cities subsidize housing for a family making $141,000? (WaPo, 4/29)

VIRGINIA | Amazon posts first jobs for HQ2, says project is ‘ahead of schedule’ (WaPo, 4/29)

LGBTQIA+/EDUCATION | The school boards in Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, and Arlington are supporting the rights of transgender students, weighing in on a case involving a teenager’s legal fight over his attempt to use the boys’ restroom at his high school. (WaPo, 4/29)

IMMIGRATION | Trump tightens asylum rules, will make immigrants pay fees to seek humanitarian refuge (WaPo, 4/30)

ENVIRONMENT | Global Inequality Is 25% Higher Due to Climate Instability (Truthout, 4/27)

HATE/JUSTICE | One day after Passover ended, an interfaith group gathered at the All Dulles Area Muslim Society to celebrate at an event that featured a moment of silence — and a continued resolve to counter hatred — after Saturday’s deadly shooting at a California synagogue. (WTOP, 4/29)

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS | Arlington plan for managing mass casualties is first in nation (WTOP, 4/29)

GUN VIOLENCE | Newtown Wasn’t an End for Gun Control. It Was a Beginning. (NYT, 4/29)

PHILANTHROPY | How Philanthropy Can Curb the Rise of Hate: Count It, Condemn it, Confront It (Chronicle, 4/29)


Interesting visual of 25 years of sprawl in Northern Virginia.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday!

– Buffy

Lack of foster parents in DC puts vulnerable children at risk

CHILDREN/FAMILIES | There is a shortage of foster parents in DC, which child welfare advocates say is putting children at risk of harm. Some children have even had to sleep at the office of DC’s Child and Family Services Agency while they waited to be placed in a home. (WAMU, 4/8)

“We’ve seen cases where kids have been exposed to a lot of violence, have been physically hurt, but have remained in their homes … because there are not enough foster homes right now” … the shortage has been caused in part by increased housing costs, experienced foster parents retiring, and changing demographics in the city. A spokesperson for DC’s Child and Family Service Agency says they are looking to add 40 new beds in the foster care system over this fiscal year … and specifically have a shortage of parents for children with special needs and for older children.

Related: Last year, WRAG’s president Tamara Copeland, urged philanthropy to focus on the child welfare system, a topic that is often invisible to many in our region. (Daily, 9/2018)

ARTS & CULTURE
– DC’s first-ever cultural plan lays out a strategy for growth through investments, infrastructure and programming. The plan was developed by the DC Office of Planning, in consultation with the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the DC Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment – and includes input from over 1,500 artists, art consumers, and experts from the cultural sector. (WAMU, 4/4)

– The owner of Bethesda’s Union Hardware is promoting a plan to open a collective art studio in downtown Bethesda for up to 30 artists by this summer. (Bethesda Magazine, 4/3)

ECONOMIC INEQUALITY | America’s growing geographic divide derives from economic inequality, especially the tremendous gains of the one percent. (CityLab, 4/3)

EDUCATION
– DC’s Low-Income Neighborhood Schools Are Losing Money. Is The Budget Or Enrollment To Blame? (WAMU, 4/5)

– In Montgomery County, a $5.7 billion budget proposal is being questioned by those who want to see more money focused on education. (WaPo, 4/7)

MARYLAND | Mike Busch, the longest-serving state House speaker in Maryland history who helped shepherd laws that improved access to health care and legalized same-sex marriage, died on April 7 at age 72. (WaPo, 4/7)

VIRGINIA | As Amazon builds and staffs up HQ2, other tech companies who orbit them could follow. (WBJ, 4/4)

FOOD | Hungry, a new Arlington-based healthy food delivery service, has received star-powered support. (WAMU, 4/5)

PHILANTHROPY | The Road Ahead: Will Philanthropic Critique Change Philanthropic Practice? (NPQ, 4/4)


How would you improve the Metro map when it’s reprinted?

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday and Friday!

– Buffy

DC to open new middle school in growing Northwest neighborhood

EDUCATION
– In recent years District leaders closed more than a dozen schools because of low enrollment, but now a new middle school underscores the city’s strategy for retaining students in neighborhood schools. (WaPo, 3/26)

…A booming corner of the city is getting its second new middle school in recent years. The opening of the campus in Northwest reflects a strategy to bolster middle schools so families will stick around to attend public high schools.

The arrival of the campus in Takoma — the school, adjacent to Coolidge High, is part of a broader $150 million overhaul of the Coolidge campus — comes as middle schools and high schools in other neighborhoods sit with ample vacant seats.

In the Takoma, Brightwood and Manor Park neighborhoods, city leaders saw an opportunity for growth. The school system studied population trends with the D.C. Office of Planning and determined that the cluster of neighborhoods is poised for one of the biggest population growths in the city over the next seven years, bolstered by the arrival of immigrant and young affluent families.

Arlington Public Schools Developing an Implementation Plan for Transgender Non-Discrimination Policy (ARLNow, 3/27)

VIRGINIA/RACE | Virginia Governor Ralph Northam amended two motorist measures in the state budget with ‘race inequities’ in mind. (WaPo, 3/26)

HOUSING 
Mayor’s budget proposes slight increase for DC police, more money for programs that treat violence as health issue (WaPo, 3/26)

– According to a new report, the “vast majority” of dollars raised by DC elected officials through private donations to help District residents are not spent as intended. (WaPo, 3/26)

HOMELESSNESS | Employed full-time and experiencing homelessness in the Washington region: the changing face of homelessness. (WaPo, 3/22)

GUN VIOLENCE | Bump Stock Ban Takes Effect As Gun Rights Groups Ask Supreme Court For Delay (NPR, 3/26)

PUBLIC SAFETY | DC Police Reported A 20 Percent Increase In Use-Of-Force Incidents Last Year (dcist, 3/25)

GENDER | Teen boys rated their female classmates based on looks. The girls fought back. (WaPo, 3/26)

PHILANTHROPY | The Sweetness of Circles highlights the history, strength and growth of black-led giving circles. (Medium, 3/25)


How to cycle, drink, and cruise down the Potomac!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday this week!

– Buffy

Study finds over 20,000 Black DC residents displaced between 2000 and 2013

HOUSING/RACIAL EQUITY
– According to a just-released study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, approximately 40 percent of the District’s lower-income neighborhoods experienced gentrification between 2000 and 2013. The city also saw the most African American residents displaced from their neighborhoods during that time, giving DC the greatest “intensity of gentrification” of any city in the country. (WaPo, 3/19)

More than 20,000 residents were displaced from their neighborhoods by mostly affluent, white newcomers, which is part of the intensity ranking, where “you feel it and you see it,” said Jesse Van Tol, chief executive of the NCRC, a research and advocacy coalition of 600 community organizations that promote economic and racial justice. “It’s the visibility and the pace of it.”

– DC families living in public housing face ongoing health issues. (CP, 3/20)

HOMELESSNESS | Victims of domestic violence are particularly vulnerable to homelessness. (WaPo, 3/30)

VIRGINIA | Opinion: Don’t underestimate Amazon HQ2’s importance (WBJ, 3/21)

CHILD CARE | Mayor Bowser has proposed building three new early education centers for kids aged four, which could create more than 500 new openings. (WAMU, 3/21)

GENDER/EQUITY | The National Museum of Women in the Arts will host its annual Art+Feminism edit-a-thon to improve Wikipedia entries about notable women artists to help improve the site’s gender imbalance. (WAMU, 3/22)

EDUCATION | This school in the District had a high pregnancy rate, so it opened a day care for students, which helped to decrease pregnancies and increase its graduation rate. (EdSurge, 3/15)

COMMUNITY | The Greater Washington Good Business Awards ​ is accepting applications through Friday, April 5.

PHILANTHROPY/RACE | The recently released study, Women Give 2019: Gender and Giving Across Communities of Color, found that race has little impact on giving. (Chronicle, 3/19 – Subscription)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Program Specialist | Jack and Jill Foundation – New!
Program Manager | Weissberg Foundation – New!
Director of Development Partnerships – New England | League of Conservation Voters – New!
Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation
Grants Management Associate | Wellspring Philanthropic Fund
Program Manager | DC127
Development Manager  | DC127
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase
Northern Virginia Community Affairs Liaison | CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
Programs Officer | DC Bar Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


How is your March Madness bracket looking this morning? Catch all the fun today online!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday next week!

– Buffy

Childcare and early education expanding in Montgomery County to help close the achievement gap

EDUCATION | Members of the Montgomery County Council and County Executive Marc Elrich are working together to expand the number of seats in childcare and early education centers. The ambitious plan was unveiled on Thursday to make childcare and early education more readily available and more affordable for children up to age five. (WAMU, 3/7)

It starts with a $7 million funding commitment in the upcoming budget. “This has serious long-term implications for education and for the wellbeing of the children, so starting early with kids has to be our priority,” Elrich said. “All young children should have the opportunity to thrive and develop to their full potential, and a child’s outcome should not be determined by race or economic status. Without early childhood education, it’s hard to close those gaps.”

PUBLIC SAFETY | DC auditor says city needs a new jail to replace ‘aging and deteriorating’ facility (WaPo, 3/4)

VIRGINIA | Arlington officials have provided more details about the incentive package for Amazon and how the company can earn $23 million in grants. (ARLnow, 3/5)

RACISM
Why Blackface Keeps Popping Up (NPQ, 3/6)

– High school students at Sidwell Friends School showed swastikas and other derogatory terms during an assembly this week. (WaPo, 3/7)

PHILANTHROPY | Exploring the Problem of Black “Movement Capture” by White-Dominated Philanthropy (NPQ, 3/1)

HEALTH
– According to a new report, the fertility rate in the country has been declining, and women in the District are waiting longer than women elsewhere to have babies, if they have them at all. The report released by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics found that while all states have seen a decline, DC ranks at the very bottom. (WAMU, 3/4)

DISTRICT | A new Busboys and Poets is scheduled to open next week in Anacostia. (City Paper, 3/6)

EQUITY | How Federal Disaster Money Favors The Rich (NPR, 3/5)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Program Manager | DC127 – New!
Development Manager  | DC127 – New!
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase
Northern Virginia Community Affairs Liaison | CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Foundation and Government Relations Officer​ | ​Shakespeare Theatre Company
Executive Director​ | ​VHC Medical Brigade
Director of Development​ | ​DC Bar Foundation
Programs Officer | DC Bar Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Great Google Doodle today for International Women’s Day.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Monday, Wednesday and Friday next week!

– Buffy

Upcoming Kirwan Commission recommendations to address educational inequality in Maryland

MARYLAND/RACIAL EQUITY
– Hundreds of millions of dollars in education funding may soon bolster Maryland schools if lawmakers can agree on how to divide the money. The Kirwan Commission, or the State’s Commission on Educational Excellence, will soon present its final recommendations for the new school funding model to lawmakers in Annapolis. (WAMU, 2/25)

In 2016, Governor Hogan called for the formation of the 25-member Kirwan Commission to address the gap in funding for public schools. This comes at a time when one study said Maryland is the 15th worst state in terms of regressive education funding … “meaning that districts with high proportions of low-income students receive less funding than schools serving wealthier communities” said William Kirwan, chair of the commission.

 

– With the release of a new report on equity in Prince George’s County solutions have been proposed to move the county toward equity and equality for communities of color. (Prince Georges Sentinel, 2/20)

VIRGINIA/RACIAL EQUITY
Confederate flag incident at Virginia high school sparks concern of racist behavior (WaPo, 2/24)

– Virginia state superintendent says schools must address racism in light of recent scandals. (WTOP, 2/25)

–  Swastikas have been found at three sites in past week in Virginia, in what appears to be three separate hate crime incidents. (WaPo, 2/26)

HOUSING
– The Virginia General Assembly recently passed hundreds of bills, including one that gives residents an extra two weeks to pay rent that is past due and one focused on eviction reform. (WAMU, 2/22)

 – There’s No Such Thing as a Dangerous Neighborhood (CityLab, 2/25)

GUN VIOLENCE | Maryland lawmakers heard from family members affected by gun violence as well as gun-rights supporters in Annapolis on ‘gun day’ in Annapolis. (WTOP, 2/25)

BUSINESS | The proposal to raise the minimum wage in Maryland to $15 has different opinions among the business community. (WAMU,  2/22)

PHILANTHROPY
– “Donors InVesting in the Arts,” or “DIVAs,” is a giving circle managed by the Greater Washington Community Foundation that is promoting civic engagement through the arts. (GWCF, 2/21)

– Funder support for media research has been growing as evidenced by the Knight Foundation’s recent commitment of $300 million to support local journalism. (Chronicle, 2/19 – Subscription)


“Plant-based” is so the new vegan.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy