Tag: This week in immigration

Friday roundup – June 8 through June 12, 2015

THIS WEEK IN PHILANTHROPY
– This week, WRAG president Tamara Copeland critiqued a recent NY Times op-ed on the lack of oversight of philanthropy. (Daily, 6/8)

THIS WEEK IN HOUSING
– Studies show that many of the fears that residents of more affluent communities sometimes have over building affordable housing in close proximity to their homes never become reality. (Atlantic, 6/2)

– Data from the D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer explored why people move in and out of the District. Not surprisingly, housing issues were a major factor in choosing to move out. (WSJ, 6/9)

– A much-needed affordable housing facility specifically geared toward LGBT seniors will soon break ground in the District. (Elevation, 6/8)

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS/IMMIGRATION
– A new film explores the stories of undocumented youth in D.C., sharing the challenges they have faced as immigrants. (WCP, 6/10)


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK

Developing Your Point of View on Philanthropy – Presented by Exponent Philanthropy and Wells Fargo Private Bank in partnership with WRAG (Open to foundation donors, trustees, and staff; individual donors; donor advised fund holders; members of giving circles)
Tuesday, June 16   9:30 am – 12:00 pm (At Wells Fargo – 1300 I Street NW, 11th Floor)

Foundation Finance Affinity Group: Navigating Private Foundation Excise Tax Rules (WRAG member/prospective member CFOs and finance staff)
Thursday, June 18   10:00 am – 12:00 pm (At WRAG)


Can you match these presidential candidates to the number one song that topped the charts when they announced?

– Ciara

Friday roundup – April 13 through April 17, 2015

THIS WEEK IN BUDGETS/REGION
– This week, we heard from leading fiscal policy experts on the 2016 federal, District, and Virginia budgets and what priorities they may bring to the forefront for funders in the region. We’ll hear more on Maryland’s budget soon. In the meantime, you can get caught up on on the posts from Robert Greenstein of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Michael Cassidy of The Commonwealth Institute, and Ed Lazere of the DC Fiscal Policy Institute. (Daily, 4/13, 4/14, and 4/15)

THIS WEEK IN RACIAL EQUITY
– Foundation Center and the Campaign for Black Male Achievement released a new report analyzing U.S. foundation funding for organizations and programs focused on improving the life outcomes of black men and boys. (BMAfunders, 4/14)

THIS WEEK IN AFFORDABLE HOUSING
– The D.C. Council introduced a resolution to strengthen the city’s Inclusionary Zoning program in an effort to increase the stock of long-term affordable housing. (Coalition for Smarter Growth, 4/14)

THIS WEEK IN IMMIGRATION
– The Commonwealth Institute examined the role unauthorized immigrants can play in Virginia’s economy. (Commonwealth Institute, 4/16)

– D.C. Area’s Safety Net For Immigrant Children Is Stretched Thin, Report Says (WAMU, 4/14)

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH
– According to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Arlington County was found to be one of only 10 counties in the U.S that had declining numbers of diabetes cases between the years 2004 and 2012. (WaPo, 4/13)

Childhood trauma may raise risk of type 1 diabetes (Reuters, 4/15)


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK
The Fundamentals of CSR: A Two Day-Workshop
Thursday, April 23, 2015 – Friday, April 24, 2015

Washington Regional Food Funders: Second Quarterly Meeting (Interested WRAG members should contact Lindsay Smith for an agenda and to RSVP if they haven’t already done so)
Thursday, April 23, 2015   10:00 AM – 12:00 PM


 

How can you tell if your dog really loves you? It’s all in the gaze.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – March 9 through March 13, 2015

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
New plans for D.C. Public Schools under their new budget were announced this week. While a number of cuts will be made at the central office, four new schools will be opened, and additional programming is expected to be introduced to students. (WaPo, 3/12)

D.C. Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson announced Thursday that after years of school closures, D.C. Public Schools plans to open four next year and will hire 200 new school-based staff members. Many of the new employees will work in the city’s comprehensive high schools, offering a more expansive and consistent range of extracurricular activities and advanced courses citywide.

The budget aims to improve equity as school leaders push to persuade more families to choose neighborhood schools. City public school enrollment continues to grow overall, but many families have been choosing public charters or schools across town through a citywide lottery.

The system is projecting a fourth straight year of increased enrollment, with more than 1,500 new students next year, putting enrollment at more than 49,000.

– A Schott Foundation for Public Education report showed that Montgomery County leads the country’s large urban school districts in graduation rates for black male students. In 2012, three out of every four black male students in the district had earned a high school diploma. (Gazette, 3/4)

THIS WEEK IN AFFORDABLE HOUSING
– David Bowers of Enterprise Community Partners was a guest on the WPFW’s Business Matters show and spoke on the housing affordability crisis affecting the city. Audio from the interview is available here. (WPFW, 3/9 [at the 4:30 minute mark])

– County planners in Arlington look ahead to the year 2020 – when market-rate affordable housing could become a thing of the past. The Board is working on an Affordable Housing Master Plan that could be adopted in July. (ARLnow, 3/10)

Median rental price for a one-bedroom D.C. apartment is $2,000, study says (WaPo, 3/12)

THIS WEEK IN FOOD 
– WRAG’s Washington Regional Food Funders consultant Lindsay Smith shared her takeaways from the recent National Anti-Hunger Policy Conference, and discussed the importance of protecting federal nutrition programs. (Daily, 3/10)

– Wage stagnation and unemployment, combined with rising rents and food costs, gave way to a sharp rise in requests for food assistance in the region last year. Many are finding that putting fresh, nutritious food on the table is still no easy task. (WaPo, 3/10)

Why Some Schools Serve Local Food And Others Can’t (Or Won’t) (NPR, 3/11)

THIS WEEK IN IMMIGRATION
Opinion: Why pro-immigration states are fighting back (WaPo, 3/12)

– NPR interviewed a local teen who fled violence in Central America. (NPR, 3/9)

Related: On Tuesday, March 31 at 9:00 AM, WRAG members and invited guests can attend a funder briefing on Immigration Relief and the Impact on the D.C. Region. The special event, sponsored by a number of WRAG members, will be moderated by Rose Ann Cleveland of The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, and  includes remarks by Cecilia Muñoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council; a panel with Gustavo Torres, executive director of CASA; DJ Yoon, executive director of the National Korean American Services & Education Consortium; and Maya, immigrant leader and potential beneficiary.


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK
How Philanthropic Leadership Changed The Equation for Returning Veterans in San Diego (WRAG members)
Wednesday, March 18, 2015  12:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Institute for CSR: Session 2: Investing in Communities (Institute for CSR Class of 2015)
Thursday, March 19, 2015  9:00 AM – Friday, March 20, 2015  5:00 PM

The Anacostia River: A Challenge and Opportunity for Philanthropy (WRAG members and other invited funders)
Thursday, March 19, 2015 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM


America is so young, it only takes four presidents to trace back to the Founding Fathers.

– Ciara