Tag: This Week in Education

Friday roundup – March 28 through April 1, 2016

THIS WEEK IN HOUSING
– This week, NPR plunged into issues surrounding affordable housing (or lack thereof), in cities like Washington, D.C., with stories about tenants facing eviction and facing off in court with their landlords, and low-income renters in the District struggling to get by. NPR‘s local housing stories from this week can be found here, here, here, and here.

Finding an affordable anchor in D.C.’s wave of gentrification (WaPo, 3/29)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– The Loudoun County School Board compromised on a controversial proposal that would have concentrated mostly low-income, Hispanic students into two schools, reminding many of separate-but-equal policies of the past. (Loudoun Times,  3/29)

– A new study was released, examining how race plays a role in influencing a teacher’s expectations for their students’ potential for academic success. (WaPo, 3/31)

THIS WEEK IN SOCIAL PROFITS
Audio: CECP Chief Executive Officer Daryl Brewster shares advice on ways the social profit sector and corporations can partner more effectively and offers his vision for the future of corporate social responsibility. (Chronicle, 3/25)

– 7 Pitfalls to Avoid When Building a Diverse Nonprofit Staff (Chronicle, 3/30) Subscription required


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


It’s April Fool’s Day, so here’s your guide for navigating the next several hours.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – March 21 through March 25, 2016

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
Reflections on implicit bias were shared by Board Chair Missy Young and lead staffer Dara Johnson from the Horning Family Fund. (Daily 3/24)

– The Consumer Health Foundation‘s Kendra Allen interviewed Sequnely Gray, Community Engagement Coordinator for So Others Might Eat and a TANF recipient, about her experience advocating for families on TANF and the impact of benefit time limits. (CHF, 3/21)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION/REGION
– A new report found significant racial disparities in the acceptance rates among selective academic programs at public schools in Montgomery County. (WaPo, 3/22)

 In Loudoun County, a proposal that would concentrate mostly low-income, majority Hispanic students into two schools is evoking memories of “separate but equal” policies of the past. (WaPo, 3/20) 

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH
–  Grantmakers in Health, with support from the Aetna Foundation, released a supplement on health equity innovations, published with the spring 2016 edition of the Stanford Social Innovation Review. The supplement highlights promising strategies and emerging approaches for building healthy, equitable, and sustainable communities. (SSIR, spring 2016)

–  OpinionThe color of heroin addiction — why war then, treatment now? (WaPo, 3/23)

THIS WEEK IN CSR
 The deadline to apply for the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards is Friday, April 1. Hint for Nonprofits: Nominating your corporate partners is a great way to show your appreciation and deepen your relationship!

Related: Interested in learning how to build new, stronger, and more mutually beneficial corporate partnerships? Join WRAG and more than 20 CSR professionals from some of the region’s top companies for the 2016 Fundamentals of CSR workshop on April 14-15.


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Are you #TeamPancakes or #TeamWaffles? Personally, I found both to be far too filling.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – February 8 through 12, 2016

The Daily WRAG will return on Tuesday, February 16.

THIS WEEK AT WRAG
– WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland shared why WRAG is pursuing a culture of evaluation and will use your feedback to continue providing quality programming that enhances philanthropy and improves the region. (Daily, 2/11)

THIS WEEK IN PHILANTHROPY | Opinion: It’s Not Foundation Money, But Culture and Talent That Can Change The World (Chronicle, 2/10)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– Officials of D.C. Public Schools announced an overhaul of the district’s teacher training and evaluation system. The changes will take begin this fall. (WaPo, 2/10)

THIS WEEK IN HOUSING
– A growing number of residents in the area are finding housing to be so expensive that they’re considering a move to the Baltimore area – even with long commuting times into the District for work. (WAMU, 2/9) Audio

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS
– You can take a sneak peek inside the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Renwick Gallery has reopened to a big audience and even bigger digital success. (Washingtonian, 2/5)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


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A simple guide to Valentine’s Day chocolate-buying.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – January 19 through 22, 2016

THIS WEEK IN PHILANTHROPY
In an op-ed in the Chronicle of Philanthropy, Tamara Lucas Copeland challenged the notion of a postracial America and explained why WRAG is working to foster a better understanding among funders about the dynamics of racism. (Chronicle, 1/21)

– The Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers, the Council of New Jersey Grantmakers, and the Center for Disaster Philanthropy partnered to release the Disaster Philanthropy Playbook, a comprehensive resource to help philanthropy respond to future disasters.

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– Maryland saw a record high of close to 880,000 students this school year – a 5,000 student increase from the previous school year. Most of the surge in student enrollment was in Montgomery, Howard, Baltimore, Prince George’s, and Anne Arundel counties. (WaPo, 1/ 20)

 Recommendations to close or consolidate several schools in Prince George’s County have brought members of the community together to oppose the possible changes. (WaPo, 1/17)

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
Do you want to celebrate the fact that you are already a part of the “IN” crowd and encourage others, too? You’re already a change agent in the region, right? Now let’s celebrate that. In keeping with the theme of WRAG’s 2015 Annual Meeting, “Philanthropy All In,” where we shared the ways we sought to INfluence, INnovate, and INspire in 2015, we’d like to see how you plan to carry on that theme in the new year and beyond. Take a selfie, group photo, or get creative showing off the buttons we gave out at the annual meeting. Be sure to share where you wore it and how others reacted. Tweet us @WRAGtweets and use the hashtag #theINcrowd to join us in celebrating each other’s work! Check out how WRAG’s staff is already getting IN on the action:

Don’t have a button, but want to get INvolved? Ask for one the next time you see a member of WRAG’s staff at a meeting or event!


 

WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Bei Bei recently made his first public appearance. See how much you know about pandas in honor of the occasion.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – January 4 through January 8, 2016

THIS WEEK IN HOUSING
– WRAG and Enterprise Community Loan Fund made a major announcement about a new impact investing initiative to support affordable housing here in our region. Click here to read more about Our Region, Your Investment.

– For many millennial workers homeownership in the Greater Washington region is simply out of reach. (WaPo, 1/4)

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY 
– Ed Davies, Executive Director of the DC Trust, has announced that he will be stepping down from his post in order to pursue a new opportunity and continue working on behalf of children, youth, and families.

– The Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation has announced two new staff members, along with some other changes to their team. Julian A. Haynes and Amy Nakamoto will join Meyer as program officers on January 19.  Karen FitzGerald has been promoted from senior program officer to program director, and Maegan Scott has been promoted to serve as program officer for Meyer’s new Organizational Effectiveness Program and other capacity-building work.

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
The Rise of Urban Public Boarding Schools (Atlantic, 12/2015)

THIS WEEK IN PHILANTHROPY
The Chronicle of Philanthropy released this year’s list of 40 leaders under 40 who are working to solve entrenched problems with innovative solutions. (Chronicle, 1/5)

– A  first-of-its-kind philanthropy almanac, offering an abundance of data and facts about the field, is now available. (Chronicle, 1/6)

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS 
– As millennial philanthropy grows, how can arts and cultural social profit organizations be sure they are attracting this next generation of donors? (Seattle Times, 12/2015)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


It may be too cold to visit the beach these days, but next time you go, you’ll know exactly what’s across the ocean from you in the horizon.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – December 7 through December 11, 2015

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION/ECONOMY
– Elected leaders from D.C., Maryland, and Virginia recently gathered and showed that they’re starting to think more regionally. (WaPo, 12/8)

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH
– In Maryland, hundreds of children are still being poisoned by lead paint each year, despite a public pledge to end poisoning by 2010. (WaPo, 12/8)

– When marketing healthy eating campaigns in rural communities, there are often a number of unique challenges that can arise. (City Lab, 12/9)

THIS WEEK IN HOUSING
– Why it’s so hard to afford a rental even if you make a decent salary (WaPo, 12/9)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– The Senate approved new education legislation known as the Every Student Succeeds Act that ends No Child Left Behind and gives states and local school districts more power over assessing the quality of their schools. (WaPo, 12/9)

– One way to boost achievement among poor kids? Make sure they have classmates who aren’t poor. (WaPo, 12/8)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Who says you can’t workout at work?

– Ciara 

Friday roundup – July 27 through July 31, 2015

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION
– The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors approved a redevelopment plan for the Seven Corners area. (WaPo, 7/29)

– The Montgomery County Council approved tax credits for low-income renters as the area looks to become more urban, but few people are expected to actually qualify. (WAMU, 7/29)

– Interview: Director of Arlington Economic Development Victor L. Hoskins talked about the future of the county and how it should rise to face the challenges that could prohibit future economic growth. (WaPo, 7/29)

THIS WEEK IN HIV/AIDS
– In a new report, the World Health Organization looked at the wide disparities in access to adequate health care for transgender individuals, often due to discrimination. (NPR, 7/26)

– The White House released an updated national strategy to continue the fight against HIV/AIDS. (White House, 7/30)

THIS WEEK IN HEALTHCARE
– This week, Medicare turned 50 years old. Check out how many people in our region are impacted by the program. (WBJ, 7/29)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– George Washington University joined a growing list of institutions that have recently decided to drop testing requirements for some freshman admissions in an effort to reduce barriers for disadvantaged students to attend. Some are worried whether the change will be enough to recruit low-income students. (WaPo, 7/27)


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK

Northern Virginia LEG: Streamline Your Grantmaking
Thursday, August 6  10:00 am to 12:00 pm


Take a look a these cool (but kind of terrifying) giant gummy bears

– Ciara

 

Friday roundup – June 1 through June 5, 2015

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
– Yesterday marked the 3rd annual Do More 24 day of giving hosted by United Way of the National Capital Area. The campaign raised well over $1.4 million for more than 600 nonprofits serving DC, Northern Virginia, and Montgomery and Prince George’s counties. A total of 11,394 donations were made through the online giving portal.

THIS WEEK IN SOCIAL JUSTICE
The Washington Post did a special report on the number of individuals fatally shot by police nationwide so far this year. The in-depth study found that the number is reaching 400 people. (WaPo, 5/30)

THIS WEEK IN RACIAL EQUITY
– The Washington Post also explored policies and programs geared specifically toward young men of color, and examined why they continue to remain so important for the future of the economy. (WaPo, 6/3)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– Research shows that there is not only a gap in the number of rich and poor students enrolling in college, there is also a gap in the rate at which they complete college – the “graduation gap.” (NYT, 6/2)

– The Economic Policy Institute reported that young female college graduates earn significantly lower wages than young male graduates. This, despite the fact that average wages for all young college graduates is 2.5 percent lower than it was 15 years ago. (EPI, 6/3)


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK

Preserving D.C.’s Safety Net (WRAG members)
Thursday, June 11  12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Get on the Map: A How-To Webinar
Thursday, June 11  2:00 pm – 2:45 pm


Here‘s a great cartoon visualization and short story on privilege.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – April 20 through April 24, 2015

THIS WEEK IN AGING/POVERTY
Many older Americans across the U.S. are experiencing food insecurity, a lingering effect of the Great Recession that has not yet shown signs of recovery for the growing senior population. According to a new report ranking each state’s percentage of seniors facing the threat of hunger, the Greater Washington region’s senior population is among those facing hard times. (WaPo, 4/23)

A new national report on food insecurity among older Americans ranks the District fourth, just behind Mississippi.

The report says that more than 20 percent of the District’s elderly have concerns about eating enough food or the right kind of food, compared with more than 24 percent of seniors in Mississippi.

The estimates of senior hunger range from about 8 percent in Minnesota to more than 26 percent in Arkansas, which was ranked highest among states where seniors face the threat of hunger. Virginia and Maryland both had rates of about 14 percent.

The Atlantic explored the economic inequalities that exist for many Americans well beyond retirement age, despite the shared experiences of growing older that most seniors endure. (Atlantic, 4/20)

THIS WEEK IN COMMUNITY/EVENTS
– Lynn Tadlock, Vice Chair of WRAG’s board and Deputy Executive Director of Giving at the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation, discussed the upcoming Loudoun County Philanthropy Conference on May 14 and how it aims to strengthen the “three-legged stool” of government, business, and the social sector to meet the often unnoticed needs of Loudoun County. (Daily, 4/22)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION/BUDGETS
– Prince George’s County braced itself for what could potentially be a $20 million loss in state school funding. (Gazette, 4/22)

D.C. schools budget includes wide range in per-student spending (WaPo, 4/23)

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION/ECONOMY
National Parks Brought $1.4 Billion to the D.C. Region in 2014 (DCist, 4/24)


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK

Northern Virginia LEG: The Art of Successful Site Visits (co-sponsored with Exponent Philanthropy and the Southeastern Council of Foundations)
Wednesday, April 29  10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Brightest Minds: Dr. Isabel Sawhill on Creating a New Ethic of Responsible Parenthood (WRAG members and non-members)
Thursday, April 30  9:30 AM – 11:30 AM (At PNC Bank)


Today is the Library of Congress’ 215th birthday! Find out what’s actually in there.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – March 9 through March 13, 2015

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
New plans for D.C. Public Schools under their new budget were announced this week. While a number of cuts will be made at the central office, four new schools will be opened, and additional programming is expected to be introduced to students. (WaPo, 3/12)

D.C. Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson announced Thursday that after years of school closures, D.C. Public Schools plans to open four next year and will hire 200 new school-based staff members. Many of the new employees will work in the city’s comprehensive high schools, offering a more expansive and consistent range of extracurricular activities and advanced courses citywide.

The budget aims to improve equity as school leaders push to persuade more families to choose neighborhood schools. City public school enrollment continues to grow overall, but many families have been choosing public charters or schools across town through a citywide lottery.

The system is projecting a fourth straight year of increased enrollment, with more than 1,500 new students next year, putting enrollment at more than 49,000.

– A Schott Foundation for Public Education report showed that Montgomery County leads the country’s large urban school districts in graduation rates for black male students. In 2012, three out of every four black male students in the district had earned a high school diploma. (Gazette, 3/4)

THIS WEEK IN AFFORDABLE HOUSING
– David Bowers of Enterprise Community Partners was a guest on the WPFW’s Business Matters show and spoke on the housing affordability crisis affecting the city. Audio from the interview is available here. (WPFW, 3/9 [at the 4:30 minute mark])

– County planners in Arlington look ahead to the year 2020 – when market-rate affordable housing could become a thing of the past. The Board is working on an Affordable Housing Master Plan that could be adopted in July. (ARLnow, 3/10)

Median rental price for a one-bedroom D.C. apartment is $2,000, study says (WaPo, 3/12)

THIS WEEK IN FOOD 
– WRAG’s Washington Regional Food Funders consultant Lindsay Smith shared her takeaways from the recent National Anti-Hunger Policy Conference, and discussed the importance of protecting federal nutrition programs. (Daily, 3/10)

– Wage stagnation and unemployment, combined with rising rents and food costs, gave way to a sharp rise in requests for food assistance in the region last year. Many are finding that putting fresh, nutritious food on the table is still no easy task. (WaPo, 3/10)

Why Some Schools Serve Local Food And Others Can’t (Or Won’t) (NPR, 3/11)

THIS WEEK IN IMMIGRATION
Opinion: Why pro-immigration states are fighting back (WaPo, 3/12)

– NPR interviewed a local teen who fled violence in Central America. (NPR, 3/9)

Related: On Tuesday, March 31 at 9:00 AM, WRAG members and invited guests can attend a funder briefing on Immigration Relief and the Impact on the D.C. Region. The special event, sponsored by a number of WRAG members, will be moderated by Rose Ann Cleveland of The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, and  includes remarks by Cecilia Muñoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council; a panel with Gustavo Torres, executive director of CASA; DJ Yoon, executive director of the National Korean American Services & Education Consortium; and Maya, immigrant leader and potential beneficiary.


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK
How Philanthropic Leadership Changed The Equation for Returning Veterans in San Diego (WRAG members)
Wednesday, March 18, 2015  12:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Institute for CSR: Session 2: Investing in Communities (Institute for CSR Class of 2015)
Thursday, March 19, 2015  9:00 AM – Friday, March 20, 2015  5:00 PM

The Anacostia River: A Challenge and Opportunity for Philanthropy (WRAG members and other invited funders)
Thursday, March 19, 2015 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM


America is so young, it only takes four presidents to trace back to the Founding Fathers.

– Ciara