Tag: theater

New report on investing in the good food system

FOOD
Arabella Advisors has released a new report, “Investing to Strengthen the Good Food Supply Chain,” and accompanying graphic, “On the Road to Good Food,” identifying areas where they believe capital investments can yield powerful investment returns and significant impact in expanding access to good food.

Developing the infrastructure to supply good food will require more than philanthropy alone can deliver. Most of the solutions we need must come from private-sector commitments—specifically, from investments in companies across the food supply chain that can bring more sustainable, healthy, and affordable food to market

CSR | The deadline to apply for the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards is Friday, April 1. Hint for Nonprofits: Nominating your corporate partners is a great way to show your appreciation and deepen your relationship!

Related: Interested in learning how to build new, stronger, and more mutually beneficial corporate partnerships? Join WRAG and more than 20 CSR professionals from some of the region’s top companies for the 2016 Fundamentals of CSR workshop on April 14-15.

HEALTHGrantmakers in Health, with support from the Aetna Foundation, recently released a supplement on health equity innovations, published in the spring 2016 edition of the Stanford Social Innovation Review. The supplement highlights promising strategies and emerging approaches for building healthy, equitable, and sustainable communities. (SSIR, spring 2016

EDUCATION/INFRASTRUCTURE | A new report looks at the conditions of school buildings across the country, and finds that many are in dire need of maintenance to the tune of an estimated $112 billion to ensure they are safe spaces in good condition. (WaPo, 3/22)

DISTRICT/WORKFORCE | D.C. mayor calls for raising minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2020 (WaPo, 3/22)

ARTS
– A new interactive exhibit, “In it Together: Service Members, Community and Dialogue Through Art” at the Lorton Workhouse Arts Center, showcases artwork from service members and veterans. (Inside NOVA, 3/22)

–  D.C. Artists Protest Washington Post No-TYA-Review Policy (AT, 3/22)

– Have you been wondering what happened to those plastic white balls from last year’s “The Beach” exhibit at the National Building Museum? Look no further than the forthcoming Dupont Underground. (WaPo, 3/22)


Sometimes, this is what happens when you ask the Internet to name things.

– Ciara 

 

A glimpse into the region’s future

REGION
According to a new regional forecast from the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, the region’s population will continue to grow steadily and will add nearly 1.5 million residents over the next 30 years. Job growth is also expected to be significant. Officials are concerned a surge in residents to the region will continue to present challenges in providing affordable housing and quality transportation. (WaPo, 3/9)

The [District] is projected to expand from 672,000 residents last year to 987,000 in 2045, when it will be just shy of replacing Prince George’s County as the region’s third-most-populous jurisdiction, according to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG).

Fairfax and Montgomery counties will continue to rank first and second. They and other counties in the region will continue to grow. But only Charles County, which is a quarter of the District’s size, will gain population at a faster rate than the city.

Related: Last year, 2030 Group president Bob Buchanan and George Mason’s Center for Regional Analysis senior adviser and director of special projects Stephen Fuller, led the charge to undertake an extensive research project providing recommendations for ways in which the region can reposition itself to maximize potential and remain competitive in the global economy titled, The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Future Economy. WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland also shared how philanthropy in the region might respond and collaborate with other sectors to meet challenges facing our communities. (Daily 1/15)

HEALTH
– As misconceptions change about what the “face of HIV/AIDS” looks like, grassroots efforts are proving to be helpful in empowering those who are newly diagnosed. (WTOP, 3/10)

– Medicaid Rules Can Thwart Immigrants Who Need Dialysis (WAMU, 3/8)

EDUCATION/HOMELESSNESS | With recently-announced plans to replace the D.C. General shelter with smaller facilities, some are growing concerned about what the changes may mean for overcrowding in surrounding schools. (WCP, 3/8)

PHILANTHROPY/GENDER EQUITY | Mind the Gap – How Philanthropy Can Address Gender-Based Economic Disparities (PND, 3/8)

ARTSOpinion: One theatergoer shares his experience watching a popular Broadway show featuring a diverse cast, and how he felt when he look around and noticed the audience was anything but. (NPR, 3/8)

JOBS | The Abell Foundation is seeking to fill its Grants Associate position.


This quick quiz will guess your age, marital status, and income based on which mobile apps you have on your phone. My own results came pretty close! 

– Ciara

Reported HIV cases decrease for seventh year in a row

HIV/AIDS
According to a new report released by the D.C. Department of Health, the number of reported annual new HIV cases is down for the seventh consecutive year. (DCist, 2/2)

The report shows preliminary data for 2014, which includes 396 new HIV cases – a 29 percent decrease from the 553 cases reported in 2013. The highest number of HIV cases was reported in 2007 with 1,333 cases. Since then, numbers are down by 70 percent.

Executive director of the Washington AIDS Partnership, Channing Wickham, had this to say of the news:

I’m very pleased to see the hard work of the nonprofit community, the D.C. Department of Health, and the HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB Administration (HAHSTA) reflected in the latest data for new HIV cases.  At the same time, it’s imperative to remember the thousands of District residents who are living with HIV and the need to continue and expand HIV prevention efforts.

REGION/ECONOMY | A new study by the Brookings Institution ranks the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria area against 99 other metro regions in the U.S. in terms of recovery from the Great Recession. The study rates the D.C. area’s performance as: 71st in “growth;” 91st in “prosperity;” 72nd in “inclusion;” and 77th in “inclusion by race.” (DCist, 2/2)

HOUSING/DISTRICT | Some 7,300 households rely on public housing in the District. With a number of public housing properties slated for overdue rehabilitation or replacement, DC Fiscal Policy Institute shares some of the risks this could cause for families who may be displaced, and offers recommendations for their protection. (DCFPI, 1/27)

WORKFORCE/SOCIAL PROFITS | Hiring Keeps Rising at Nonprofits in N.Y and D.C., Study Says (Chronicle, 2/2)  Subscription required

YOUTH/EDUCATION
– The District and the D.C. Public Library have announced a new program, Books from Birth, that will send enrolled children a book every month until the age of five. The program is a partnership between the city and the Dollywood Foundation. (WCP, 2/2)

How Rich Parents Can Exacerbate School Inequality (Atlantic, 1/28)

ARTS/RACIAL EQUITY | Opinion: A writer shares his experiences witnessing slotting, tokenism, and dehumanization in the nonprofit theater sector. (NPQ, 1/29)

POVERTY | OpinionWhat Data Can Do To Fight Poverty (NYT, 1/29)


The Washingtonian presents a guide to successfully living in Washington, D.C.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – November 9 through November 13, 2015

THIS WEEK IN CSR/VETERANS
– Tim McClimon, president of the American Express Foundation and head faculty member for the Institute for CSR, shared how his organization supports the Veterans Empowerment Movement. (American Express, 11/9)

THIS WEEK IN FOOD/EDUCATION
– Schools in the region, particularly in Prince George’s County, are getting their hands dirty by taking the classroom experience outdoors in learning gardens. (WTOP, 11/10)

– Though research has often suggested that most low-income individuals find it difficult to maintain healthy nutritional habits because of food deserts, recent studies say poor eating habits have less to do with proximity and much more to do with income. (Atlantic, 11/9)

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS & HUMANITIES
– The Nonprofit Finance Fund released two reports – one for grantmakers and another for arts organizations – summarizing lessons learned about capitalization in the arts sector. (NFF, 10/2015)

– Nonprofit theaters are attracting more donors, but audiences keep shrinking, report says (LA Times, 11/5)

 Harvard Medical School joins an emerging trend among institutions encouraging their students to take part in arts and humanities courses in order to improve their skills in empathy and observation. (Boston Globe, 11/2)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


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Rejoice, cat owners! As it turns out, your cat is unlikely sitting at home plotting your demise – research be darned.

– Ciara

Childcare costs are high. Wages for childcare workers are not.

CHILDCARE/WORKFORCE
There have been a number of studies on just how expensive childcare is for families in the District compared with the rest of the country. While many low-income and middle-class families struggle to afford to keep their children enrolled in care, most of those providing childcare services cannot afford it themselves. (Atlantic, 11/5)

On average, these women (it’s almost entirely women) are paid significantly less than the average American worker and are twice as likely to live in poverty, a new study released by the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) found. The median hourly wage for childcare workers in the U.S. is $10.39, nearly 40 percent below the median hourly wage of workers in other occupations. Even when accounting for the demographic makeup of the childcare industry—workers are more likely to be minorities, much more likely to be women, and less likely to have a bachelor’s or advanced degree—their earnings were still 23 percent lower than in other occupations. Childcare workers also had less access to benefits, such as health insurance and retirement funds, than people employed in other fields.

ECONOMY/REGION | Five reasons to be concerned about Washington’s economy (WaPo, 11/9)

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS | A new housing development in Southeast D.C. aims to be a model in sustainability and a refuge for low-income and homeless families in need of permanent housing. (WaPo, 11/6)

YOUTH/EDUCATION
– Following data from a 2012 study showing that American teens score low on financial literacy, districts in Northern Virginia strive to keep students ahead of the curve with new requirements for economics and personal-finance courses for high schoolers. (WaPo, 11/1)

– A recent study on child development finds that children develop a sense of self esteem earlier than previously thought – even before they have begun to attend school. (WaPo, 11/6)

FOOD/POVERTY | For years, researchers have linked the inability for many low-income individuals to maintain healthy nutritional habits to food deserts, but recent studies say poor eating habits have less to do with proximity and more to do with income. (Atlantic, 11/9)

ARTS & HUMANITIES
– The Nonprofit Finance Fund has released two reports – one for grantmakers and another for arts organizations – summarizing lessons learned about capitalization in the arts sector. (NFF, 10/2015)

Nonprofit theaters are attracting more donors, but audiences keep shrinking, report says (LA Times, 11/5)


French artists from 100 years ago, we have failed you.

– Ciara

New study a ‘wake up call’ for funders of black and Latino arts groups

ARTS
The University of Maryland’s DeVos Institute of Arts Management has released a new national study on funding for African American and Latino arts groups. The report, with its controversial findings, may serve as a ‘wake up call’ to some arts funders (LA Times, 10/12):

Sending “a wake-up call” to arts donors, a new national study paints a bleak economic picture of African American and Latino nonprofit museums and performing arts companies and suggests that donors may have to let weaker organizations wither so that the strongest ones can grow.

Funders may need to support “a limited number of organizations,” says the report by the University of Maryland’s DeVos Institute of Arts Management, “with larger grants to a smaller cohort that can manage themselves effectively, make the best art, and have the biggest impact on their communities.”

– Take a glimpse at the highly anticipated expansion of the Town Hall Education Arts Recreation Center – also known as THEARC – scheduled to break ground later this month. Big plans are in place for the facility. (WBJ, 10/6)

Arlington County proposes speeding up its exit from the Artisphere (WBJ, 10/12)

PHILANTHROPY
–  CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield has announced that it will award $3 million to social profit organizations and government organizations in the region to develop new, innovative telemedicine programs that improve access to healthcare. (WBJ, 10/12)

– Grantmakers for Effective Organizations has released a new publication, The Source Codes of Foundation Culture, a resource exploring the organizational culture of foundations and what it takes to modify the values and practices deeply ingrained in their work. (GEO, 10/8)

– The Foley Hoag Foundation is now accepting applications from qualified social profit organizations located in Washington, D.C. through an invitation-only process. The foundation seeks help in identifying those organizations who may be a good fit. Guidelines focus on eliminating inequality in all forms and on small grassroots organizations. You can find more information on the guidelines  here.

EDUCATION
– A study commissioned by the Montgomery County Board of Education examines how the county’s school system has served students with specials needs and their parents. According to the report, further staff training, more psychologists, and greater efforts to educate parents on complex processes will be necessary to bring the high-performing schools to where they need to be. (WaPo, 10/9)

– In the District, a growing number of parents are opting out of traditional schooling in favor of home-schooling, with the number of registered home-schooling families up by a third over the past two years. (WaPo, 10/10)

A Discouraging Portrait of America’s Urban Public Schools (City Lab, 10/9)

SOCIAL INNOVATION | Read how financial institution Goldman Sachs saw success while dabbling in social impact bonds with an investment in 100 Utah preschoolers. (NYT, 10/7)


All aboard!

– Ciara 

44 area theater companies take on the gender gap in theatrical productions

ARTS | Only 27 percent of the plays produced in D.C. this theater season were written by women. To address this disparity, 44 theater companies from around the region have committed to producing a new play by a female playwright in the fall of 2015: (WaPo, 1/24)

The Women’s Voices Theatre Festival, encompassing virtually every large, midsize and fledgling theater company in and around the city, is being billed as a landmark event in the effort to put new plays by female playwrights onstage. Its organizers acknowledge that it won’t permanently rewrite the statistics showing that in this country, about four plays by men get produced professionally for every one by a woman. But the festival does throw down a gauntlet, in the cause of striking a more equitable gender balance — especially given that surveys show that women make up as much as two-thirds of the theatergoing audience across the nation.

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY | In a special piece on the Forbes site, the Advisory Board Company‘s Graham McLaughlin writes about why his company is placing a new emphasis on empathy among their employees:

We want to do this because it will further our mission and our margin. By creating this empathetic workforce…we think we can better understand, at a gut level as well as an intellectual level, the needs of our member hospitals and higher education organizations, as well as those of our communities.

By combining our unique skills and expertise with an empathetic approach to our member and community interactions, we can better anticipate their needs and the needs of those they serve, work with our members as a true partner, and ultimately create transformational, positive change in healthcare, education, and our communities.

HEALTH/WORKFORCE | Check out the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region‘s blog for a video about a new health clinic in Ward 8. The clinic also features a workforce development program, funded by the foundation’s Greater Washington Workforce Development Collaborative, that trains neighborhood residents for positions at the clinic. (CFNCR, 1/24)

EDUCATION | DC schools chancellor Kaya Henderson has announced the creation of a task force on standardized tests to, in her words, “help put testing in the proper perspective.” (WaPo, 1.24)

HOMELESSNESS | Homeless shelters bogged down as cold snap continues (WTOP, 1/23)

LOCAL | ‘Green’ modifications proposed to D.C. clean-water plan; environmentalists are skeptical (WaPo, 1/24)


This time lapse video of a woman teaching herself how to dance has been around for a while but I missed it until now. It’s awesome.

-Rebekah