Tag: Tamara Copeland

Homelessness rises unevenly across the region

HOMELESSNESS/REGION
The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments recently shared the results of the Annual Point-in-Time Count of Persons Experiencing Homelessness. Overall in the region, the homeless population rose by five percent from 2015 to 2016, though not spread evenly across the area. The report urges more aggressive action to bring affordable housing to families in Greater Washington. (WAMU, 5/11)

According to the Annual Point-in-Time Count of Persons Experiencing Homelessness […] there were 12,215 people who were homeless across the nine local jurisdictions that participate in the yearly census, which took place on Jan. 28.

That’s up from the 11,623 homeless people in the region at the same time last year.

[…]

In D.C., the number of homeless people increased by 14 percent, while it went up by 12 percent in Frederick County. Things went in the opposite direction for the rest of the region, though. In Arlington County, Loudoun County and the City of Alexandria, the number of homeless people decreased by 27, 20 and 16 percent, respectively.

The full report can be accessed here.

– The number of homeless families in D.C. has risen by more than 30 percent in comparison with a year ago. Further, the District’s homeless children and their parents outnumbered homeless single adults for the first time since the annual census began in 2001. (WaPo, 5/11)

RACISM/COMMUNITY
–  In a letter to the editor of the Chronicle of Philanthropy, WRAG president Tamara Copeland calls on organizations to talk about racism, and reflects on how the topic of diversity is sometimes used to deflect deeper conversations about race and racism in society. (Chronicle, 5/12).

– In his most recent blog post adapted from a panel presentation at last week’s GEO conference, Rick Moyers, vice president for programs and communications at the Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation, summarizes Meyer’s experience with the 28 organizations they’ve supported in implementing the Benevon Model for increasing individual giving. His take away? “I wish we’d known at the outset that the goal was to change organizational culture.” (Meyer, 5/11)

Related: Rick is the first speaker in WRAG’s Nonprofit Summer Learning Series. Catch him on June 23 addressing The Dos & Don’ts of Working with Grantmakers!

ECONOMY/REGION | Region’s innovation economy needs boost or risks being ‘laggards’ (WBJ, 5/12)

MARYLAND | Study: Gaithersburg Is The Most Diverse City In America (DCist, 5/11)

HEALTH | A new study finds a 44 percent increase in hospitalizations for ischemic (the most common type) strokes among people ages 25 to 44, despite a 20 percent overall drop among all Americans. (WaPo, 5/11)


Conference calls, you’re the worst! Well…maybe not the worst, but honestly, does anyone actually enjoy them?

– Ciara

Friday roundup – April 18 through April 22, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG
 In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland discussed the progression of the Putting Racism on the Table series and how it’s about more than just learning. (Daily,4/21)

– Jessica Finkel, Philanthropy Fellow at Kaiser Permanente, shared how her experience working with the organization’s Community Benefit department helped her discover a passion for policy and public health. (Daily, 3/20)

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
Consumer Health Foundation president and WRAG board member Yanique Redwood discussed how marijuana-related incarcerations have devastated communities of color for years, citing points from WRAG’s recent Putting Racism on the Table session on mass incarceration, featuring speaker James Bell, J.D. of the W. Haywood Burns Institute. (CHF, 4/20)

Inter-American Development Bank launched a newly-revamped Improving Lives grants program, open to nonprofit organizations serving low-income Latin American and Caribbean communities in the Washington metropolitan area. The program will combine five grants of up to $50,000 each with skills-based volunteering, and is aimed at promoting innovative projects involving community and economic development, health and well-being, education or the arts. Eligible organizations in the region may apply for grants by submitting proposals before 6 pm (EST) May 19, 2016. For more information, please read the requirements or write to idbcommunityrelations@iadb.org.

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION/ECONOMY
– Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker spoke on his vision for making the jurisdiction a high-demand area for business in his recent State of the Economy address. (WBJ, 4/13)

– While Arlington County’s population continues to grow, the number of jobs continues to decline, according to recent data. (ARLnow, 4/20)

THIS WEEK IN THE WORKFORCE
Here are three key tools organizations in the social sector can use to build more diverse workplaces and address persistent institutional biases. (SSIR, 4/14)

 Lack of Training for Young Nonprofit Workers Means Too Few Potential Leaders (Chronicle, 4/19) Subscription required


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


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Can you remember these viral dance moves from the past ten years?

– Ciara

Committing to change

WRAG/PHILANTHROPY
In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland discusses the progression of the Putting Racism on the Table series. It’s more than just learning. (Daily, 4/21)

I am proud of the commitment that philanthropy has made to this learning journey. People who felt that they were sensitive to and understood racism have learned that it is far more nuanced, unconscious, and institutionalized than many would think. We have achieved the goal of knowledge gain. But, this isn’t learning just for the sake of learning.

Philanthropy has been referred to as society’s passing gear. Its position provides a platform for societal change that goes well beyond dollars.

COMMUNITY | The JP Morgan Chase Institute recently released a study tracking and evaluating the spending and saving patterns of millions of their banking customers in 15 metro areas in order to show important trends in how spending has changed due to temporary and more permanent income changes. The data offer important insights to companies, governments, and social profit organizations on the actual economic status of a community. (USCCF, 4/8)

VIRGINIA/ECONOMY | According to new county data, while Arlington’s population continues to grow, the number of jobs continues to decline. (ARLnow, 4/20)

MASS INCARCERATION/SOCIAL JUSTICE | OpinionWhy Mass Incarceration Doesn’t Pay (NYT, 4/21)

SOCIAL PROFITS | Compass, a provider of pro bono consulting services to social profit organizations that benefit the Greater Washington community, has opened their 2016-2017 client application. Each client will receive approximately $150,000 of strategic consulting services free of charge. This year, Compass expects to select 20-25 nonprofits. Click here to learn more.


A brief history of the “romantic” things that people have done in movies that you absolutely, positively should not do in real life.

– Ciara

Is the power of philanthropy enough to move the needle on racism? Yes, it already is.

by Tamara Lucas Copeland
President
Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

In January, the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers (WRAG) started an intensive exploration of racism called Putting Racism on the Table. Each month, for three hours, grantmakers have been immersed in a topic. Structural racism in January, white privilege in February, implicit bias in March, and this month the focus was on mass incarceration as a case study on how all three factors are operationalized in one system of government, the criminal justice system.

I think that several factors are remarkable about this work. First, eleven major funders in the Greater Washington region came together and said, “We aren’t ready to act. We want to learn.” This was powerful. It has seemed like a societal taboo to talk about the 800-pound gorilla of racism that sits in the middle of the room when discussing housing needs, educational needs, health care, or any of the multitude of community needs that philanthropy seeks to address. But these grantmakers were ready for the talk. Eighty percent of the attendees have come to two or more of the sessions. They have recognized that racism cannot be explored in sound bites. There is a depth and breadth to the topic that requires that you listen, reflect, talk with others, and then sit with the information for a while to make it your own. They are doing the hard work of truly understanding racism. After the sessions, many have been candid in revealing, despite their education and commitment to social justice, just how lacking their knowledge truly was about how pervasive and entrenched racism is in our society. Here’s an illustrative sampling of comments:

“After the session on structural racism, I realized how little I know about racism.”

“The systemic nature of racism is more pervasive than I had previously understood.”

“I think there are situations where white privilege is so ingrained that I am not even aware of the impact I am having just by being present or in casual conversation.”

“Having been through the session on implicit bias, I better understand the very strong and powerful way our subconscious influences our thinking and actions. What can we do?”

I am proud of the commitment that philanthropy has made to this learning journey. People who felt that they were sensitive to and understood racism have learned that it is far more nuanced, unconscious, and institutionalized than many would think. We have achieved the goal of knowledge gain. But, this isn’t learning just for the sake of learning.

Philanthropy has been referred to as society’s passing gear. Its position provides a platform for societal change that goes well beyond dollars. Consider the impact of the national Robert Wood Johnson Foundation on smoking reduction or that of the local Summit Fund on teenage pregnancy prevention. They both felt that they could make a difference and with a laser focus that commitment has led to deep and lasting improvements.

I have heard foundation CEOs talk about how this work is already translating into changes at their foundations. I have heard trustees who are business leaders share the impact that it is having on their thinking and on their actions. And, I have heard colleagues in other states discuss how WRAG’s work has opened the door for a discussion that they didn’t think they could have with funders. The needle is moving – slowly perhaps – but moving, and the momentum is building. Stay tuned.

New video is live – Putting Racism on the Table: White Privilege

PUTTING RACISM ON THE TABLE/WRAG
The second video in the “Putting Racism on the Table” series is now live! The video features Dr. Robin DiAngelo, former professor of education and author of What Does It Mean to be White?, speaking on white privilege. After you’ve had a chance to view the video, we encourage you to share your thoughts on the series or on the specific topic via Twitter using the hashtag #PuttingRacismOnTheTable, or by commenting on WRAG’s Facebook page. We also suggest checking out the viewing guide and discussion guide to be used with the video. Both can be found on our website.

WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland said of the video release:

I am so pleased to share the next installment of the Putting Racism on the Table video series. Dr. Robin DiAngelo provided a thought-provoking and memorable session on a topic that is an integral piece of the puzzle surrounding the various aspects of race and racism. In this video, Dr. DiAngelo takes viewers on an exploration of white privilege and how it works to perpetuate an inequitable society.

HOUSING/ARTS | You can take a glimpse inside The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation‘s Art Place at Fort Totten, a new development coming in mid-2017 to include more than 900 apartments, a new children’s museum, and retail. (WBJ, 4/11)

EDUCATION/NATIONAL | New data show that, in 23 states, the annual cost of educating a 4-year old at a full-time day care center exceeds the average cost of in-state tuition at a four-year institution. Maryland is one of those states. (WSJ, 4/11)

SOCIAL EQUITY
– A new study suggests that when an individual has just a brief, in-person empathetic encounter with another individual who identifies with a group they hold prejudice against, their views can be  dramatically changed. (City Lab, 4/8)

AudioBlind Hiring, While Well Meaning, May Create Unintended Consequences (NPR, 4/12)

PHILANTHROPY | OpinionPhilanthropic Leadership Shouldn’t Still Look Like the Country-Club Set (Chronicle, 4/11) Subscription required.

DISTRICT| Editorial: The Washington Post takes a look at recent violent crime occurring in the District’s wards 7 and 8 over the past several days, and why it remains so important to tackle social issues that are often factors in crime. (WaPo, 4/11)


Go, Twiggy, go!

– Ciara

Another year of decline in domestic migration

REGION/ECONOMY
A new report from George Mason University’s Center for Regional Analysis looks at the migration trends of the region’s population. According to the report, the region experienced its second straight year of decline in domestic migration. (WBJ, 3/28)

Domestic migration was responsible for a loss of 25,200 people from 2013 to 2014, according to the report. The last time the region had positive domestic migration was from 2013 to 2014, when 25,200 moved here.

[…]

People are leaving the region for a combination of factors that also includes overall affordability — child care and housing are the biggest — and the growth and opportunities in other areas of the country. Some U.S. regions had sluggish economies themselves right after the Great Recession but have recently seen stronger growth.

Center director Terry Clower also cites research from The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Future Economy for its recommendations on ways the economy can improve.

Related: Last year, the 2030 Group’s Bob Buchanan and the Center for Regional Analysis’s Stephen Fuller undertook an extensive research project called, The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Future Economy, to recommend ways the region can reposition itself to remain competitive in the global economy. WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland also shared how philanthropy in the region might respond and collaborate with other sectors to meet challenges facing our communities. (Daily 1/15)

– Both D.C. and Montgomery County are eyeing a minimum wage increase to $15. (WAMU, 3/25)

HOUSING
– In their latest blog post, the D.C. Office of Revenue Analysis explores how rents in the city are so high despite many residences being subject to rent control. (District, Measured, 3/23)

NPR takes a glimpse into the courtrooms of D.C.’s Landlord and Tenant Branch where mostly low-income renters and their landlords squabble over issues of rent payments and substandard living conditions. (NPR, 3/28)

ARTS
– In Reston, officials are revisiting the allocation of funds for public art. (Reston Now, 3/25)

– D.C.’s Fillmore Arts Center will be saved for another year (WaPo, 3/25)

PHILANTHROPY
A recent survey looks at the philanthropic activity predictions of 400 leading private bankers and wealth advisors who manage around $500 billion in assets for ultra-high net worth individuals. (NPQ, 3/24)

– Have a look at Fortune‘s 2016 list of the World’s Greatest Leaders in philanthropy, arts, business, government and more. (Fortune, 3/2016)

CSR/SOCIAL PROFITS | Audio: How Nonprofits and Corporations Can Join Forces (Chronicle, 3/25)

EDUCATIONHow to Graduate More Black Students (Atlantic, 3/23)


Do you live in a paper napkin, cloth napkin, or paper towel household?

– Ciara

Friday roundup – March 14 through March 18, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG/THE WRAG COMMUNITY
 – WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland posed the question, “When was the last time you talked about racism?,” and explained her view on why you should start. (Daily, 3/15)

– Catherine Oidtman, Philanthropy Fellow at the Healthcare Initiative Foundation, shared what she’s learned about going “beyond dollars” in philanthropy. (Daily, 3/14)

Related for WRAG Members: We are now accepting applications from WRAG members interested in hosting Philanthropy Fellows this fall. For more information about this program and how to apply, click here.

Opinion: Lynn Tadlock, Deputy Executive Director of Giving at the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation and WRAG board chair, shared her views on why urgent reform is necessary to put an end to gerrymandering in Virginia. (Loudoun Times, 3/3)

THIS WEEK IN TRANSIT/INFRASTRUCTURE
 Why Washington’s transportation is a problem, in one map (GGW, 3/15)

– Opinion: We caused the Metro shutdown when we decided to let our cities decay (WaPo, 3/16)

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH/EQUITY
– WAMU released their new, four-part series on the continuing struggle for inclusion facing individuals with developmental disabilities in the District. (WAMU,  3/2016)

– The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released their 2016 County Health RankingsIn Virginia, Loudoun County was number one in the overall ranking for health outcomes, and in Maryland, Montgomery County came out on top. (WTOP, 3/16)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Who do you think is the most photographed man of the 19th century?

– Ciara

A look at employment in the social profit sector through the Great Recession

WORKFORCE
New data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveal that during the Great Recession, as other industries cut back significantly on hiring and increased layoffs, the social profit sector continued to add jobs – a trend that is likely to reverse, for better or for worse. (WaPo, 3/2)

At the same time, organizations dipped into rainy day funds to stay afloat, resulting in a decline in asset levels. Some workers may have accepted lower wages for non-profit work because of the poor job market, boosting employment as well.

All of that is also why, when the bureau next puts out employment numbers, the figures might show a decrease: Resources are depleted, and the need also isn’t as great.

– A new JPMorgan Chase report, “Tech Jobs for All? Exploring the Promise and Pitfalls of Technology Training in the United States,” takes a look at the rapidly growing and quickly evolving tech training field and the unique obstacles it faces in developing the skilled and diverse workforce required to meet a growing need within the economy. The report is part of  JPMorgan Chase’s $250 million, five-year New Skills at Work initiative to address the mismatch between employer needs and the skills of job seekers..

Opinion: Jobs for the Young in Poor Neighborhoods (NYT, 3/14)

WRAG/RACISM | In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland poses the question, “When was the last time you talked about racism?,” and explains her view on why you should start. (Daily, 3/15)

COMMUNITY/VIRGINIA | Opinion: Lynn Tadlock, Deputy Executive Director of Giving of the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation and WRAG board chair, shares her views on why urgent reform is necessary to put an end to gerrymandering in the state of Virginia. (Loudoun Times, 3/3)

HIV/AIDS | Eight American cities joined the Fast Track Cities Initiative, established on World AIDS Day in 2014 “to ensure that 90% of people living with HIV know that they have the virus, are taking anti-retroviral treatment medications and in so doing, are keeping the virus suppressed.” Take a look at what those cities, including the District, have been doing to successfully lower their HIV/AIDS rates and increase awareness. Kudos to the Washington AIDS Partnership for being recognized for their work! (Mic, 3/10)

POVERTY | Federal assistance for families in poverty can cover expenses like food, health care, and housing, but with data showing that families in the lowest-income quintile spend around 14 percent of their after-tax income on diapers, advocates are seeking ways to further support those in need with household necessities. (WaPo, 3/14)

HEALTH/EQUITY | WAMU unveils a new, four-part series on the continuing struggle for inclusion that those with developmental disabilities in the District face. (WAMU,  3/ 2016)

ARTS/PHILANTHROPY | Americans Support Increases for Government Arts Funding (ArtsBlog, 3/5)


Perhaps the only thing more significant than turning 100-years-old is being able to do it with three of your lifelong friends.

– Ciara

When was the last time you talked about racism?

by Tamara Lucas Copeland
President
Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

Yes, WRAG is leading a learning journey called Putting Racism on the Table, but this post is not about that. This post is about why you – whoever you are – should be putting racism on whatever table, literal or metaphoric, at which you sit.

Think about it. If you are a white reader of this post, when was the last time that you talked about, or witnessed, racism? I don’t mean inclusion or equity or diversity, but racism? If you are African American, I suspect your answer to that question most likely is “today” or “yesterday.” It is not an exaggeration for me to say, African Americans live and breathe racism daily. I don’t mean overt acts of personal animus. Racism today is often in the form of structures and institutions that disadvantage or advantage one race relative to another. Sometimes it occurs in incidents of bias that may be unintentional, but are driven by societal and cultural stimuli that affect us all.

Consider these realities for Black America:

Those are big, complex issues. But what makes racism so insidious are the small occurrences that even those who are committed to racial justice rarely notice.

Consider these:

  • Last week, I was looking for an image of an African American baby to accompany a Twitter post. I went to a free image website and found that there was not one image of an African American baby – not one. I suspect a white person may not have noticed that. I did.
  • A friend was selling her house and was advised to remove all family photos from the walls. Potential buyers, she was told, shouldn’t know that the house was owned by a black family. Did this person harbor personal animus toward people of color? Maybe, but I doubt it. Perhaps they thought they were commenting honestly about the possible prejudice of potential home-buyers.
  • Similarly, I was renting out a house that I own and was advised to remove an image on the website that showed a person of color relaxing beside the house. Why? I would potentially limit the renters if they thought it was a black neighborhood. Does it change your thinking when I tell you that the person who said this was a person of color?

Today, I ask you to put racism on YOUR table. Maybe media coverage of recent events will prompt your thinking. Maybe a comment made by a family member or neighbor will cause the topic to come to mind. I know that you can’t walk in my shoes, or me in yours, but I hope you will commit to spending time every week educating yourself about racial issues facing our country, learning about the genesis of those issues, and thinking about what you can do to change the situation. You can start your learning by watching our video series or simply talking honestly with a friend, neighbor or colleague. Please join me in #PuttingRacismOnTheTable. You can make a difference.

A glimpse into the region’s future

REGION
According to a new regional forecast from the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, the region’s population will continue to grow steadily and will add nearly 1.5 million residents over the next 30 years. Job growth is also expected to be significant. Officials are concerned a surge in residents to the region will continue to present challenges in providing affordable housing and quality transportation. (WaPo, 3/9)

The [District] is projected to expand from 672,000 residents last year to 987,000 in 2045, when it will be just shy of replacing Prince George’s County as the region’s third-most-populous jurisdiction, according to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG).

Fairfax and Montgomery counties will continue to rank first and second. They and other counties in the region will continue to grow. But only Charles County, which is a quarter of the District’s size, will gain population at a faster rate than the city.

Related: Last year, 2030 Group president Bob Buchanan and George Mason’s Center for Regional Analysis senior adviser and director of special projects Stephen Fuller, led the charge to undertake an extensive research project providing recommendations for ways in which the region can reposition itself to maximize potential and remain competitive in the global economy titled, The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Future Economy. WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland also shared how philanthropy in the region might respond and collaborate with other sectors to meet challenges facing our communities. (Daily 1/15)

HEALTH
– As misconceptions change about what the “face of HIV/AIDS” looks like, grassroots efforts are proving to be helpful in empowering those who are newly diagnosed. (WTOP, 3/10)

– Medicaid Rules Can Thwart Immigrants Who Need Dialysis (WAMU, 3/8)

EDUCATION/HOMELESSNESS | With recently-announced plans to replace the D.C. General shelter with smaller facilities, some are growing concerned about what the changes may mean for overcrowding in surrounding schools. (WCP, 3/8)

PHILANTHROPY/GENDER EQUITY | Mind the Gap – How Philanthropy Can Address Gender-Based Economic Disparities (PND, 3/8)

ARTSOpinion: One theatergoer shares his experience watching a popular Broadway show featuring a diverse cast, and how he felt when he look around and noticed the audience was anything but. (NPR, 3/8)

JOBS | The Abell Foundation is seeking to fill its Grants Associate position.


This quick quiz will guess your age, marital status, and income based on which mobile apps you have on your phone. My own results came pretty close! 

– Ciara