Tag: social profit

Ending segregation in the District’s schools could begin with pre-K

EDUCATION
– The District of Columbia’s school system has remained stubbornly segregated for decades, with Blacks, Latinx and Whites largely attending schools with peers of their own race. With the city’s recent boom of children, administrators wonder if pre-K students can help turn the tide. (WaPo, 6/2)

Washington has one of the nation’s highest-quality preschool programs, experts say. It’s also one of the most segregated. In the 2013-14 school year, 86 percent of the city’s black pre-K students attended what experts call “racially isolated” schools where fewer than 10 percent of students are white.

Already, gentrification is bringing signs of change: White 3- and 4-year-olds represent 15 percent of pre-K students in D.C. in the current school year, up from 11 percent in 2013-14. The black and Hispanic shares dropped slightly over the same period.

– Washington area school systems are increasingly embracing multilingual learning. (WaPo, 6/5)

SOCIAL PROFITS | Tamara Copeland, WRAG’s president, ponders the lack of sabbaticals in the social profit sector and discusses the benefits of taking an extended break. Tamara will take her own sabbatical this summer. (Daily, 6/5)

ENVIRONMENTFoundations and Donors Vow to Step Up on Climate Change as U.S. Steps Back (Chronicle, 6/2 – Subscription needed)

HEALTH CARE
– Maryland citizens advocate for Medicaid as Congress decides how to rework the program. (Baltimore Sun, 6/3)

– La Clínica del Pueblo Opens First LGBTQ Health Center Focused on Latinx In Maryland (WCP, 6/2)

CHILDREN/YOUTH | Teen sex trafficking is a major issue in Northern Virginia. These individuals are trying to help victims. (WTOP, 6/4)


DC’s Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton has a park dedicated to her.

– Kendra

Will Sabbaticals Be Commonplace in the Social Profit Sector One Day?

By Tamara Copeland
President
Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

“These people are sacrificing so much to take on the executive roles of these groups. We are watching people not just burn out but make themselves sick in service of their communities. It’s our job to take care of them.” – Julie Rogers

So said then-Meyer Foundation CEO Julie Rogers in 2014, in an interview with the Stanford Social Innovation Review. She was quoted in an article entitled “Combatting Burnout in Nonprofit Leaders” that appeared just months before the Meyer Foundation established a sabbatical program in Julie’s name. Until Meyer launched this program, the concept of sabbaticals in the nonprofit sector wasn’t really on my radar. Of course, there were exceptions. George Jones and Chuck Bean were the only local nonprofit leaders I knew who had taken sabbaticals. I recently spoke with them about the value of their sabbaticals:

George Jones, CEO, Bread for the City:
“After 15 years as the CEO, not only was the sabbatical one of the most exciting, reinvigorating 90 days of my life, but 5 years later I still find myself fondly reflecting on one part or another of that experience. And I feel like the opportunity really did re-energize my mind, body and soul for my return to the challenging social justice work we do at Bread for the City.”

Chuck Bean, former CEO of the Nonprofit Roundtable (now CEO of the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments):
“I had a two-month sabbatical in my eighth year at the Nonprofit Roundtable. A CEO is, every day, at the juncture of mission and money. She/he is the filter for real-time strategic planning. If they’re not fresh, if they’re lost in the weeds, they’re gonna miss something big that’s gonna hold back the organization. My sabbatical gave me the opportunity to focus with intentionality on my health, to clear out the cobwebs. The result, I think, is that it helped me think more strategically.”

Other than George and Chuck, and the recent recipients of the Julie Rogers award,* I haven’t heard much about sabbaticals for nonprofit leaders in the DMV. It’s time to change that.

I encourage my colleagues in the social profit sector to consider your own state of mind, your own well-being. What do the airlines tell us? “Put on your oxygen mask before helping others.” We all need to recharge, to have our energy renewed for the next challenge.

Is it time for you to consider a sabbatical request? If so, determine when your organization can best accommodate your absence. (There is a month or two, really. You can find it.) Think about how you will use the time. Create a plan for coverage at your organization, write your proposal, and talk with your board leadership.

For those who serve on nonprofit boards: I urge you to consider policies that make executive directors and senior staff (or all staff) eligible for sabbaticals after a certain period of service. Research exists on the value that can accrue to an organization by giving executives an extended break from the daily grind.

At a time when the work we do in the social sector is more critical than ever, taking time to rest, reflect, and recharge might just be one of the best things we can do to be more effective.


Note: The WRAG Board of Trustees approved my sabbatical request for this summer. Back after Labor Day ready to face the challenges and opportunities at WRAG and in the region.

*Recipients include Michael Cassidy, the Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis; Michele Booth Cole, Safe Shores; Oramenta Newsome, LISC; and Kristine Thompson, Calvary Women’s Services.

Some question expansion as summer youth jobs program begins

WORKFORCE/REGION
D.C.’s summer youth jobs program kicks off with 12,000 participants, including those who were made eligible due to the city raising the age limit from 21 to 24 in 2015. Meanwhile, officials grapple over data proving whether or not the age increase has proven to be a financially feasible move. (WaPo, 6/26)

If the program can’t prove that it helps its oldest participants find jobs that last beyond the summer, it stands to lose the millions of dollars needed to maintain the expansion that began last summer.

[…]

Unemployment rates for D.C. residents between age 20 and 24 are almost double the average rate in the city and even higher for young black people. About 1,000 men and women between the ages of 22 and 24 were accepted to the 2016 program, the maximum number allowed.

But the additional funding came with stipulations. The council agreed to permanently expand funding for the new age division only if the program could show that at least 35 percent of the 22-to-24-year-olds had full-time jobs after they completed the six-week program.

– Metro General Manager Paul J. Wiedefeld to eliminate 500 jobs (WaPo, 6/27)

HIV/AIDS | An interactive map providing a visualization of new HIV cases across the District has been released along with a new report by AIDSVu. The data used come from the city and the CDC, and show that D.C.’s ward 7 was hit the hardest with new HIV cases. (DCist, 6/23)

Related: Washington AIDS Partnership is at the forefront of efforts to “end HIV” in the city with a new program connecting black heterosexual women (the second-highest group of new HIV infections) to pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, and the soon-to-be released “90/90/90/50 by 2020” plan. (Daily, 6/20)

POVERTY/DISTRICT | WAMU presents a series exploring poverty this week, focusing today on the Greater Washington region and the underlying challenges its many social profit organizations face in aiding the poor. Residents and local leaders chime in on this interview, including president and CEO of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region Bruce McNamer, to discuss obstacles to combating poverty. (WAMU, 6/27)

EDUCATION | The D.C. government recently appealed a May ruling by the federal court that said the city is “providing inadequate services to young children with special needs who have yet to enter the school system.” (WaPo, 6/24)

COMMUNITY/REGION | Not far from the Greater Washington region, nearly 44 of West Virginia’s 55 counties have recently been hit hard by massive flooding. WRAG colleague organization Philanthropy West Virginia shares flood recovery response resources for those wishing to provide assistance.

LGBT | Gay Marriage in the United States, One Year Later (Atlantic, 6/26)

EQUITY | Many organizations and institutions are focusing their efforts around equity, but are they approaching equity…equitably? This blog post explores “meta-equity” and offers some suggestions for getting it right. (NWB, 6/27)


How much do you think it would cost to Uber across the country? This Fairfax filmmaker is about to find out

– Ciara

Do More 24 in full swing!

COMMUNITY/REGION 
Today marks the United Way of the National Capital Area‘s annual Do More 24 event – a 24-hour online giving campaign that kicked off at midnight and will end at 11:59 pm. Local, regional, and national social profit organizations with a presence in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area are participating in the focused day of giving to create maximum impact as a community. The award winners will be announced tomorrow. Click here to remain up-to-date on the total raised – and to give!

CSR
– The Chronicle of Philanthropy presents a special report and interactive database on giving from America’s biggest companies. Bank of America, Citi, Capital OneJPMorgan Chase, PNC, and Wells Fargo are among the companies highlighted for their corporate giving and social good efforts. (Chronicle, 6/1) Subscription required

– Socially Responsible Companies Are Big Draw for Workers, Study Says (Chronicle, 6/1) Subscription required

PHILANTHROPY
Exponent Philanthropy has launched a new blog series in honor of their 20th anniversary that will focus on reflections of founders, early board members, and others with extensive careers in the field of philanthropy. In this blog post, Exponent Philanthropy founding member, former board chair, and executive director of The Americana Foundation Marty Fluharty discusses why it is so imperative for foundations to break down silos. (PhilanthroFiles, 6/2)

– Demanding That Nonprofits Not Pay For Overhead Is Preventing Them From Doing Good (Co.Exist, 6/1)

DISTRICT
– The D.C. Department of Housing and Community Development has announced the launch of a new initiative, the “June Housing Bloom,” aimed at increasing the number of affordable housing units in the city (WCP, 6/1):

The Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) is […] putting out solicitations for the development of 25 District-owned properties in Wards 4, 5, 7, and 8 to get the month-long initiative started. The offerings are part of a five-pronged strategy to reduce neighborhood blight, according to DHCD: producing affordable housing, preserving affordable housing, boosting homeownership, ending homelessness, and making use of currently vacant properties. DHCD will hold an informational meeting about the sites at its HQ on June 22, with a proposal deadline of Sept. 1.

– In Search of TANF Reform (CHF, 5/27)

VIRGINIA | VideoWhy Virginia’s Restoration of Voting Rights Matters (Atlantic, 5/31)

MENTAL HEALTH/IMPLICIT BIAS | For many people of color struggling with their mental health and seeking the aid of psychotherapy, roadblocks to access can often prevent them from getting much-needed help. A new study suggests that implicit bias on the part of psychologists’ offices may be the main barrier to some people receiving proper mental healthcare. (Atlantic, 6/1)


Do you have any strange reading habits? You are not alone in the Greater Washington region.

– Ciara

New partnership offers low-cost, high-impact learning opportunities for local nonprofit community

by Laura Dempsey, Lead Associate of Community Partnerships, Booz Allen Hamilton and Katy Moore, Managing Director of Corporate Strategy, Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers and Booz Allen Hamilton are excited to announce a new partnership designed to leverage local philanthropic expertise to help build the capacity of the Greater Washington region’s nonprofit community: the Nonprofit Summer Learning Series.

Since 2007 Booz Allen has sponsored high-quality learning opportunities for nonprofit organizations to gain critical insights from leading nonprofit development officers, foundations, and corporate grantmakers. The Nonprofit Speaker Series was created to help nonprofit executive directors, development directors, staff, and board members build their capacity and learn best practices. On average, over 350 nonprofits per year have participated in the series.

Last year, WRAG launched its highly anticipated “Fundamentals of CSR” workshop, designed to help local nonprofits ‘crack the code’ to better understand local corporate funders. Since then, WRAG has seen an increase in demand from local nonprofits looking to connect with the area’s top experts in grantmaking.

From these two successful programs, the new Nonprofit Summer Learning Series was born. Designed and taught by some of the Greater Washington region’s most respected grantmaking professionals, this low-cost learning series “pulls the curtain back on philanthropy.” WRAG and Booz Allen invite Daily WRAG readers to join us as we shed light on how grantmakers think, how they approach their work, what they look for in strong nonprofit partners, and how you can build new and stronger relationships with the local funding community. Click the links below for details on speakers, locations, fees, and registration.

June 10 | The Dos & Don’ts of Working with Grantmakers
Even if your organization has successfully received grant funding for years, do you truly understand the ins-and-outs of working with grantmakers? Do you know and understand recent trends and shifts in philanthropy? Do you know how funders like to be approached? How they make decisions? How they’re organized and staffed? Do you know how to cultivate not only relationships but true partnerships with your funders? Join us to hear from four leading grantmaking professionals in our region as they offer practical advice and insights on these topics and more.

July 14 | Navigating the Grants Process: From initial contact to long-term partnership
You’ve identified a potential funder, made contact, applied for and received a grant, sent the acknowledgement letter… But that’s just the beginning! Join us to hear from four of our region’s top grantmaking professionals as they offer practical advice and insights on navigating the grants process from getting your foot in the door all the way to long-term partnership.

August 19 | Having Tough Conversations with Your Funder
Have you ever needed to have a difficult conversation with a funder? Topics might include financial sustainability or fundraising challenges, leadership transitions or staff turnover, or not being able to achieve key objectives set forth in your grant agreement. A nonprofit leader’s ability to successfully navigate these challenging discussions can be key to building trust and deepening relationships with your funders. Join us to hear from three pairs of funder/nonprofit partners as they discuss some difficult conversations they’ve had over the years and how they came through the other side.

Continued population growth in Montgomery County

MARYLAND
Though the rate of growth remains low, Montgomery County saw the largest population increase in Maryland last year, according to figures from the U.S. Census Bureau. (Bethesda, 5/19)

The county’s estimated population as of July 1, 2015, was 1,040,116, meaning a population boost of 9,640 since 2014.

PUTTING RACISM ON THE TABLE/RACIAL EQUITY
– In this thoughtful blog post available in both English and SpanishConsumer Health Foundation board member Silvia Salazar reflects on the Putting Racism on the Table series and shares how the sessions have had a meaningful impact on her life by providing her with new ideas for viewing the world around her. (Daily, 5/19)

COMMUNITY | On Tuesday, May 24 at 9:30 a.m., The Lois & Richard England Family Foundation will host an opportunity to learn more about the 11th Street Bridge Park. Individuals interested in attending should RSVP to Irfana Noorani (irfana@bridgepark.org) to be added to the guest list.

HEALTH
– Through a partnership with the D.C. Department of Health, the public health group HIPS has begun distributing naloxone to in an effort to fight opioid drug overdoses in the District. (WCP, 5/18)

– For the third year in a row, the Washington region was named as the fittest metro area in the U.S. (WBJ, 5/18)

– America’s Health Segregation Problem (Atlantic, 5/18)

PHILANTHROPY
– A growing number of grantmakers are moving beyond the “overhead myth” to provide general operating grants and funding for administrative expenses for social profit organizations. WRAG’s colleague organization in Illinois, Forefront, shares some of their efforts to contribute to the shift in practices within their community. (Chronicle, 5/18) – Subscription Required

Opinion: Billionaire Manoj Bhargava shares his personal approach to philanthropy and why he thinks other philanthropists should consider an “attitude shift.” (Chronicle, 5/2)

– Program-Related Investments: Will New Regulations Result in Greater and Better Use? (NPQ, 5/12)

WORKFORCE
– Based on the new Department of Labor regulations expanding overtime benefits to full-time, salaried employees who make up to $47,476 a year, an estimated 4.2 million workers will be impacted – many of whom work at social profit organizations. (Chronicle, 5/18) – Subscription Required

– As more and more of the baby boomer generation retires out of the workforce, the generation’s business owners are being encouraged to transfer their company’s ownership to workers in order to improve communities and promote wealth distribution. (Co.Exist, 5/18)

TRANSITMetro Releases Finalized Long-Term Maintenance Plan. See How Your Commute Will Be Affected. (WCP, 5/19


Will you be biking to work tomorrow?

– Ciara

Committing to change

WRAG/PHILANTHROPY
In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland discusses the progression of the Putting Racism on the Table series. It’s more than just learning. (Daily, 4/21)

I am proud of the commitment that philanthropy has made to this learning journey. People who felt that they were sensitive to and understood racism have learned that it is far more nuanced, unconscious, and institutionalized than many would think. We have achieved the goal of knowledge gain. But, this isn’t learning just for the sake of learning.

Philanthropy has been referred to as society’s passing gear. Its position provides a platform for societal change that goes well beyond dollars.

COMMUNITY | The JP Morgan Chase Institute recently released a study tracking and evaluating the spending and saving patterns of millions of their banking customers in 15 metro areas in order to show important trends in how spending has changed due to temporary and more permanent income changes. The data offer important insights to companies, governments, and social profit organizations on the actual economic status of a community. (USCCF, 4/8)

VIRGINIA/ECONOMY | According to new county data, while Arlington’s population continues to grow, the number of jobs continues to decline. (ARLnow, 4/20)

MASS INCARCERATION/SOCIAL JUSTICE | OpinionWhy Mass Incarceration Doesn’t Pay (NYT, 4/21)

SOCIAL PROFITS | Compass, a provider of pro bono consulting services to social profit organizations that benefit the Greater Washington community, has opened their 2016-2017 client application. Each client will receive approximately $150,000 of strategic consulting services free of charge. This year, Compass expects to select 20-25 nonprofits. Click here to learn more.


A brief history of the “romantic” things that people have done in movies that you absolutely, positively should not do in real life.

– Ciara

Housing tops list of worries for low-income D.C. residents

POVERTY/HOUSING
In a new report, researchers surveyed more than 600 low-income District residents to examine their most persistent stressors. Survey results revealed that, by far, most poor residents found issues surrounding housing to be their biggest source of anxiety. (WaPo, 4/4)

The main takeaway: Finding and keeping affordable housing is by far the dominant stress among low-income residents — more so than concerns about food, education or domestic violence.

[…]

Sixty percent of respondents said they worried about not having any housing in the future.

– How the Federal Government Plans to Stop the ‘Worst-Case’ Housing Crisis (City Lab, 4/4)

COMMUNITY
– Jeanné Isler of the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy (NCRP) shares a recent conversation with WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland on WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series, and NCRP’s enthusiasm about what lies ahead beyond the series. (NCRP, 4/5)

– Congratulations to Amy Owen of the Community Foundation for Loudoun & Northern Fauquier Counties on being one of the Loudoun Times-Mirror’s 16 Women To Watch in 2016!

ARTS
– Brookland in northeast D.C. will soon have its own Arts Park, with support from corporations and donors, including  the D.C. Commission on the Arts & Humanities. (WCP, 4/4)

– Following a big revival in 2012, the Howard Theater continues to face struggles with financial woes. (WaPo, 4/4)

– With Studio Space Scarce In D.C., Fillmore School Building To Offer Reprieve (WAMU, 4/5)

SOCIAL PROFITS | Exponent Philanthropy makes the case for funders to invest in social profit sector talent in order to yield greater results on performance and impact. (Philanthrofiles, 4/5)

VIRGINIA | Though Fairfax County remains one of the nation’s wealthiest counties, it has been unable to avoid the pitfalls of a stagnant local economy amid an influx of new, often lower-income, residents. (WaPo, 4/2)

HEALTH/RACISMThe disturbing reason some African American patients may be undertreated for pain (WaPo, 4/4)

JOBS | The Council on Foundations is hiring for the position of Director, Corporate Philanthropy. Find out more here!


Oopsie!

– Ciara

A look at employment in the social profit sector through the Great Recession

WORKFORCE
New data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveal that during the Great Recession, as other industries cut back significantly on hiring and increased layoffs, the social profit sector continued to add jobs – a trend that is likely to reverse, for better or for worse. (WaPo, 3/2)

At the same time, organizations dipped into rainy day funds to stay afloat, resulting in a decline in asset levels. Some workers may have accepted lower wages for non-profit work because of the poor job market, boosting employment as well.

All of that is also why, when the bureau next puts out employment numbers, the figures might show a decrease: Resources are depleted, and the need also isn’t as great.

– A new JPMorgan Chase report, “Tech Jobs for All? Exploring the Promise and Pitfalls of Technology Training in the United States,” takes a look at the rapidly growing and quickly evolving tech training field and the unique obstacles it faces in developing the skilled and diverse workforce required to meet a growing need within the economy. The report is part of  JPMorgan Chase’s $250 million, five-year New Skills at Work initiative to address the mismatch between employer needs and the skills of job seekers..

Opinion: Jobs for the Young in Poor Neighborhoods (NYT, 3/14)

WRAG/RACISM | In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland poses the question, “When was the last time you talked about racism?,” and explains her view on why you should start. (Daily, 3/15)

COMMUNITY/VIRGINIA | Opinion: Lynn Tadlock, Deputy Executive Director of Giving of the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation and WRAG board chair, shares her views on why urgent reform is necessary to put an end to gerrymandering in the state of Virginia. (Loudoun Times, 3/3)

HIV/AIDS | Eight American cities joined the Fast Track Cities Initiative, established on World AIDS Day in 2014 “to ensure that 90% of people living with HIV know that they have the virus, are taking anti-retroviral treatment medications and in so doing, are keeping the virus suppressed.” Take a look at what those cities, including the District, have been doing to successfully lower their HIV/AIDS rates and increase awareness. Kudos to the Washington AIDS Partnership for being recognized for their work! (Mic, 3/10)

POVERTY | Federal assistance for families in poverty can cover expenses like food, health care, and housing, but with data showing that families in the lowest-income quintile spend around 14 percent of their after-tax income on diapers, advocates are seeking ways to further support those in need with household necessities. (WaPo, 3/14)

HEALTH/EQUITY | WAMU unveils a new, four-part series on the continuing struggle for inclusion that those with developmental disabilities in the District face. (WAMU,  3/ 2016)

ARTS/PHILANTHROPY | Americans Support Increases for Government Arts Funding (ArtsBlog, 3/5)


Perhaps the only thing more significant than turning 100-years-old is being able to do it with three of your lifelong friends.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – August 3 through August 7, 2015

THIS WEEK IN SOCIAL PROFITS
– WRAG president Tamara Copeland shared why she’s so committed to making sure we all update our language from “nonprofit” to “social profit,” in order to better reflect the value that many of us provide to society. (Daily, 8/3)

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS
– The Mellon Foundation released the first comprehensive survey on diversity in American art museums. (Mellon Foundation, 7/29)

THIS WEEK IN VIRGINIA
– The Commonwealth Institute released a new roadmap for building a brighter future for Virginia’s residents. The report includes policy recommendations for issues around access to education, access to health care, tax reform, and workforce training. (The Commonwealth Institute, 8/4)

THIS WEEK IN AFFORDABLE HOUSING
– In their annual report, Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies found that 46 percent of renters in the metropolitan Washington area are considered to be cost burdened (meaning they spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing), while 22.4 percent of renters in the area are considered to be severely cost burdened (meaning they spend more than half of their income on housing). (WCP, 7/31)

THIS WEEK IN THE ECONOMY/REGION
The Urban Institute released a new report examining the unequal distribution of retail and food establishments in the District. The inequitable distribution of businesses, as well as income disparities across the city, were shown to have a number of implications for residents. (WaPo, 8/4)


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK

Corporate Philanthropy Affinity Group: Getting media traction for your CSR story (WRAG’s corporate or potential corporate members only)
Wednesday, August 12, 2015  12:00 pm – 2:00 pm (Bank of America)

Get on the Map: A How-To Webinar
Thursday, August 13  2:00 pm – 2:45 pm


Bespoke water?! Hey, it could happen one day.

-Ciara