Tag: seniors

Resources run low for seniors in need

FOOD/SENIORS
In D.C., individuals over the age of 60 make up a growing number of the population. As a large portion of those seniors experience hunger, resources are not currently available to meet demands (WAMU, 7/3):

About 16 percent of the District’s population is over 60. That’s about 107,000 people. Roughly half of them access some type of social service through the District’s Office on Aging [DCOA]. But a much-needed program to feed some of our most vulnerable neighbors may have run out of money.

[…]

DCOA says that new enrollments for the delivery program are on temporary hold, but an additional $200,000 has been secured for next fiscal year. The agency says eligible seniors can access other food sources such as free vouchers for grocery stores and farmer’s markets as well free lunches at 52 centers.

The Catch-22 is that many of the seniors who are eligible for home meal delivery can’t access those other options, which is precisely why they qualify for home meal delivery.

COMMUNITY | The Community Foundation for Northern Virginia welcomes their new board chair, Paul Leslie, CEO of Dovel Technologies. Leslie replaces WRAG Vice Chair and Deputy Executive Director of Giving at the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation, K. Lynn Tadlock.

HEALTH | Opinion: Paying People to Be Healthy Usually Works, if the Public Can Stomach It (NYT, 7/6)

EDUCATION/YOUTH | Experts point to extraordinarily high rates of transient students as one factor that makes schooling more difficult for youth enrolled in DCPS. (WaPo, 7/4)

PHILANTHROPY | As Greece struggles with a financial crisis, there are some lessons philanthropy can learn from the ongoing situation. (Spear’s, 7/1)


How do you usually spend your time?

– Ciara

Housing tops reason for moving out of the District

HOUSING
New data from the D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer examines why people opt to move in and out of the District. For many, the choice to leave comes directly down to housing (WSJ, 6/9):

Between 2000 and 2014, about 165,500 people moved into the District either because of a new job or a job transfer. Attending college and wanting an easier commute are also top reasons for moving into the District.

By contrast, nearly 494,000 people moved out of the District between 2000 and 2014 for housing reasons, like better housing or a better neighborhood, to buy a home, or for cheaper housing expenses.

Of those who moved out of the District between 2000 and 2014, 42 percent moved to Maryland or Virginia.

– In many areas, Housing Choice Vouchers – meant, in part, to break up concentrations of poverty and create more mixed-income neighborhoods – have yet to diversify neighborhoods as intended. (Atlantic, 6/8)

Popped: D.C. Restricts Pop-Ups, Condo Conversions In Residential Neighborhoods (WAMU, 6/9)

COMMUNITY/CSR | Congratulations to WRAG members Booz Allen Hamilton, Capital One, and Kaiser Permanente for being named finalists in this year’s Fairfax County Chamber of Commerce Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards in the category of Outstanding Corporate Citizen of the Year (Large Business). Booz Allen Hamilton took home the honor at last week’s ceremony.

AGING/LGBT | Many LGBT seniors face uncertainty over housing when it comes to finding safe, supportive options. Soon, a nonprofit in D.C. will provide just that with a new development. Very few like it exist in the country. (Elevation, 6/8)

RACIAL EQUITY 
Opinion: With no shortage of shocking new data in the media about the plight of black families in America, one long-running narrative is that black fathers are more than likely absent from the lives of their children. In this op-ed, one writer seeks to break down the common rhetoric with a different take on the numbers. (NYT, 6/8)

How to Tell a Lie With Numbers: Racial Mythologies (NPQ, 6/8)

PHILANTHROPY/NONPROFITS | After launching an initiative that sought to shift relationships between foundations and nonprofits, The Chronicle of Philanthropy shares some of the challenges involved in that project, and provides recommendations for each group to undertake in order to further improve communications. (Chronicle, 6/8)

MARYLAND | Montgomery County’s Unemployment Rate Drops to Lowest Point in Seven Years (Bethesda Beat, 5/8)


In Virginia, an unintentional monument, you can’t visit just yet

– Ciara

Friday roundup – April 20 through April 24, 2015

THIS WEEK IN AGING/POVERTY
Many older Americans across the U.S. are experiencing food insecurity, a lingering effect of the Great Recession that has not yet shown signs of recovery for the growing senior population. According to a new report ranking each state’s percentage of seniors facing the threat of hunger, the Greater Washington region’s senior population is among those facing hard times. (WaPo, 4/23)

A new national report on food insecurity among older Americans ranks the District fourth, just behind Mississippi.

The report says that more than 20 percent of the District’s elderly have concerns about eating enough food or the right kind of food, compared with more than 24 percent of seniors in Mississippi.

The estimates of senior hunger range from about 8 percent in Minnesota to more than 26 percent in Arkansas, which was ranked highest among states where seniors face the threat of hunger. Virginia and Maryland both had rates of about 14 percent.

The Atlantic explored the economic inequalities that exist for many Americans well beyond retirement age, despite the shared experiences of growing older that most seniors endure. (Atlantic, 4/20)

THIS WEEK IN COMMUNITY/EVENTS
– Lynn Tadlock, Vice Chair of WRAG’s board and Deputy Executive Director of Giving at the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation, discussed the upcoming Loudoun County Philanthropy Conference on May 14 and how it aims to strengthen the “three-legged stool” of government, business, and the social sector to meet the often unnoticed needs of Loudoun County. (Daily, 4/22)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION/BUDGETS
– Prince George’s County braced itself for what could potentially be a $20 million loss in state school funding. (Gazette, 4/22)

D.C. schools budget includes wide range in per-student spending (WaPo, 4/23)

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION/ECONOMY
National Parks Brought $1.4 Billion to the D.C. Region in 2014 (DCist, 4/24)


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK

Northern Virginia LEG: The Art of Successful Site Visits (co-sponsored with Exponent Philanthropy and the Southeastern Council of Foundations)
Wednesday, April 29  10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Brightest Minds: Dr. Isabel Sawhill on Creating a New Ethic of Responsible Parenthood (WRAG members and non-members)
Thursday, April 30  9:30 AM – 11:30 AM (At PNC Bank)


Today is the Library of Congress’ 215th birthday! Find out what’s actually in there.

– Ciara

Disparities follow many into retirement

AGING/POVERTY/EQUITY
We hear a lot of talk about racial wealth disparities among America’s current workforce, but another, less-buzzed about piece of the puzzle is the racial retirement savings gap that is leaving many aging Americans without a safety net. (WaPo, 2/18)

White families had over $100,000 more in average liquid retirement savings in 2013 than African American and Hispanic families, according to an analysis done by the Urban Institute, which released a series of charts illustrating wealth inequality in America. That difference has quadrupled since 1989, when white families had $25,000 more in average retirement savings than minorities.

In terms of ratios, white families went from having five times the average savings held by minorities, to having between seven and 11 times the average amount.

CSR | Rachel Tappis, associate director of community impact at The Advisory Board Company and current Institute of CSR participant, shares why she is already excited for session two in March! (Daily, 2/19)

HOMELESSNESS | Opinion: The New York Times feature, “Room for Debate,” examines multiple approaches to tackling the issue of homelessness through the eyes of leaders and researchers in the field. Here, you can read the perspectives of each debater on how best to approach homeless services. (NYT, 2/19)

More cities have adopted a homeless policy which might seem like common sense – give homeless people housing. Proponents say it saves money over time and is more humane. Opponents call it a naive approach to a complicated problem, which also costs too much.

Is giving homeless people homes more effective and sensible than making them stay in shelters or on the street?

– The Montgomery County Planning Board unanimously voted to bring a 21-unit transitional housing project to Silver Spring, MD. (Gazette, 2/19)

LGBT
– The District’s Office of GLBT Affairs (newly retitled as the Office of LGBT Affairs), the D.C. Department of Health, along with the help of a private research organization, are joining forces to conduct a comprehensive health survey that seeks to inform health advocacy initiatives geared toward the LBGT community. For the first time, data will also be collected on transgender individuals. (Daily, 1/23 and Washington Blade, 2/18)

Why LGBTQ Seniors Need a Housing Strategy of Their Own (CityLab, 2/18)

EDUCATION
– The end of third grade is an integral benchmark for future student success in math and reading. For that reason, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and DC Action for Children’s DC KIDS COUNT project takes a look at the District’s neighborhoods where third graders made the largest gains in reading between 2007 and 2014, and the areas that saw the largest decline. (WCP, 2/19)

– Nation’s high school graduation rate ticks up for second year in a row (WaPo, 2/12) You can also see the 2012 graduation rates for the region.

PHILANTHROPY/NONPROFITS | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations has released their new digital publication, Strengthening Nonprofit Capacity, with guidance for funders on how to design an impactful approach customized to their grantees. (GEO, 2/5)


The Academy Awards are coming up! Someone has sifted through each of this year’s nominations to find out what’s worth watching so you don’t have to. Or maybe you should just watch them all. It’ll be far too cold to go outside anytime soon anyway!

– Ciara