Tag: safety

Decriminalizing sex work in the District

PUBLIC HEALTH/CRIMINAL JUSTICE | A coalition of sex workers and their advocates have introduced a bill, the Community Safety and Health Amendment Act of 2019, to decriminalize the sale and purchase of sex in the District. (CP, 6/3)

The world of people who sell sex for money in DC is not a monolith with one blanket policy need … among their ranks are those who sell sex by choice; those who sell sex to survive, feed their children, and stave off homelessness; and those who sell sex against their will because they’ve been trafficked. Under the current law in DC, police can arrest and charge anyone who sells sex and under this new bill, police would no longer have cause or power to employ this tactic for catching sellers of sex mid-sale—a change that many sex workers and their advocates enthusiastically endorse.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | Minneapolis ended exclusive single-family zoning. Could the DC region do the same? (WBJ, 6/6)

LGBTQIA | DC’s LGTBQIA communities continue to fight for some basic rights—and celebrate their victories, too. (CP, 6/6)

ENVIRONMENT
Key Urban Agriculture Programs Delayed as City Swaps Who Will Manage Them (CP, 6/7)

– Michael Bloomberg’s foundation said that he will donate $500 million to a new campaign to close every coal-fired power plant in the United States and halt the growth of natural gas. (NYT, 6/6)

MARYLAND | Residents voice concerns over Montgomery County policing (WTOP, 6/7)

DC/CULTURE | The DC Public Library is launching a three-part Go-Go Book Club, in collaboration with Washington Performing Arts and the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. (dcist, 6/6)

TRANSIT/CLIMATE | Maryland and Virginia plan to expand roads, in defiance of their own climate goals (GGWash, 6/6)

GENTRIFICATION | What’s In A Name? Residents East Of The Anacostia River Say, ‘Everything.’  (WAMU, 6/7)

PHILANTHROPY
– A new report,  Nonprofit Executives and the Racial Leadership Gap, details that people of color who lead nonprofits face barriers and challenges that their white counterparts don’t. (Chronicle, 6/4)

– Fund the People has launched the Talent Justice Initiative to help funders and nonprofits invest in intersectional racial equity across the nonprofit career lifecycle and workforce.

– Has the Giving Pledge Changed Giving? (Chronicle, 6/4)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Director | Open Society Institute-Baltimore – New!
Director, School Partnerships Coach | Flamboyan Foundation – New!
Senior Director of Development, Research & Innovation | Children’s Hospital Foundation – New!
Senior Program Manager | Rising Tide Foundation
Development Manager | Mikva Challenge DC
Foundation Director | Venable LLP
Development Associate | Sitar Arts Center
Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Blueberries all day, every day

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday!

– Buffy

Landmark education bill will reshape Maryland’s public school system

EDUCATION | A landmark education bill designed to reshape Maryland’s public school system will become law without Gov. Larry Hogan’s signature, and will send an additional $855 million to schools over the next two years. (WaPo, 5/15)

Over the next two years, the funding will pay for school-based health centers, grants for schools where at least 80 percent of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals, raises for teachers — the state will provide a 1.5 percent raise if the local district gives 3 percent — and grants to improve teacher standards.

The Maryland Commission on Innovation and Excellence, also known as the Kirwan Commission, was asked in 2016 to devise a plan to create a world-class school system in Maryland and ensure that all students, regardless of race and ethnicity, are “college- and career-ready” by 10th grade. The Kirwan Commission also was charged with coming up with funding formulas to pay for the plan, but the panel released its recommendations this year without a breakdown of how the state and local governments would share the costs.

IMMIGRATION | Between 75 and 150 adult adoptees in the District and up to 1,700 Virginians are at risk of being deported. (WAMU, 5/15)

RACIAL EQUITY/HEALTH
– An emergency Task Force on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health has been created by the Congressional Black Caucus to address access to mental health care and suicide among Black youth, including those who are LGBTQIA. (Washington Blade, 5/7)

Opioid Addiction Drug Going Mostly To Whites, Even As Black Death Rate Rises (NPR, 5/8)

CENSUS | Mayor Bowser officially kicked off the District’s 2020 Census efforts by presenting a proclamation to honor the selection of her Complete Count Committee.

CHILDREN/SAFETY | A Centers for Disease Control study has found that 1 in 14 public and charter high school students in DC has exchanged sex for something of value. Students who had been kicked out of their homes, run away or been abandoned were most likely to have exchanged sex.  (WAMU, 5/16)

HEALTHCARE | How safe are Greater Washington’s hospitals? Some earn top grades for quality and safety, and others don’t score as well. (WBJ, 5/16)

ARTS | Mayor Muriel Bowser Wants Big Changes for the City’s Arts Commission (CP, 5/16)

WOMEN/EQUALITY | June 4 marks the 100-year anniversary of Congress’ passage of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution, and there are a number of places around the Greater Washington region to learn the history of women’s suffrage. (WAMU, 5/16)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors – New!
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table – New!
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners – New!
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Communications, Technology, and Administration | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Architecture is like a tree … it grows and matures and branches out. I am part of that tree, of that movement, not starting, or ending, or following anything.” I.M. Pei has died at 102.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Thursday and Friday!

– Buffy

New committee to address disproportionate maternal mortality among African-American women in DC

HEALTH/RACE
– Joining nearly 30 other jurisdictions, including Maryland and Virginia, a new Maternal Mortality Review Committee has been created to address the disproportionate death rates of African-American women in the District. The committee is made up of various maternal health experts and was formed after several years of calls to study the deaths of pregnant women and new mothers in DC. (WAMU, 4/12)

With rates double that of the nation’s, Washington is home to a decades-long maternal mortality crisis. Nearly 75 percent of District mothers who died of complications from pregnancy, labor and childbirth between 2014 and 2016 were African American. Nationally, black women are three to four times more likely to die than white women. According to the CDC, nationally, from 2011 to 2013, black women experienced roughly 43.5 deaths per 100,000 live births on average, compared to 12.7 deaths for white mothers. One reason for the disparity, says Ebony Marcelle, Director of midwifery at Community of Hope’s Family Health and Birth Center, is that the health risks associated with childbirth are coupled with racial bias in the medical field. Black women, she says, are often dismissed or ignored by health care providers.

COMMUNITY | Crystal Carr Townsend, President of the Healthcare Initiative Foundation, WRAG Board Member, and member of WRAG’s Healthy Communities Working Group, is profiled in Bethesda Magazine. The piece highlights HIF’s work in Germantown to build a collaborative approach to ensuring that low-income families have critical health and wellness services. (Bethesda Magazine, 4/8)

EQUITY | Banks in DC are increasingly concentrated in affluent neighborhoods, while other areas that could benefit from more banking options are still underserved by financial institutions. (WAMU, 4/10)

HOUSING 
– A new bill in the DC Council would require the creation of more affordable housing when quasi-governmental agencies sell or redevelop their own properties. (WBJ, 4/10)

RACE/EDUCATION | Georgetown Students Vote On Proposal To Make Amends For University’s Slaveholding Past (WAMU, 4/11)

EDUCATION/SAFETY | Pre-K and elementary students are learning safety skills on their new kid-sized roadway at Thomas Elementary School in Northeast DC. (WAMU, 4/1)

PHILANTHROPY
– How and why funders can invest more in the pro-immigrant movement. (NCRP, 4/11)

–  This Is What A Philanthropist Looks Like (Refinery29, 4/9)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Director of Institutional Writing and Strategy​ | ​League of Conservation Voters Education Fund – New!
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation – New!
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation – New!
Development Director​ | ​Greater DC Diaper Bank
Program & Marketing Coordinator​ | ​ACT for Alexandria
Grants Manager, Data and Reporting​ | ​The Colorado Health Organization
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Racial Justice Program Officer​ | ​Wellspring Philanthropic Fund
Program Officer​ | ​The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
President and CEO | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Grants Program Specialist | Jack and Jill Foundation
Director of Development Partnerships – New England | League of Conservation Voters
Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation
Program Manager | DC127
Development Manager  | DC127
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase
Programs Officer | DC Bar Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Spring has sprung, and our region has over 100 public gardens to prove it.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday next week!

– Buffy

Helping returning citizens join the workforce

WORKFORCE | Finding a job within the first two months of release from a correctional facility cuts down recidivism dramatically. The Greater Baltimore Committee has released a new report it hopes will help Maryland returning citizens find work. The report recommends different initiatives for businesses, nonprofits and government agencies. (Baltimore Sun, 12/8)

The coalition proposed the state establish an Office of Re-entry within the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services to coordinate services for inmates before release.

A “peer network” should be set up as well, the report said, staffed by ex-offenders who would help former prisoners find housing, vocational training, child care, jobs, and mental health and substance abuse treatment. The report suggested the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation should coordinate with the corrections department to align prison workforce training with employers needs.

-Maryland Governor Hogan has proposed an alternative paid sick leave bill (Bethesda Beat, 12/7)

CHILDREN & FAMILIES | A young mother moves into her new apartment after graduating from Sasha Bruce Youthwork’s transitional housing program (WaPo, 12/8)

EDUCATION | Elementary school children in Maryland may soon be allowed to bring their cell phones to school (WaPo, 12/7)

SAFETY | One Year After Launching Vision Zero, D.C. Sees No Reduction In Traffic Fatalities (WAMU, 12/7)

ENVIRONMENT | ‘Flushable’ wipes might need to meet a new standard for D.C. toilets (WaPo, 12/7)

PHILANTHROPY
-The Annie E. Casey Foundation, with the help of the Foundation Center, has launched an online resource tool featuring data on disconnected youth. The collection includes reports, case studies, and insights focused on the challenges these youth face. (PND, 12/6)

-The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Office for International and Philanthropic Innovation has launched a newsletter to better inform its partners on its work at the federal level and how that impacts and supports communities across the country. Read the lastest issue here

INNOVATION | OpinionA Year of Big Ideas in Social Change (NYT, 12/6)


Imagine that you could buy a loaf of bread for 7 cents. Now marvel at these other cheap expenses.

-Kendra

Survey looks at perceptions of public safety in the District

DISTRICT 
A newly-released survey of District residents aims to provide a baseline idea of perceptions of public safety throughout the city and encourage greater collaboration with neighborhood police. The report (by the Community Preservation and Development Corporation (CPDC), the Council for Court Excellence, and the Local Initiatives Support Corporation) finds that residents in Ward 8 feel the least safe compared to residents in other areas of the city. (PR Web, 6/28)

District of Columbia residents who live in Ward 8 feel the least safe of any in the city, are more likely to have observed or experienced a violent crime, and are least likely to trust police than others who live here.

[…]

The survey findings come amid heightened concern about rising rates of homicides in major cities nationally. While data from the DC Metropolitan Police Department show that property crime is down and violent crime is level in the District as compared to a year ago, there has been a troubling spike in homicides. According to a recent report for the Department, between 2014 and 2015, there was a 54% increase in the number of homicides across DC with the increase mostly concentrated in the Northeast and Southeast quadrants. Between January and May of 2016, the number of homicides in Ward 7 tripled from the rate during the same period a year ago.

The full report, Perceptions of Public Safety, can be found here.

HEALTH/COMMUNITY | Jennifer Schitter, principal health planner at the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, shares the partnership between their Region Forward Committee and WRAG’s Healthy Communities Working Group on a collective, cross-sector approach to shed light on how social, economic, and environmental factors influence health at the zip code level. (Daily, 6/28)

Related: The Healthy Communities Working Group has also just released their Theory of Change, illustrating a vision toward a better region “where communities across all jurisdictions are thriving, and all people are living their lives to their fullest potential.”

PHILANTHROPY | On Exponent Philanthropy‘s blog, Katherine B. Wright, executive director of the Wright Family Foundation, shares how her family’s organization stepped into the policy arena and witnessed the power of the collective voice of philanthropy. (Philanthrofiles, 6/24)

AGING
– According to a Freddie Mac survey of the housing plans and perceptions of people born before 1961, over five million in this age group anticipate moving to rental units by 2020, further placing pressure on low-income rental inventories. (Freddie Mac, 6/28)

– So you’re thinking about retirement? Find out which areas in the region were recently named among the best cities to do so. (ARLNow, 6/27)

– Nonprofit Work After Retirement? Maybe You Can Make It Pay (NYT, 6/24)


It is with a mix of sadness and excitement that I must share that today will be my last day at WRAG and writing The Daily WRAG :(  Rebekah Seder will be taking over once again – on a modified schedule – as I will be making my transition to another organization in the WRAG family. Sincere thanks to anyone who has ever responded to any of the weird things that I’ve posted down here, or has sent a kind note to let us know they are reading. I will certainly miss my colleagues I’ve had the great privilege of working with over the past couple years and am so happy to say that I won’t be going far. 

– Ciara

Parts of our region are among the most diverse in the country…Many DCPS teachers rate their principals less than effective…Medicaid changes could impact access to long-term care [News, 9.7.12]

DEMOGRAPHICS | A new study has found that some of the smaller suburban towns in the Greater Washington region are among the most diverse communities in the country. (WaPo, 9/7)

CHILDREN & YOUTH | Carol Thompson Cole, head of Venture Philanthropy Partners (and a WRAG board member), appeared on 9News Now yesterday to discuss VPP’s new Capital Kids report. (WUSA9, 9/6)

Related: The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has released an RFP focused on improving outcomes for young men and boys of color. (Thanks to the Consumer Health Foundation‘s Rachel Wick for passing this one along!)

EDUCATION
– In a survey, most DCPS teachers didn’t rate their principals very highly on a variety of measures. (Examiner, 9/7)

– A group of immigrant students recently met with DSPS Chancellor Kaya Henderson to discuss the need for more services for immigrant students learning English. (WaPo, 9/7) Be sure to read through to the end to find out how best to get a meeting with the chancellor.

HOUSING | The D.C. Housing Authority is moving forward with plans to redevelop the Barry Farm neighborhood. (WBJ, 9/6)

SAFETY | District police embrace concept of preventing crime through design (WaPo, 9/3)

POLITICS | The Chronicle of Philanthropy looks at President Obama’s impact on the social sector. (Chronicle, 9/4)

AGING | The election could have a big impact on how Medicaid is administered in the future, which will significantly affect the large number of middle class people who rely on the program for long-term care late in life. (NY Times, 9/7)

Related: For the past two years, WRAG’s Working Group on Aging focused on the long-term and direct care needs of the region’s aging population, particularly from a workforce development perspective. Here’s a look back at what the group learned:

Meeting the Growing Demand for a Direct Care Workforce (2/4/11)
Training a Quality Direct Care Workforce in the Greater Washington Region (5/17/11)
Examining the Potential for a Regional Direct Care Workforce (1/11/12)
Perspectives from Direct Care Workers (3/6/12)


Some clever Brazilians have figured out how to deal with one of my biggest pet peeves – drivers who stop on top of crosswalks.

-Rebekah

Exploring longer school days…Rubenstein donates $4.5 million to National Zoo…Catania on poverty in the District [News, 12.20.11]

EDUCATION | Greater Greater Washington looks at the track record of improved student performance due to longer school days and says that DCPS and the D.C. Council need to take leadership in calling for extended hours. (GGW, 12/20)

GIVING | Local philanthropist David Rubenstein has donated $4.5 million to the National Zoo to support its giant panda reproduction program. Among his many philanthropic investments, Rubenstein funds The Rubenstein Award for Highly Effective Teachers and the Rubenstein Award for Highly Effective Leaders, both of which are awarded at the annual Standing Ovation for DC Teachers event. (WaPo, 12/20)

Related: According to the National Zoo’s website, female pandas can only conceive for a period of 2-3 days per year.

POVERTY | Opinion: D.C. councilmember David Catania writes about the city’s struggle with poverty (HuffPo, 12/16):

Chronic unemployment and exclusion from economic security are problems that the District has grappled with for generations. The solution, however, is not likely to fall upon us at random nor is it simply a matter of implementing one perfect policy. The solution does not lie in begrudging those with education and jobs and it certainly does not lie in the oversimplification and victimization of those who have neither.

The real solution is to constantly and creatively implement public policies and programs that chip away at the walls that poverty has created in our communities.

RANKINGS | Here’s something to be proud of – an annual global survey of 152 countries says that Americans donate more than the residents of any other country. Last year, the United States ranked only fifth. (Chronicle, 12/20)

STING (SAFETY) | A year-long undercover operation by District police and the ATF has pulled 160 guns – and a rocket launcher – and $7 million worth of drugs off the streets. (WAMU, 12/20) Obviously this has a ripple effect that makes the whole region safer. Nice work, officers and agents!

ETHICS | This doesn’t seem right. Jack Johnson will collect nearly $50,000 a year from his county executive pension while he is in prison. It will total around $350,000 by the time his sentence is served. (WTOP, 12/20)

TRANSIT | The new 11th Street bridge span that crosses the Anacostia has been designated, somewhat unexpectedly, I-695. The whole thing is confusing and you can try to figure it out here. (HuffPo, 12/20)

WE’RE HIRING | WRAG is looking for a creative and talented individual to serve as our new Manager of Membership and Development. The ideal candidate will be a quick thinker and a team player who will lead the organization’s efforts in member recruitment, retention, and involvement, as well as fundraising and grants management activities. [Full job description.]

DAILY SCHEDULE | I’ll be away through the first week of January, so Rebekah will be filling for me on the Daily. We’ll be on a slightly abbreviated schedule – 4 posts this week, 2 next week, and 4 the following week.

HOLIDAYS | I visited the brand new White House Christmas Tree last night. It isn’t quite as impressive as the old one (yet). Lining the perimeter are smaller trees from each state, decorated by specially selected school classes. Here’s a look – with less-than-stellar lighting – at the trees from our region.

If you’re around, the National Menorah will be lit on the Ellipse tonight to celebrate the start of Hanukkah.


If you’re looking for an entertainment option over the holidays, I can’t speak highly enough about the experience of seeing Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol in IMAX. Yes, the tickets are overpriced, but the movie is truly spectacular and improved tenfold by the crystal clear, enormous IMAX screen with more than 12,000 watts of booming sound. And before you write-off the movie as popcorn entertainment, consider that it is one of the best-reviewed films of the year!

Happy holidays, folks. See you all in the new year!