Tag: Public Welfare Foundation

The home care workforce and systemic inequity

WORKFORCE/HEALTH/EQUITY
– As the population of Americans over the age of 65 rapidly increases, home care workers have become critical players in the healthcare system, performing the extremely necessary, but undervalued, services that help older adults stay in their homes. As home care workers are disproportionately women of color, their low wages and limited worker protections are an example of the intersections of structural racism and sexism in the workforce (City Lab, 10/11):

The big problem for home-care workers appears to be the same one that has plagued domestic workers since the days of black in-house “help”: that in-home service work has been subject to a gendering and racialization of labor that has largely carved it out of the labor movement, creating barriers to the kind of protections afforded to unions and industries mostly comprised of men. While organizations led by women of color have a strong history of organizing to advance the interests of in-home workers, domestic workers are still exempt from many provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act and the National Labor Relations Act. Home-care workers—as members of a more regulated industry where strikes and labor shortages directly endanger lives—are afforded more protections than domestic workers, but still lag far behind others in the health field. While home-care workers are much more likely to have health insurance than domestic workers, their wages often still fall well short of living wages. Home-care workers were only just granted full federal overtime and minimum wage protections in October 2015.

– This month the Consumer Health Foundation‘s blog is featuring a series of interviews related to the direct care workforce (which includes home care workers), highlighting how strengthening this workforce can both improve health care and advance economic justice. The first two interviews are with the Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute and Home Care Partners. (CHF, 10/4)

Related: Back in 2011-2012, a working group of WRAG members focused on aging convened a year-long series to examine issues related to the direct care workforce. Some of learnings are summed up in What Funders Need to Know: Quality Jobs = Quality Care.

JUSTICE
– A bill that would reform the District’s juvenile justice system just passed a first vote in the DC Council. (DCist, 10/11)

Md. attorney general’s office raises constitutionality questions about state’s cash bail system (WaPo, 10/11)

– Here’s an interview with the Public Welfare Foundation about their work to advance worker’s rights, criminal justice reform, and juvenile justice reform. (NCRP, Summer 2016)

HEALTH/YOUTH | Anti-tobacco bills advance in District, would raise age to buy cigarettes to 21 (WaPo, 10/11)

SOCIAL INNOVATION | The U.S. Department of Education has announced its first-ever Pay for Success awards, focused on scaling career and technical education programs and dual language early education programs.

PHILANTHROPY | Opinion: Ditch Strategic Philanthropy — but Don’t Throw Out Strategy With It (Chronicle, 10/4)


Check out these amazing entries for the National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest.

– Rebekah

Friday roundup – April 11 through April 15, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG
– We released the second video in the Putting Racism on the Table series, featuring Dr. Robin DiAngelo, former professor of education and author of What Does It Mean to be White?, speaking on white privilege. After viewing, we encourage you to share your thoughts on the series or on the specific topic via Twitter using the hashtag #PuttingRacismOnTheTable, or by commenting on WRAG’s Facebook page. We also suggest checking out the viewing guide and discussion guide to be used with the video. Both can be found on our website.

THIS WEEK IN PHILANTHROPY
 In an update to WRAG’s Beyond Dollars report originally published in 2009, former managing director Kristin Pauly of The Prince Charitable Trusts provided the latest on their efforts to help protect a cultural and environmental asset in Virginia, and presented a new documentary on the fight, When Mickey Came to Town. (Daily, 4/13)

Opinion: Public Welfare Foundation president and WRAG Board member Mary McClymont shed light on the need for long overdue reforms to the civil justice system, and the need for more foundations to support civil legal aid for vulnerable citizens. (Chronicle, 4/8)

– Consumer Health Foundation (CHF) president and WRAG Board member Yanique Redwood, and administrative and communications assistant Kendra Allen, shared how CHF has used learning journeys to further connect with their grantees and view their work from a different perspective. (NCRP, 4/7)

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION
– Editorial: The Washington Post took a look at recent violent crime occurring in the District’s wards 7 and 8, and the importance of tackling social issues that are often factors in crime. (WaPo, 4/11)

– Why Virginia is shaking up its economic development strategy (WBJ, 4/12)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


How did you know when you were officially an adult?

– Ciara

Income, geography, and shorter life expectancies

HEALTH/NATIONAL
A new study, based on the tax and Social Security records of everyone in the U.S. between 1999 and 2014, examines how income and geography profoundly affect life expectancies for Americans (WaPo, 4/11):

Overall, the new study offers the most exhaustive account yet of the rich-poor gap in American life expectancy. The data reveal that life expectancies continuously rise with income in America: The modestly poor live longer than the very poor, and the super-rich live longer than the merely rich.

A new divide in American death (WaPo, 4/10)

PHILANTHROPY
Opinion: In this op-ed, Public Welfare Foundation president and WRAG Board member Mary McClymont sheds light on the need for long overdue reforms to the civil justice system, and the need for more foundations to support civil legal aid for vulnerable citizens. (Chronicle, 4/8)

Consumer Health Foundation (CHF) president and WRAG Board member Yanique Redwood, and CHF Administrative and Communications Assistant Kendra Allen, share how their organization has used learning journeys to further connect with their grantees and view their work from a different perspective. (NCRP, 4/7)

COMMUNITY 
– Congratulations to Washington Area Women’s Foundation president Jennifer Lockwood-Shabat and her team for receiving Leadership Greater Washington’s 2016 Innovative Community Partner of the Year award! The award was sponsored by The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation.

CSR | The Advisory Board Company has released their 2016 Corporate Social Responsibility Report, detailing their investments in their CSR program, Community Impact, over the past two years.

INCOME INEQUALITYIs America Having the Wrong Conversation About Income Inequality? (Atlantic, 4/6)

HOUSINGDoes job growth strengthen a region’s housing market? (GGW, 4/8)

JOBS
Exponent Philanthropy seeks a Chief Program Officer

Wellspring Advisors is currently hiring for a Children’s Anti Poverty Program Officer.


 In what may be the coolest science project ever, a toy dog goes where no toy dog has ever gone before

– Ciara

Friday roundup – February 29 through March 4, 2016

THIS WEEK IN THE DISTRICT/POVERTY
– Ed Lazere, executive director of the DCFPI, shared with us what legislation to extend TANF could mean to a number of households in the District. (Daily, 3/3)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– Following the launch of WRAG’s 2016 Public Education Speaker Series last week with Dr. Matthew Biel, Director of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Georgetown University Medical Center, speaking on the impact of toxic stress on children’s development, we shared some of his compelling points. (Daily 2/29)

THIS WEEK IN PHILANTHROPY
– The Executives’ Alliance for Boys & Men of Color announced the ‘Ban the Box Philanthropy Challenge,’ calling for U.S. philanthropic institutions to adopt fair chance hiring policies. Participating and supporting organizations include: Butler Family Fund, Consumer Health Foundation, Council on FoundationsOpen Society Foundations, and Public Welfare Foundation.

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS
– The Theatre Communications Group is taking nominations for D.C. area early-career leaders of color in social-profit theater to participate in their Rising Leaders of Color program, designed to “change the face of the theatre field by nurturing and supporting an inter-generational network of leaders of color at various stages in their careers.”

THIS WEEK IN FOOD
– Researchers have created a tool, called the U.S. IMPACT Food Policy Model, that demonstrates how the pricing of healthy foods affects health outcomes. (NPR, 3/2)

– Denmark is emerging as a  leader in the fight against food waste. (NPR, 3/1)

– The Instagrams of Food Deserts (Atlantic, 3/1)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Ever wonder how we’ve come to love certain animals as pets, and turn our noses up at the sight of others?

– Ciara

Rising poverty rates in Virginia schools bring challenges

VIRGINIA/POVERTY/EDUCATION
Over the past several years, some Northern Virginia schools have seen a stark increase in the number of students who live in poverty. Particularly in Fairfax County, school administrators continue to try to meet the growing needs of students amid budget constraints. (WAMU, 3/1)

In the last decade, school administrators across Northern Virginia noticed a marked increased in the number of students who live in poverty. Nowhere was the trend more pitched than Manassas, where the percentage of students living in poverty increased from 24 to nearly 58 percent in the last 10 years.

RELATED: Yesterday, we shared some of the important points made by Dr. Matthew Biel, Director of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Georgetown University Medical Center, at the first session of WRAG’s 2016 Public Education Speaker Series where he spoke on the impact of toxic stress on children’s development stemming from a number of issues like housing instability and food insecurity. (Daily 2/29)

PHILANTHROPY
– The Hill-Snowdon Foundation has launched a new website for their Making Black Lives Matter Initiative (MBLM). The site will provide background on the MBLM Initiative, focused on “supporting black-led organizing in order to help revitalize and strengthen the institutional and political power of the black community.” The website also introduces the Black Social Change Funders Network  a network to help foundations and donors accelerate their interest in supporting black-led social change – in partnership with the Association of Black Foundation Executives.

Venture Philanthropy Partners, in association with Prince George’s County administration, public schools, local business leaders, philanthropy, and social profit organizations, recently launched the Ready for Work initiative, aimed at providing students with real work experiences prior to graduation from high school. (VPP, 2/2016)

– The Executives’ Alliance for Boys & Men of Color have announced a ‘Ban the Box Philanthropy Challenge,’ calling for U.S. philanthropic institutions to adopt fair chance hiring policies. Participating and supporting organizations include: Butler Family Fund, Consumer Health Foundation, Council on FoundationsOpen Society Foundations, and Public Welfare Foundation.

– Funders for LGBTQ Issues has released their 2014 Tracking Report, analyzing 4,552 grants from 313 foundations funding LGBTQ issues within that calendar year. You can view the comprehensive assessment and its accompanying infographic here. (Funders for LGBTQ Issues, 2/25)

IMMIGRATION/YOUTH/REGION | Remaking High School for Immigrant Kids (City Lab, 2/29)

CSR | In his latest blog post, Tim McClimon, president of the American Express Foundation and head faculty member for the Institute for CSR, examines the challenges facing many CSR professionals today in keeping millennial leaders engaged. (American Express, 2/29)

ARTS | The Theatre Communications Group is taking nominations for D.C. area early-career leaders of color in social-profit theater to participate in their Rising Leaders of Color program, designed to “change the face of the theatre field by nurturing and supporting an inter-generational network of leaders of color at various stages in their careers.”


Check out this trailer for what is probably the only right way to do a film about the life of Vincent Van Gogh. 

– Ciara

WRAG Board elects 2016 board officers

WRAG
WRAG is excited to announce that this week the WRAG Board elected the following members to serve as new and returning board officers beginning in 2016:

ChairLynn Tadlock, Claude Moore Charitable Foundation
Vice ChairYanique Redwood, Consumer Health Foundation
TreasurerAnna Bard, Wells Fargo
Secretary – Mary McClymont, Public Welfare Foundation

CHILDREN/REGION
– DC Action for Children has released a new analysis based on 20 indicators of well-being to determine the state of children in the District’s eight wards. In some wards, children and their families are being left behind in an ever-growing city (WCP, 12/8):

Wards 5, 7, and 8 contain some of the largest numbers of children yet have the lowest median family incomes, even as the median income in D.C. increased by roughly 18 percent between 2010 and 2013. At least one in five children in Wards 1, 5, 6, 7, and 8 live in poverty, the analysis reports; the total child poverty rate in D.C. dropped by less than one percent during the same period.

– Another study sheds light on the high costs of child care for parents in the U.S. – and especially D.C., Maryland, and Virginia. As child care costs rival that of sending a young adult to college, the report by Child Care Aware urges Congress to take action. (WTOP, 12/8)

HOUSING | Why it’s so hard to afford a rental even if you make a decent salary (WaPo, 12/9)

ECONOMY/REGION | A recent gathering of three elected leaders from D.C., Maryland, and Virginia show that top leaders are starting to think more regionally. (WaPo, 12/8)

PHILANTHROPY 
Opinion: Author, chief executive of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, and previous WRAG Annual Meeting speaker Emmett Carson, shares in this open letter why he believes the Council on Foundations and Independent Sector should merge to build a stronger, more integrated network for the social profit sector. (Chronicle, 12/4)

Opinion: 3 Key Ideas on the Power of the Zuckerberg-Chan Pledge (Chronicle, 12/8)

HEALTH/HOMELESSNESS | The Atlantic explores the dynamic of a family in shelter with four young children as the parents participate in a program that aims to strengthen the bonds among homeless families that are often strained due to overwhelming stress. (Atlantic, 12/8)


Here are a few of the books Bill Gates says you should be reading right now.

– Ciara

 

Increasing access to farm-fresh foods

FOOD/REGION
More organizations in the region, like Martha’s Table, are focusing on making farm-fresh foods available to low-income families at farmers markets, increasing access to healthy foods they may not otherwise be able to afford. (WaPo, 8/23)

Because many can’t afford it, healthy food is swapped for cheaper and more fattening foods, said Caron Gremont, the charity’s senior director of healthy eating. It also means, she said, that the families are less likely to shop at farmers markets, learning about new produce or healthy recipe ideas.

[…]

The District and neighboring counties have seen a steady increase in farmers markets accepting federal Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program assistance, according to District data. In 2004, only 23 markets in the District, Prince George’s and Montgomery counties accepted WIC; by 2014 that number had nearly tripled to 60.

COMMUNITY | Congratulations to the Public Welfare Foundation for being recognized with the National Association of Pretrial Services Agencies’ Partners Award for their support of pretrial detention reform focused on keeping more people out of jail and decreasing mass incarceration. (PWF, 8/21)

HOMELESSNESS/YOUTH | The Washington Post offers a look at the District’s first-ever count of homeless youth and the difficulties that come along with getting an accurate count. (WaPo, 8/23)

EDUCATION
– A recent financial report finds that the great majority of donations go to just a small minority of the District’s 60 public charter schools. (WaPo, 8/22)

Virginia’s Public Schools Need More Money For Teachers, Say Education Advocates (WAMU, 8/21)

– In an effort to bring greater equity to schools across the city, DCPS is launching a new “Cornerstone” initiative this year, where all students will participate in a series of grade- and subject-specific programs to share common learning experiences regardless of where they attend school. (WAMU, 8/24)

HEALTH CARE/RACIAL EQUITY | Can Health Care Be Cured of Racial Bias? (NPR, 8/20)

HOUSING
– The Housing Opportunities Commission of Montgomery County has unveiled a new online portal for residents to submit information and be connected to all available housing assistance. Though the county’s waitlist for Housing Choice Vouchers has been closed for eight years, officials hope the new system will make those in need aware of other services that can help. (Bethesda Magazine, 8/21)

– Housing prices in Arlington County and the District are the highest in the region, with Arlington County’s prices recently pulling further ahead of D.C.’s (WBJ, 8/20)

SOCIAL PROFITS | This fall, United Way of the National Capital Area is offering a series of workshops to assist social profit representatives in the region with community reach and leadership skill building. Click here to learn more information and to register for the learning series.


See if you can identify these countries turned upside down on a map.

-Ciara 

In Virginia, disappearing jobs in the middle

VIRGINIA/WORKFORCE
The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis takes a close look at the disappearance of middle-wage jobs in the state of Virginia, and the effect on residents. While the number of available middle wage-jobs has dropped, the number of low- and high-paying jobs has grown since the recession, creating a situation that makes it difficult to climb the career ladder (The Half Sheet, 5/29):

In May 2014, the latest year for which data are available, there were 27,400 fewer jobs in mid-wage occupations – those paying on average $15.33 to $23.13 an hour – than there were in May 2013.

That’s on top of the loss of nearly 70,000 jobs in that wage range between 2007 and 2010. There’s been some ups and downs since then. But the plunge in the last year means that today Virginia has even fewer jobs in mid-wage occupations than during the depths of the recession.

Meanwhile, the number of jobs with median wages below $15.33 an hour grew by 26,100 when comparing May 2013 and 2014. This involves work like retail sales, grounds maintenance, and record clerks. On average, such jobs pay just $12.45 an hour. That’s under $25,000 a year for a full-time, year-round worker.

At the top, Virginia is seeing continued growth in occupations that typically pay above $24 an hour: jobs like office supervisors, sales reps for services, nurses and doctors, and lawyers. These are great jobs to have, but it’s really hard get there directly from the bottom. You need those middle rungs to climb all the way up.

COMMUNITY
– The Public Welfare Foundation is hiring a Criminal Justice Program Officer. You can check out the position description here, and be sure to share!

United Way of the National Capital Area‘s Do More 24 is just two days away! Do More 24, which takes place on June 4, is a local movement that brings together nonprofit organizations, companies, and people committed to making a difference through a day of focused, online giving.

EDUCATION | For the Poor, the Graduation Gap Is Even Wider Than The Enrollment Gap (NYT, 6/2)

POVERTY | According to a newly released study by the Federal Reserve Board on the economic well being of American households, in 2014, 47 percent of survey respondents indicated that they would not be able to cover an emergency expense totaling $400 – or that they would need to borrow or sell something in order to take care of it. Additionally, a study by the Urban Institute found that more families are relying on alternative financial services (like predatory loans). (City Lab, 5/29)

IMMIGRATION | The secret to being rich is surprisingly simple (WaPo, 6/1)


Take a look at where the nation’s unclaimed baggage goes to live out the rest of its days. Looks like a cool place to go!

– Ciara

Erratic work schedules often impact women most

WORKFORCE
A new study from the Center for Popular Democracy finds that women tend to be hit the hardest by the unstable hours and wages that are often a part of hourly work (City Lab, 5/20):

They are more likely to work jobs that pay on an hourly basis, according to the report, at 61 percent compared to 56 percent of men. In particular, women of color dominate the hourly workforce: They are twice as likely to work in an hourly job as in a salaried one, while white women are 1.4 times more likely.

Working part-time (less than 34 hours per week) further exacerbates the domino effects of irregular scheduling. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, in 2010, 26.6 percent of women worked part time, compared to just 13.4 percent of men. About half of all women who work hourly part-time jobs do so because of childcare issues, family obligations, or their own educational commitments.

[…]

Such work/life volatility amounts to tremendous stress, which in turn can impact a worker’s ability to sleep, and her overall health—plus, that of her children.

Opinion: The ‘low-wage recovery’ is a myth (WaPo, 5/20)

EVENTS | The England Family Foundation is hosting a donor briefing on the 11th Street Bridge Park on May 28th at the Anacostia Arts Center from 9:30 AM – 11:15 AM, followed by a walking tour of the site. This briefing is for donors only, but is not exclusively for WRAG members. Please contact Julia Baer-Cooper for details and to RSVP.

YOUTH/SOCIAL JUSTICE | The Public Welfare Foundation shares some takeaways from a recent sit-down with two experts who are working to tackle disparities in youth and adult incarceration in innovative ways. (Public Welfare Foundation, 5/19)

DISTRICT | Poll: D.C. residents favor mayor’s sales tax increase (WaPo, 5/21)

TRANSIT | Cities Need Great Transit All Day, Not Just For Rush-Hour (City Lab, 5/20)


In this battle of man vs. machine, a reporter faces off against an automated program to craft a news story. Who do you think won?

– Ciara

Introducing the BUILD Health Challenge

Your regular Daily WRAG edition today, as we have lots of great news to share.

HEALTH | This week, the Advisory Board Company, de Beaumont Foundation, Kresge Foundation, and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced the launch of the BUILD (Bold, Upstream, Integrated, Local, and Data-Driven) Health Challenge, a collaboration to improve community health and promote health equity across the country. (CBS, 11/12)

The BUILD  Health Challenge is designed to encourage communities to build meaningful partnerships among hospitals and health systems, community-based organizations, their local health department, and other organizations to improve the overall health of local residents.

The Advisory Board Company, the de Beaumont Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation are collaboratively issuing a call to action and inviting communities to take part in this nationwide effort. These four partners hope to identify, accelerate, and spotlight best practice models and innovative approaches that reorient the field toward upstream factors that influence health.

COMMUNITY | Mary McClymont, president of the Public Welfare Foundation and WRAG Board Member, received the Justice Through Philanthropy Award on behalf of the Foundation this week by the National Legal Aid & Defender Association. Congratulations! (Public Welfare Foundation, 11/13)

The Foundation was recognized for its special initiative to increase access to civil legal aid for the poor as well as its ongoing efforts to strengthen the ability of low-wage workers to promote policy and systems reform and its work to achieve reforms in the criminal and juvenile justice systems.

WRAG | This week, we celebrated WRAG president, Tamara Copeland, for being named one of Washington Business Journal’s 2014 Women Who Mean Business. You can take a look at her interview and read more about the well-deserved honor. WRAG members Capital One, Kaiser Permanente and MedImmune were sponsors of the awards ceremony that took place Thursday evening.

PHILANTHROPY
– With the IRS now accepting a more streamlined version of the application for 501(c)(3) status, known as Form 1023-EZ, there are a few things for funders to consider. Exponent Philanthropy has you covered. (Philanthrofiles, 11/12)

– In a study by Foundation Source,  it was found that small and mid-size foundations have recovered steadily since the recession. From 2008 to 2013, assets grew by 48 percent. (Chronicle. 11/14)

FOOD/NONPROFITS | Fare & Square, the first nonprofit grocery store in the United States (NFF, 11/12)


NEXT WEEK AT WRAG
It’s almost Annual Meeting time!

Annual Meeting VIP Reception (WRAG member CEO’s, trustees, and senior staff)
Wednesday, November 19, 2014  5:30 PM to 7:30 PM

2014 Annual Meeting: Setting a Bigger Table (WRAG members)
Thursday, November 20, 2014  9:00 AM to 2:00 PM


If you’re a bad dancer, it’s not your fault! It may actually be a diagnosable condition.

– Ciara