Tag: prince george’s county

Homelessness survey in the District points to need for regional cooperation

HOMELESSNESS | A new survey released this week shows that one-third of people currently experiencing homelessness in DC used to have homes in Maryland, Virginia or another state. (WAMU, 6/12)

The question of where DC’s homeless come from isn’t new — and it is often politically fraught. The survey won’t be used to try and limit homeless services to DC residents, according to Kristy Greenwalt, the director of the Interagency Council on Homelessness … she hopes it will spur better regional coordination on tackling homelessness which has been a topic of conversation among local leaders for some time … “We just wanted to learn a little more about people’s experience and what’s driving their decision-making. Were they originally from the District and lost housing and left and are returning to a support network? Are they from somewhere else and are coming here because they couldn’t get help in their jurisdiction?” Greenwalt says.

HOUSING
–  Why’s everyone talking about upzoning? It’s the foundation of green, equitable cities. (GGWash, 6/11)

– DC’s affordable housing is extremely inequitably distributed across the city, according to this image from the DC Office of Planning. (GGWash, 6/5)

FOOD | In Farm-to-Table 2.0, Local Farmers Are Partners Not Purveyors (CP, 6/12)

ENVIRONMENT | The Anacostia River suffered after the region’s wettest year on record, which has brought trash, waste and dirt that is harming the river. (WAMU, 6/11)

HEALTH | Absence Of ‘Harris Rider’ Could Put D.C. One Step Closer To Recreational Marijuana Dispensaries (WAMU, 6/12)

EDUCATION | DC Charter School Leaders Campaign For More Space (WAMU, 6/12)

ART/CULTURE | The Smithsonian Institution has picked a 10-story building by the L’Enfant Plaza Metro in Southwest DC for its new headquarters, which sets the stage for the institution’s larger planned South Mall campus renovation. (WBJ, 6/11)

PHILANTHROPY
The Rise, Fall, and Possible Rebirth of 100 Resilient Cities (CityLab, 6/12)

– Assets at Small Foundations Declined 3.5% Last Year, Study Shows (Chronicle, 6/12)

ANNOUNCEMENT | WRAG is excited to introduce our newest team member, Carmen Rodriguez, Director of Communication, Technology, and Administration! With Carmen on board, I am closing out my time as WRAG’s communications consultant responsible for producing the (Almost) Daily WRAG. It has been a true pleasure bringing you the (Almost) Daily over the past six months as WRAG builds its new team.

This summer, the Daily will go on “vacation” as WRAG assesses its communications strategy and needs going forward. We will continue to bring you occasional updates using this platform, but we will not produce a regular news roundup. In the meantime, we would love to hear from readers: What have you valued about the Daily WRAG? What would you like to see more of from WRAG? Less of? We welcome your thoughts via this quick survey.

We look forward to sharing with you our new communications strategy later this year!


Social Sector Job Openings 

Institutional Development Manager | Martha’s Table – New!
Director | Open Society Institute-Baltimore
Director, School Partnerships Coach | Flamboyan Foundation
Senior Director of Development, Research & Innovation | Children’s Hospital Foundation
Senior Program Manager | Rising Tide Foundation
Development Manager | Mikva Challenge DC
Foundation Director | Venable LLP
Development Associate | Sitar Arts Center
Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


An app to find the best happy hour in DC? Yes, please – cheers to a great summer!

– Buffy

Better data in Prince George’s County benefits communities

PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY | This week, the Prince George’s County government relaunched a website that allowed the public to browse information from the different agencies including 311 and crime statistics. The County’s emphasis on collecting and relaying data for the public has already benefited communities that have specific needs and helped agencies run more efficiently. (WaPo, 3/6)

For example, by tracking requests for code enforcement, the government realized that demand was higher in poorer, more densely populated neighborhoods inside the Beltway, and redeployed inspectors who had been spread evenly throughout the county.

A CountyStat team mapped data from domestic violence calls and showed that a large number of calls were coming from the southern part of Prince George’s. But the services that help families affected by domestic violence were located primarily in the northern portion of the county.

The analysis convinced the government to give higher priority for grants to organizations and nonprofits willing to serve those southern communities.

PUBLIC SAFETY | Opinion: Guns are an easy target, but the real crime of despair and neglect is harder to fix (WaPo, 3/7)

ENVIRONMENT | How climate change will affect the Greater Washington region and how soon we can expect to see the changes. (Washingtonian, 3/7)

HUMAN RIGHTS/ANTISEMITISM |  Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett is asking the county council to help pay for security upgrades for two of the Jewish community centers targeted by bomb threats recently. The county council president would also like to look at other religious facilities that may be targeted. (Bethesda Beat, 3/6)

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT | In a newly released D.C. Economic Strategy Report, the District’s mayor has two goals: grow the city’s private sector economy by 20 percent by the end of 2021 and create more jobs and lower unemployment levels below 10 percent in all wards. (WBJ, 3/7)

WORKFORCE
– DC’s Aspire to Entrepreneurship program helped a disabled returning citizen start a transportation business. (WUSA9, 3/5)

– Here’s how immigrants contribute to Virginia and Maryland’s workforce (GGW, 3/7)

EDUCATION | DC Council and Mayor Muriel Bowser are in disagreement about the renewal of a federally funded  DC school voucher program. (WaPo, 3/7)


The Washington Post’s Peeps’ diorama challenge is gone. Check out the favorites from last year.

– Kendra

Affordable housing investments in D.C. assist thousands

HOUSING
– Mayor Muriel Bowser’s administration is highlighting recent affordable housing investments designed to assist thousands of D.C. residents who can soon rent from over 1,200 apartments. (City Paper, 10/7)

At a groundbreaking ceremony for the future mixed-use Beacon Center development, at 6300 Georgia Ave. NW, Bowser highlighted 19 affordable-housing projects her team has shepherded since she took office last year. They amount to just over $106 million designated from D.C.’s Housing Production Trust Fund, a major tool for bankrolling such housing. So far, Bowser has put $100 million annually in the fund.

In a statement, the mayor called her budgetary commitments for affordable housing unprecedented. “Because of our efforts, real money is getting out the door,” she said in remarks echoed by her Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development Brian Kenner and Department of Housing and Community Development Director Polly Donaldson, who described the investments as “historic.”

– Montgomery County is facing a challenge over affordable housing plans in Silver Spring. (GGW, 10/5)

RACIAL EQUITY
– In a special guest post, Terri Lee Freeman, former head of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region and WRAG board chair, writes about why, from her current vantage point as the president of the National Civil Rights Museum, she believes it is critically necessary for funders to do the difficult work of confronting institutional racism. (Daily, 10/11)

–  Race, School Ratings And Real Estate: A ‘Legal Gray Area’ (NPR, 10/10)

EDUCATION
Kaiser Permanente of the Mid-Atlantic States has committed $1 million to help Venture Philanthropy Partners expand career-and college-readiness programs through the new Ready for Work: Champions for Career and College Ready Graduates of Prince George’s County initiative.

 – After Maryland Governor Larry Hogan mandated that school begin after Labor Day, the Montgomery County Board of Education has voted to start classes before the holiday weekend. (WTOP, 10/10)

DISTRICT
 There are alarming reports of significant patient abuse at St. Elizabeths Hospital, the city-run institution for the mentally ill in D.C. (City Paper, 10/7)

– In the latest turmoil, Warden William Smith resigned from the D.C. Department of Corrections. (City Paper, 10/11)

PHILANTHROPY | The Meyer Foundation received the Historical Society of Washington, D.C.’s  Making D.C. History Award for Distinction in Local Philanthropy at the Making D.C. History Awards on Friday, October 7, 2016.


Ever want to live in the White House? Here’s your chance – Buffy

New data show how life expectancy varies across the region

HEALTH/EQUITY | The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Virginia Commonwealth University’s Center on Society and Health have released a new map showing wide variations in life expectancy for babies born in different areas of the Greater Washington region. The map shows that opportunities to be as healthy as possible vary by neighborhood.

The aim of these maps is to serve as a resource—raising awareness of factors that shape health and spurring discussion and action on a complex web of factors that influence health. In this case, the average life expectancy in the District of Columbia and Prince George’s County is 78 years – 8 years shorter than for babies born in either Arlington or Fairfax Counties.

Related: Next month, Dr. Steven Woolf, head of the Center on Society and Health at VCU, will present as part of WRAG’s 2016 Brightest Minds series. Join us to learn more about the social and economic factors that influence health and contribute to wide disparities in life expectancy across our region. This event is open to the public. Find out more and register here.

COMMUNITY | The University of Maryland has announced a $75 million initiative to support student philanthropy work called the “Do Good Institute”, which will build on the work of formerly named UMD’s Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership and be run through the public policy school.  The goal of this new effort is to establish the University of Maryland as a global leader in advancing social change, philanthropy and nonprofit leadership. (WaPo, 9/22) UMD’s Do Good Institute is WRAG’s long-time partner on the Philanthropy Fellows program, through which over 50 students have gained experience in philanthropy and learned about the region at over 30 WRAG member organizations.

Related: WRAG is excited to welcome the 2016-2017 Philanthropy Fellows! Six students from the University of Maryland’s Do Good Institute are working with five WRAG members this year, on a variety of projects from grants administration and communications, to development and public policy initiatives. (Daily, 9/26)

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS
– DC has finalized the second annual youth homeless census, a nine-day push to count residents under 25 who don’t have permanent housing. (City Paper, 9/23)

 – D.C. Kicks Off $13 Million Affordable Housing Renovation in Ward 4 (City Paper, 9/23)

EDUCATION | As kindergarten ratchets up academics, parents feel the stress (WaPo, 9/25)

PHILANTHROPYPutting Data About Nonprofits to Work for Good (Chronicle, 9/23)


As we gear up for the first Presidential Debate tonight, it’s worth noting that Americans are quick to ask if candidates are giving enough, but they don’t follow up on how the money is being used – Buffy

 

Prince George’s County Head Start Loses Millions in Grant Funding

EDUCATION 

The Department of Health and Human Services released a scathing report detailing Head Start deficiencies in the Prince George’s County school system, which resulted in the loss of a $6.3 million grant. The report cites abuse, poor teacher training, and a failure to correct past problems.The Head Start program is an early childhood program largely funded with federal dollars. (WaPo, 8/17)

Prince George’s school leaders are trying to determine how to keep the county’s Head Start program funded. The federal Administration for Children and Families released a statement Wednesday saying that the federal government “is committed to continuing Head Start services in Prince George’s County and to minimize any disruption to children and families.”

Related: After Funding Cut, What’s Next for Prince George’s Co. Head Start? (WTOP, 8/17)

– The Nation’s Teacher Force Lacks Diversity, and it Might Not Get Much Better. Minority students across the country would benefit from having more minority teachers studies show, but recruitment is a critical challenge for the future. (WaPo, 8/18)

– District Residents Have The Most Student Debt In The US. (WAMU, 8/15)

REGIONAL | A human-trafficking ring that operated for years and spanned from Northern Virginia to Baltimore has been shut down. (WaPo, 8/15)

FOOD/ART | How To Cultivate Plants Using Just Water, Nutrients And A Steady Diet Of DC Punk (WAMU, 8/12)

NONPROFITS | Communicating effectively about the real costs of running a nonprofit is imperative in order to engage and sustain donors and investors.  This post highlights how nonprofits can use new imagery to help educate about the sector. (NP Quarterly, 8/16)

PHILANTHROPY
 Women are Increasingly Powerful Philanthropists. But How Can They be Most Effective?  (Huff Po, 8/12) 

-Foundations and endowments are limiting the use of hedge fund investments in their portfolios according to a survey of nonprofit investors. (Bloomberg, 8/15)


At the end of one of the hottest weeks of the year, this isn’t looking so bad : ) … 2017 Farmers’ Almanac predicts a particularly cold, wet winter  for D.C., Maryland and Virginia – Buffy

 

Plans for Prince George’s Regional Medical Center may be scaled back

HEALTH
Amid concerns that the upcoming Prince George’s County Regional Medical Center project may be too large, regulators in Maryland are calling for some cutbacks. The center, originally expected to open in 2017, may open in 2020. (WBJ, 5/24)

[The] planned partnership for a new 231-bed teaching hospital at Largo Town Center is part of a larger redevelopment plan that county leaders say will transform health care for residents and revitalize nearby business. The hospital would replace Dimensions’ [Healthcare System’s] long-struggling flagship hospital, Prince George’s Hospital Center in Cheverly.

– In this interview, Chief Scientific Officer Diane Bovenkamp, Ph.D., of the BrightFocus Foundation discusses the science and therapeutic research they are funding to address Alzheimer’s disease. (Real World Health Care, 5/25)

– According to a new report from the United Health Foundation, comparing the current health status of those ages 50-64 with those of the same age in 1999, this next generation of senior citizens is expected to have more health concerns. The research has potentially serious implications on future health care costs for individuals and taxpayers overall. (NPR, 5/25)

PHILANTHROPY | In the latest installment of Exponent Philanthropy‘s Philanthropy Lessons video series, funders  discuss how philanthropy must bring value beyond dollars. (EP, May 2016)

LGBT/HOMELESSNESS | DC Shelters frustrated by lack of funding for LGBT homeless youth (Metro Weekly, 5/23)

EDUCATION/DISTRICT | A new analysis by the Urban Institute examines improvements in test scores by District students. Despite the gains, significant achievement gaps remain among D.C. students. (WCP, 5/24)

Related: Education funders are invited to the next session in WRAG’s 2016 public education speaker series, focused on the role of background knowledge in literacy. More details here.

DISTRICT/ECONOMY | Fans of interactive, at-a-glance data, rejoice! The DC Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning & Economic Development has released a new Ward Indicators Tool as part of their  Economic Intelligence Dashboard, to provide a source for finding demographic and investment data by ward. (Technical.ly, 5/23)


I don’t know about you, but I have officially run out of excuses for not wanting to go to the gym.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – April 18 through April 22, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG
 In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland discussed the progression of the Putting Racism on the Table series and how it’s about more than just learning. (Daily,4/21)

– Jessica Finkel, Philanthropy Fellow at Kaiser Permanente, shared how her experience working with the organization’s Community Benefit department helped her discover a passion for policy and public health. (Daily, 3/20)

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
Consumer Health Foundation president and WRAG board member Yanique Redwood discussed how marijuana-related incarcerations have devastated communities of color for years, citing points from WRAG’s recent Putting Racism on the Table session on mass incarceration, featuring speaker James Bell, J.D. of the W. Haywood Burns Institute. (CHF, 4/20)

Inter-American Development Bank launched a newly-revamped Improving Lives grants program, open to nonprofit organizations serving low-income Latin American and Caribbean communities in the Washington metropolitan area. The program will combine five grants of up to $50,000 each with skills-based volunteering, and is aimed at promoting innovative projects involving community and economic development, health and well-being, education or the arts. Eligible organizations in the region may apply for grants by submitting proposals before 6 pm (EST) May 19, 2016. For more information, please read the requirements or write to idbcommunityrelations@iadb.org.

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION/ECONOMY
– Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker spoke on his vision for making the jurisdiction a high-demand area for business in his recent State of the Economy address. (WBJ, 4/13)

– While Arlington County’s population continues to grow, the number of jobs continues to decline, according to recent data. (ARLnow, 4/20)

THIS WEEK IN THE WORKFORCE
Here are three key tools organizations in the social sector can use to build more diverse workplaces and address persistent institutional biases. (SSIR, 4/14)

 Lack of Training for Young Nonprofit Workers Means Too Few Potential Leaders (Chronicle, 4/19) Subscription required


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


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Can you remember these viral dance moves from the past ten years?

– Ciara

Veterans often faced with long waits for health care

VETERANS/HEALTH 
A new audit by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) reveals that veterans enrolling in health care from the Department of Veterans Affairs are typically faced with months-long waits before ever being able to see a medical provider. Wait-time manipulation and scheduling errors were found to be significant factors in causing such delays. (WaPo, 4/19)

The average waiting time — as measured from the time veterans requested that VA contact them to schedule appointments to when they were seen — at the six medical centers GAO studied ranged from 22 to 71 days. Of the 180 veterans GAO tracked, 60 still hadn’t been seen by the time the auditors ended their review last month, in several cases because VA never followed up on their requests to be contacted or because of other administrative errors.

FOOD/ENVIRONMENT | Op-ed: Celeste James of Kaiser Permanente and Ryan Strode of Arabella Advisors discuss the importance of building a “Good Food” system that uses sustainable farming practices and protects the Chesapeake Bay by avoiding large-scale industrial agriculture and over-fishing in the area. (Baltimore Sun, 4/13)

COMMUNITY | Inter-American Development Bank has launched a newly revamped Improving Lives grants program, open to nonprofit organizations serving low-income Latin American and Caribbean communities in the Washington metropolitan area. The program will combine five grants of up to $50,000 each with skills-based volunteering, and is aimed at promoting innovative projects involving community and economic development, health and well-being, education or the arts. Eligible organizations in the region may apply for grants by submitting proposals before 6 pm (EST) May 19, 2016. For more information, please read the requirements or write to idbcommunityrelations@iadb.org.

MARYLAND/ECONOMY | In a recent State of the Economy address, Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker spoke on his vision for making the jurisdiction a high-demand area for business. (WBJ, 4/13)

WORKFORCE/RACE
– How can organizations in the social sector work to build more diverse workplaces and address persistent institutional biases? Here are three key tools that may lead to success. (SSIR, 4/14)

– Feds urged to fight ‘unconscious bias’ in hiring and promotions (WaPo, 4/14)

TRANSIT | Bikeshare services, convenient and healthy, have long been a great option for those who can afford their annual memberships. Now, one service is expanding its reach to lower-income District residents by implementing need-based annual membership fees. (DCist, 4/13)

JOBS
Washington AIDS Partnership, an initiative of WRAG that invests more than $1 million annually in local organizations to improve HIV/AIDS and health-related services, seeks a program associate.

– All Ages Read Together seeks an executive director.


New Majority Labs, an organization dedicated to empowering communities of color to identify and build solutions to their own challenges using data and community engagement tools, recently tasked seven black youth from the District’s Ivy City neighborhood with conducting a survey of their neighbors, then used their findings to develop a hip hop song about the evolving community.

– Ciara

Protecting the future of arts spaces

ARTS 
Washington City Paper examines the controversial conversion of 411 New York Ave NE, the home of Union Arts and a long-time DIY arts venue in D.C. that provides affordable space for organizations, visual artists, and underground musicians, into a luxury hotel that, as currently planned, will have a limited supply of studio space available to artists. The organized pushback against the development highlights the severe shortage of affordable space for artists and musicians to live, practice, perform, and work in D.C. (and elsewhere in the region) – and the irony that robust arts and culture scenes contribute to the rising real estate values that push artists out (WCP, 4/1):

[The] hotel project might fit into Mayor Muriel Bowser’s stated goal of “support[ing] and expand[ing] the District’s creative economy,” but for many of the artist tenants of 411 New York Ave. NE and members of the broader arts community, it dissolves a cherished, vibrant, and important arts space. To them, it’s cultural displacement.

To them, this isn’t a struggle to save a building, but a fight to save the future of D.C.’s underground arts communities.

When few question the value of the creative economy to the overall vibrancy of our region, this situation raises important questions about how government, businesses and developers, artists, and funders can preserve and create spaces for artists.

COMMUNICATIONS | On the heels of Twitter’s recent 10th birthday, I ask the question, “What’s the fuss about Twitter?” and explain why you (or the leader of your organization) should start tweeting now. (Daily 4/4)

HOUSING | In their Matters@Hand thought leadership series sponsored by Enterprise Community Partners, HAND explores the realities of mixed-income housing in the region and the benefits these strategies have actually had for the area’s low-income residents. (Helping Hands Blog, 4/1)

REGION/WORKFORCE | As National Harbor in Prince George’s County continues to grow into an employment core and regional destination, a transit line linking the hub to Alexandria remains absent. The adjacent communities have yet to compromise on a specific route or funding for a transit project, further underscoring the need for regional cooperation in order to avoid hindering the economic potential of the area and service workers’ ability to commute. (WaPo, 4/1)

COMMUNITY 
– The CareFirst open grant application deadline for 2016 is June 13 at 11:59 PM. 501(c)(3) organizations can submit their online applications in support of health-related services or innovative programs. Find out more here.

– The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments is one of 10 organizations from across the U.S. selected administer a three-year USDA initiative called FoodLINC (Leveraging Investment for Network Coordination) to strengthen the region’s local food business sector, while expanding consumer access to healthy, local food. Agua Fund and Prince Charitable Trusts are philanthropic partners. Read more here.

EQUITY | Lately, due to a number of incidents in the news, many voices are calling for more police officers to be required to wear body cameras. But even with camera footage, there is often debate as to what the videos actually portray. The New York Times presents an exercise in a phenomenon known as “camera perspective bias.” (NYT, 4/1)

PHILANTHROPY | Opinion: Now or Forever: Rethinking Foundation Life Spans (Chronicle, 3/30)

JOBS | Arabella Advisors seeks a qualified candidate for the position of Associate Director, Consulting Services for their Good Food team.


Are you ready for some baseball? Test your knowledge of the sport with this quiz.

– Ciara

Rising poverty rates in Virginia schools bring challenges

VIRGINIA/POVERTY/EDUCATION
Over the past several years, some Northern Virginia schools have seen a stark increase in the number of students who live in poverty. Particularly in Fairfax County, school administrators continue to try to meet the growing needs of students amid budget constraints. (WAMU, 3/1)

In the last decade, school administrators across Northern Virginia noticed a marked increased in the number of students who live in poverty. Nowhere was the trend more pitched than Manassas, where the percentage of students living in poverty increased from 24 to nearly 58 percent in the last 10 years.

RELATED: Yesterday, we shared some of the important points made by Dr. Matthew Biel, Director of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Georgetown University Medical Center, at the first session of WRAG’s 2016 Public Education Speaker Series where he spoke on the impact of toxic stress on children’s development stemming from a number of issues like housing instability and food insecurity. (Daily 2/29)

PHILANTHROPY
– The Hill-Snowdon Foundation has launched a new website for their Making Black Lives Matter Initiative (MBLM). The site will provide background on the MBLM Initiative, focused on “supporting black-led organizing in order to help revitalize and strengthen the institutional and political power of the black community.” The website also introduces the Black Social Change Funders Network  a network to help foundations and donors accelerate their interest in supporting black-led social change – in partnership with the Association of Black Foundation Executives.

Venture Philanthropy Partners, in association with Prince George’s County administration, public schools, local business leaders, philanthropy, and social profit organizations, recently launched the Ready for Work initiative, aimed at providing students with real work experiences prior to graduation from high school. (VPP, 2/2016)

– The Executives’ Alliance for Boys & Men of Color have announced a ‘Ban the Box Philanthropy Challenge,’ calling for U.S. philanthropic institutions to adopt fair chance hiring policies. Participating and supporting organizations include: Butler Family Fund, Consumer Health Foundation, Council on FoundationsOpen Society Foundations, and Public Welfare Foundation.

– Funders for LGBTQ Issues has released their 2014 Tracking Report, analyzing 4,552 grants from 313 foundations funding LGBTQ issues within that calendar year. You can view the comprehensive assessment and its accompanying infographic here. (Funders for LGBTQ Issues, 2/25)

IMMIGRATION/YOUTH/REGION | Remaking High School for Immigrant Kids (City Lab, 2/29)

CSR | In his latest blog post, Tim McClimon, president of the American Express Foundation and head faculty member for the Institute for CSR, examines the challenges facing many CSR professionals today in keeping millennial leaders engaged. (American Express, 2/29)

ARTS | The Theatre Communications Group is taking nominations for D.C. area early-career leaders of color in social-profit theater to participate in their Rising Leaders of Color program, designed to “change the face of the theatre field by nurturing and supporting an inter-generational network of leaders of color at various stages in their careers.”


Check out this trailer for what is probably the only right way to do a film about the life of Vincent Van Gogh. 

– Ciara