Tag: Montgomery County

Homelessness survey in the District points to need for regional cooperation

HOMELESSNESS | A new survey released this week shows that one-third of people currently experiencing homelessness in DC used to have homes in Maryland, Virginia or another state. (WAMU, 6/12)

The question of where DC’s homeless come from isn’t new — and it is often politically fraught. The survey won’t be used to try and limit homeless services to DC residents, according to Kristy Greenwalt, the director of the Interagency Council on Homelessness … she hopes it will spur better regional coordination on tackling homelessness which has been a topic of conversation among local leaders for some time … “We just wanted to learn a little more about people’s experience and what’s driving their decision-making. Were they originally from the District and lost housing and left and are returning to a support network? Are they from somewhere else and are coming here because they couldn’t get help in their jurisdiction?” Greenwalt says.

HOUSING
–  Why’s everyone talking about upzoning? It’s the foundation of green, equitable cities. (GGWash, 6/11)

– DC’s affordable housing is extremely inequitably distributed across the city, according to this image from the DC Office of Planning. (GGWash, 6/5)

FOOD | In Farm-to-Table 2.0, Local Farmers Are Partners Not Purveyors (CP, 6/12)

ENVIRONMENT | The Anacostia River suffered after the region’s wettest year on record, which has brought trash, waste and dirt that is harming the river. (WAMU, 6/11)

HEALTH | Absence Of ‘Harris Rider’ Could Put D.C. One Step Closer To Recreational Marijuana Dispensaries (WAMU, 6/12)

EDUCATION | DC Charter School Leaders Campaign For More Space (WAMU, 6/12)

ART/CULTURE | The Smithsonian Institution has picked a 10-story building by the L’Enfant Plaza Metro in Southwest DC for its new headquarters, which sets the stage for the institution’s larger planned South Mall campus renovation. (WBJ, 6/11)

PHILANTHROPY
The Rise, Fall, and Possible Rebirth of 100 Resilient Cities (CityLab, 6/12)

– Assets at Small Foundations Declined 3.5% Last Year, Study Shows (Chronicle, 6/12)

ANNOUNCEMENT | WRAG is excited to introduce our newest team member, Carmen Rodriguez, Director of Communication, Technology, and Administration! With Carmen on board, I am closing out my time as WRAG’s communications consultant responsible for producing the (Almost) Daily WRAG. It has been a true pleasure bringing you the (Almost) Daily over the past six months as WRAG builds its new team.

This summer, the Daily will go on “vacation” as WRAG assesses its communications strategy and needs going forward. We will continue to bring you occasional updates using this platform, but we will not produce a regular news roundup. In the meantime, we would love to hear from readers: What have you valued about the Daily WRAG? What would you like to see more of from WRAG? Less of? We welcome your thoughts via this quick survey.

We look forward to sharing with you our new communications strategy later this year!


Social Sector Job Openings 

Institutional Development Manager | Martha’s Table – New!
Director | Open Society Institute-Baltimore
Director, School Partnerships Coach | Flamboyan Foundation
Senior Director of Development, Research & Innovation | Children’s Hospital Foundation
Senior Program Manager | Rising Tide Foundation
Development Manager | Mikva Challenge DC
Foundation Director | Venable LLP
Development Associate | Sitar Arts Center
Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


An app to find the best happy hour in DC? Yes, please – cheers to a great summer!

– Buffy

The connection between high asthma rates and poor housing conditions in the District

HOUSING
– According to Dr. Ankoor Shah, medical director of the Children’s National Medical Center, the District has an “epidemic” child asthma problem that is exacerbated by poor housing conditions and disproportionately affects low-income children of color, specifically in Wards 7 and 8. (CP, 5/22)

Shah rattles off the statistics: Fourteen percent of children in DC have asthma, and Children’s National takes the bulk of those cases … and emergency room data show that children who live in Ward 8 have 20 to 25 times the number of ER visits, total, as their counterparts who live in more affluent Northwest neighborhoods … same with hospitalization rates for asthma, which are 10 times higher for Ward 8 kids … and exacerbating, if not directly contributing, to these asthma cases are poor housing conditions, Shah says.

– Bowser and DC Council offer competing visions on affordable-housing crisis (WaPo, 5/22)

ENVIRONMENT | New law will require half of Maryland power to come from renewable sources by 2030 (WaPo, 5/22)

EDUCATION | Many School Districts Hesitate To Say Students Have Dyslexia. That Can Lead To Problems (WAMU, 5/20)

TRANSIT
– An upcoming 15-week Metro shutdown of six stations in Virginia will affect an estimated 17,000 travelers daily. (WaPo, 5/22)

– E-Bikes And Scooters Will Be Allowed On Some Montgomery County Trails (WAMU, 5/20)

DISTRICT | DC parks are the best in the country according to this year’s ParkScore, the Trust for Public Land’s annual ranking of urban parks and recreation opportunities in the 100 largest cities in the country. (dcist, 5/22)

MONTGOMERY COUNTY | Downtown Silver Spring to get $10 million face-lift (WTOP, 5/22)

PHILANTHROPY | Billionaire Robert Smith, who pledged to wipe out the student debt of nearly 400 Morehouse College graduates this week, also plans to help African-American students get involved in internX, where STEM students can connect with companies looking to ensure their interns are drawn from a diverse pool of students. (Chronicle, 5/2)


This 80’s girl is excited – after 40 years the Stray Cats are ready for a comeback.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

The government shutdown cost the local economy $1.6 billion

SHUTDOWN 
– The government shutdown cost the DC region more than $1.6 billion in lost economic output, according to George Mason University economist Stephen Fuller – and it may have damaged the region’s image as well. (WaPo, 1/26)

Civic leaders, business owners and other analysts believe the closing of federal agencies has harmed the government’s reputation as a reliable business partner and employer, and it has affected the morale of local federal workers and contractors who went unpaid. Additionally, there is concern that companies and employees will look for work in the private sector, and hurt investment in the region. “It should have been the best year of the decade,” Fuller said. “It’s going to struggle to fulfill its potential.”

– In her latest column, WRAG’s president Tamara Lucas Copeland recognizes the strain on nonprofit organizations that ramped up to meet the needs of furloughed workers and others affected by the shutdown – and that now have to continue providing critical safety net services, with diminished financial resources. For many of those organizations, the emergency isn’t over, even if the media moves on. (Daily, 1/28)

HOUSING
– A housing complex in DC was developed specifically for grandparents raising children, or “grandfamilies,” whose numbers have been growing in recent years. As of 2017, 2.8 million children were being raised by 2.6 million grandparents, including 7,250 kids in DC. (WaPo, 1/22)

Enterprise Community Partners will invest $250 million over five years to spur collaboration among health, housing, and community development sectors through the newly launched “Health Begins with Home” – a national initiative to harness the power of affordable homes to create healthier families and stronger communities. (Enterprise, 1/24)

EDUCATION
– Virginia educators are taking to the streets and marching to the state capitol today to protest a lack of money for public schools. (WaPo, 1/27)

– Johns Hopkins University plans to buy the Newseum building in DC, and will maintain the building’s uses for “education, discovery, [and] free and open debate.” (Curbed, 1/25)

CENSUS | Even if the citizenship question is not on the 2020 census, people still may be afraid to report their information. (CityLab, 1/22)

HEALTH | In an attempt to diversify the next generation of doctors and focus on the shortage of primary care physicians in underserved areas, free tuition is being offered to medical students at New York University. (NPQ, 1/25)

MONTGOMERY COUNTY | Here are seven ways Montgomery County is changing (GGW, 1/24)

PHILANTHROPY | How Philanthropy Can Get Serious About Racial Healing (Chronicle, 1/22)


“Food Halls” are having a moment, and there’s a new Latin American food hall and market – La Cosecha – coming to DC this summer.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

Disenfranchisement of immigrants is the focus of 2020 Census citizenship question trial

CENSUS | This week a trial began in Maryland that addresses two of seven lawsuits challenging the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 Census, which experts believe will produce a less accurate count. (WaPo, 1/25)

Opponents said the late addition of the question without the testing that new questions usually undergo would lead to undercounts among immigrant communities and affect federal funding, apportionment and redistricting. They noted that the bureau’s own analysis found that adding the question could jeopardize the accuracy of the survey … and the question would affect a broad swath of people — including U.S. citizens — living in areas such as Prince George’s County that have a high proportion of immigrants and minorities and are vulnerable to being undercounted.

Related: WRAG’s 2020 Census Working Group is focused on leveraging the resources of local philanthropy to ensure a fair, accurate, and complete census. At the January 31 meeting, we’ll get an update on the status of the citizenship question from the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights. WRAG members can register for this meeting here.

SHUTDOWN
Arabella Advisors recently co-hosted a briefing for donors, discussing the near and long-term impacts of the government shutdown on government workers and the most vulnerable in our society, and how philanthropy can help.

– DC is losing $12 million per week during the government shutdown, and stands to lose more than $85 million if it lasts to February 15 – the equivalent of most of the District’s $100 million annual budget for its Affordable Housing Trust Fund. (WAMU, 1/23)

– Black Federal Workers In Prince George’s County Speak Out (WAMU, 1/22)

EDUCATION | Is Lewis D. Ferebee the leader to close D.C.’s achievement gap? (WaPo, 1/25)

MONTGOMERY COUNTY
– Montgomery County planners say residents are far more diverse, have grown older, and have faced soaring home prices even as their incomes stagnated. (WaPo, 1/24)

– A new report from a nonprofit that advocates for transportation, education reform and economic development in Montgomery County urges a shift in spending priorities by the county. (Bethesda Magazine, 1/22)

CRIMINAL JUSTICE
– From prison law libraries to paralegal fellowships: DC program helps put returning citizens on path to success (DC Line, 1/23)

– Those involved in bail reform efforts and projects continue to grow, as the movement for reform strengthens. (NPQ, 1/22)

NONPROFITS | Independent Sector just released new research on tax provisions that will require nonprofits to pay a 21 percent tax on the cost of employee transportation benefits – money that will go to the federal government rather than community needs.

PHILANTHROPY | Grant Making Up, Household Giving Will Be Nearly Flat This Year, Projections Say (Chronicle, 1/23 – subscription)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Senior Communications Officer | Gill Foundation – New!
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health – New!
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects – New!
Foundation and Government Relations Officer | Shakespeare Theatre Company – New!
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation – New!
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Foundation and Government Relations Officer​ | ​Shakespeare Theatre Company
Grants & Communications Officer​ | ​The Crimsonbridge Foundation
Executive Director​ | ​VHC Medical Brigade
Director of Development​ | ​DC Bar Foundation
Program Manager​ | ​Weissberg Foundation
Senior Supervising Attorney, Criminal Justice Reform​ | ​Southern Poverty Law Center
Director of Development​ | ​The Barker Adoption Foundation
Grant Reviewer​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Executive Assistant​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Administrative Associate | United Philanthropy Forum
Executive Director | The Volgenau Foundation
President | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Program Associate for Strategy, Equity, and Research | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Interesting information on “charitable swag” – of which I have a lot.

Next week we’ll publish the (almost) Daily WRAG on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

– Buffy

Envisioning a Racially Equitable Montgomery County

By Hanh Le, Executive Director, Weissberg Foundation & Co-Chair, WRAG’s Racial Equity Working Group, and Jayne Park, Executive Director, IMPACT Silver Spring

Community Convo - Racial History of Montgomery Co 500

What would a racially equitable Montgomery County look like? On October 18, 2017 the Racial Equity Working Group of the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers (WRAG) partnered with IMPACT Silver Spring to explore this question. We brought together about 40 community members and local funders diverse in race, ethnicity, age, affiliations, and vocations to connect with one another, learn about the historical roots of today’s racial inequities, generate ideas for what is needed to advance racial equity, and envision how those advances might look in the county.

Many of us left the convening feeling connected, full, and hopeful, while also knowing the true test of success would be whether concrete actions would emerge and move the work forward. This written piece reflects on what happened at the community conversation and its significance, the state of current racial equity efforts, and what still needs to be done to advance the work.What would a racially equitable Montgomery County look like? On October 18, 2017 the Racial Equity Working Group of the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers (WRAG) partnered with IMPACT Silver Spring to explore this question. We brought together about 40 community members and local funders diverse in race, ethnicity, age, affiliations, and vocations to connect with one another, learn about the historical roots of today’s racial inequities, generate ideas for what is needed to advance racial equity, and envision how those advances might look in the county.

Click here to read the full report on our community conversation in Montgomery County.

Affordable housing investments in D.C. assist thousands

HOUSING
– Mayor Muriel Bowser’s administration is highlighting recent affordable housing investments designed to assist thousands of D.C. residents who can soon rent from over 1,200 apartments. (City Paper, 10/7)

At a groundbreaking ceremony for the future mixed-use Beacon Center development, at 6300 Georgia Ave. NW, Bowser highlighted 19 affordable-housing projects her team has shepherded since she took office last year. They amount to just over $106 million designated from D.C.’s Housing Production Trust Fund, a major tool for bankrolling such housing. So far, Bowser has put $100 million annually in the fund.

In a statement, the mayor called her budgetary commitments for affordable housing unprecedented. “Because of our efforts, real money is getting out the door,” she said in remarks echoed by her Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development Brian Kenner and Department of Housing and Community Development Director Polly Donaldson, who described the investments as “historic.”

– Montgomery County is facing a challenge over affordable housing plans in Silver Spring. (GGW, 10/5)

RACIAL EQUITY
– In a special guest post, Terri Lee Freeman, former head of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region and WRAG board chair, writes about why, from her current vantage point as the president of the National Civil Rights Museum, she believes it is critically necessary for funders to do the difficult work of confronting institutional racism. (Daily, 10/11)

–  Race, School Ratings And Real Estate: A ‘Legal Gray Area’ (NPR, 10/10)

EDUCATION
Kaiser Permanente of the Mid-Atlantic States has committed $1 million to help Venture Philanthropy Partners expand career-and college-readiness programs through the new Ready for Work: Champions for Career and College Ready Graduates of Prince George’s County initiative.

 – After Maryland Governor Larry Hogan mandated that school begin after Labor Day, the Montgomery County Board of Education has voted to start classes before the holiday weekend. (WTOP, 10/10)

DISTRICT
 There are alarming reports of significant patient abuse at St. Elizabeths Hospital, the city-run institution for the mentally ill in D.C. (City Paper, 10/7)

– In the latest turmoil, Warden William Smith resigned from the D.C. Department of Corrections. (City Paper, 10/11)

PHILANTHROPY | The Meyer Foundation received the Historical Society of Washington, D.C.’s  Making D.C. History Award for Distinction in Local Philanthropy at the Making D.C. History Awards on Friday, October 7, 2016.


Ever want to live in the White House? Here’s your chance – Buffy

Where you live in DC determines the availability of medical care

HEALTH 
– Where people live in D.C. affects their access to non-emergency medical care. In addition to emergency vehicles taking longer to get east of the Anacostia River, fewer clinics, pharmacies, and vaccination centers means access to non-emergency medical care is more difficult there as well. (GGW, 10/4)

No urgent care or retail clinics have opened in Wards 4 or 8 since 2010, and nearly 70% of all D.C.’s clinics are in Wards 2 and 3. This gap is partially filled by community health centers. Community health centers receive federal funding to provide primary care to underserved populations. One such clinic, Unity Health Care, operates a community health centers in all wards except 2, 3, and 4, with varying degrees of walk-in services.

– ‘An act of kindness’: Medical aid-in-dying legislation advances in the District (WaPo, 10/6)

TRANSPORTATIONMontgomery’s new bus rapid transit system will make the county more equitable (GGW, 10/5)

EDUCATION
– Study finds 10 percent of Virginia schoolchildren are chronically absent (WaPo, 10/5)

– Although it hasn’t been discussed much on the campaign trail, education is on the minds of the electorate. (Atlantic, 10/1)

LGBT | For D.C.’s LGBT Community, A Police Liaison Who Can Relate (WAMU, 10/6)

NONPROFITS Corporate America Emerging Source for Nonprofit CFOs (NPQ, 10/5)

ENVIRONMENT | The James River in Virginia at Jamestown, where America’s first permanent English settlement was founded in 1607, was just cited as being among America’s “most endangered” historic places by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. (WTOP, 10/5)

MARYLAND | Two months after a flood ravaged downtown Ellicott City, Maryland, killing two people and ruining businesses and houses, Main Street will reopen on October 6. (WTOP, 10/5)

ARTOne Photographer Chronicles 30 Years of Life in Our City (City Paper, 10/6)

PHILANTHROPY
– Hurricane Matthew, the decade’s most powerful Atlantic tropical storm, has devastated parts of the Caribbean and is now expected to have a significant impact on the East Coast of the United States the next few days. Here’s how funders can help. (Center for Disaster Philanthropy, 10/6)

– Philanthropy and Social Innovation in the Age of #BlackLivesMatter (Invested Impact, 10/3)

 – How Philanthropy Can Help Bridge America’s Political Divide (SSIR, 9/30)


Social Sector Job Openings
Director, Community Affairs – NCA | CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield
President & CEO | Delaware Grantmakers Association
Philanthropic Services Associate | The Community Foundation for the National Capital
Senior Program Manager, Community Benefits | Kaiser Permanente
Nonprofit Financial Planning and Analysis Manager | Arabella Advisors
Education Finance and Policy Analyst | DC Fiscal Policy Institute
Communications Director | Grantmakers In Health
Program Director | Grantmakers In Health
Analyst | Arabella Advisors
Grants Coordinator | City of Takoma Park

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to seder@washingtongrantmakers.org. 


So much to learn about the tunnels under Capitol Hill.

The (Almost) Daily will be back on Tuesday!

– Buffy

New data show how life expectancy varies across the region

HEALTH/EQUITY | The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Virginia Commonwealth University’s Center on Society and Health have released a new map showing wide variations in life expectancy for babies born in different areas of the Greater Washington region. The map shows that opportunities to be as healthy as possible vary by neighborhood.

The aim of these maps is to serve as a resource—raising awareness of factors that shape health and spurring discussion and action on a complex web of factors that influence health. In this case, the average life expectancy in the District of Columbia and Prince George’s County is 78 years – 8 years shorter than for babies born in either Arlington or Fairfax Counties.

Related: Next month, Dr. Steven Woolf, head of the Center on Society and Health at VCU, will present as part of WRAG’s 2016 Brightest Minds series. Join us to learn more about the social and economic factors that influence health and contribute to wide disparities in life expectancy across our region. This event is open to the public. Find out more and register here.

COMMUNITY | The University of Maryland has announced a $75 million initiative to support student philanthropy work called the “Do Good Institute”, which will build on the work of formerly named UMD’s Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership and be run through the public policy school.  The goal of this new effort is to establish the University of Maryland as a global leader in advancing social change, philanthropy and nonprofit leadership. (WaPo, 9/22) UMD’s Do Good Institute is WRAG’s long-time partner on the Philanthropy Fellows program, through which over 50 students have gained experience in philanthropy and learned about the region at over 30 WRAG member organizations.

Related: WRAG is excited to welcome the 2016-2017 Philanthropy Fellows! Six students from the University of Maryland’s Do Good Institute are working with five WRAG members this year, on a variety of projects from grants administration and communications, to development and public policy initiatives. (Daily, 9/26)

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS
– DC has finalized the second annual youth homeless census, a nine-day push to count residents under 25 who don’t have permanent housing. (City Paper, 9/23)

 – D.C. Kicks Off $13 Million Affordable Housing Renovation in Ward 4 (City Paper, 9/23)

EDUCATION | As kindergarten ratchets up academics, parents feel the stress (WaPo, 9/25)

PHILANTHROPYPutting Data About Nonprofits to Work for Good (Chronicle, 9/23)


As we gear up for the first Presidential Debate tonight, it’s worth noting that Americans are quick to ask if candidates are giving enough, but they don’t follow up on how the money is being used – Buffy

 

Huge Response to New National Museum of African American History and Culture in DC

CULTURE | There’s an overwhelming demand for tickets to visit the new National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall which opens on September 24. All 28,500 opening weekend tickets were gone within an hour after they became available this past Saturday. The only tickets now available to reserve are for weekdays in October.

Twelve exhibitions with nearly 3,000 items will be available to view in the 85,000-square-foot space that tells the story of African American life, history and culture. (WaPo, 8/28)

To make the museum possible, more than $273 million was contributed from private donors, including the foundations of Oprah Winfrey, Bill and Melinda Gates, Shonda Rhimes, BET founder Robert L. Johnson and Michael Jordan.

POVERTY | I Am: The Strength, Value and Resilience of TANF Families is a new video made by TANF advocates and families in DC and supported by the Consumer Health Foundation.

Related: Protecting TANF as a lifeline (Daily, 3/16)

HOUSING
– WRAG’s Tamara Copeland stresses that every family deserves quality housing that they can afford as she highlights how structural racism may be playing out out in the housing arena in DC, and that there are two sides to every story. (Daily, 8/29)

 The biggest beneficiaries of housing subsidies? The wealthy. (GGW, 8/26)

EDUCATION
– School starts today in Montgomery County, which has seen huge growth in student enrollment the last eight years. (WaPo, 8/29)

– The Head Start program in Prince George’s County will now be run by a group based in Denver. (WTOP, 8/29)

ECONOMY | The Urban Institute provides an overview on how state economic agencies operate. (Urban Institute, 7/27)

RACE | The social network Next Door, used around the country, is facing criticism for posts that border on racial profiling. (WaPo, 8/29)

MILLENNIALSCorporate Ethics In The Era Of Millennials (NPR, 8/24)

NONPROFITS
The Plight of the Overworked Nonprofit Employee (The Atlantic, 8/24)

– Studies Examine Why People Give Differently Than They Invest (CP, 8/23)


Interesting … who knew you could remove all political posts from your Facebook feed? – Buffy

Prince George’s County Head Start Loses Millions in Grant Funding

EDUCATION 

The Department of Health and Human Services released a scathing report detailing Head Start deficiencies in the Prince George’s County school system, which resulted in the loss of a $6.3 million grant. The report cites abuse, poor teacher training, and a failure to correct past problems.The Head Start program is an early childhood program largely funded with federal dollars. (WaPo, 8/17)

Prince George’s school leaders are trying to determine how to keep the county’s Head Start program funded. The federal Administration for Children and Families released a statement Wednesday saying that the federal government “is committed to continuing Head Start services in Prince George’s County and to minimize any disruption to children and families.”

Related: After Funding Cut, What’s Next for Prince George’s Co. Head Start? (WTOP, 8/17)

– The Nation’s Teacher Force Lacks Diversity, and it Might Not Get Much Better. Minority students across the country would benefit from having more minority teachers studies show, but recruitment is a critical challenge for the future. (WaPo, 8/18)

– District Residents Have The Most Student Debt In The US. (WAMU, 8/15)

REGIONAL | A human-trafficking ring that operated for years and spanned from Northern Virginia to Baltimore has been shut down. (WaPo, 8/15)

FOOD/ART | How To Cultivate Plants Using Just Water, Nutrients And A Steady Diet Of DC Punk (WAMU, 8/12)

NONPROFITS | Communicating effectively about the real costs of running a nonprofit is imperative in order to engage and sustain donors and investors.  This post highlights how nonprofits can use new imagery to help educate about the sector. (NP Quarterly, 8/16)

PHILANTHROPY
 Women are Increasingly Powerful Philanthropists. But How Can They be Most Effective?  (Huff Po, 8/12) 

-Foundations and endowments are limiting the use of hedge fund investments in their portfolios according to a survey of nonprofit investors. (Bloomberg, 8/15)


At the end of one of the hottest weeks of the year, this isn’t looking so bad : ) … 2017 Farmers’ Almanac predicts a particularly cold, wet winter  for D.C., Maryland and Virginia – Buffy