Tag: medicaid

A glimpse into the region’s future

REGION
According to a new regional forecast from the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, the region’s population will continue to grow steadily and will add nearly 1.5 million residents over the next 30 years. Job growth is also expected to be significant. Officials are concerned a surge in residents to the region will continue to present challenges in providing affordable housing and quality transportation. (WaPo, 3/9)

The [District] is projected to expand from 672,000 residents last year to 987,000 in 2045, when it will be just shy of replacing Prince George’s County as the region’s third-most-populous jurisdiction, according to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG).

Fairfax and Montgomery counties will continue to rank first and second. They and other counties in the region will continue to grow. But only Charles County, which is a quarter of the District’s size, will gain population at a faster rate than the city.

Related: Last year, 2030 Group president Bob Buchanan and George Mason’s Center for Regional Analysis senior adviser and director of special projects Stephen Fuller, led the charge to undertake an extensive research project providing recommendations for ways in which the region can reposition itself to maximize potential and remain competitive in the global economy titled, The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Future Economy. WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland also shared how philanthropy in the region might respond and collaborate with other sectors to meet challenges facing our communities. (Daily 1/15)

HEALTH
– As misconceptions change about what the “face of HIV/AIDS” looks like, grassroots efforts are proving to be helpful in empowering those who are newly diagnosed. (WTOP, 3/10)

– Medicaid Rules Can Thwart Immigrants Who Need Dialysis (WAMU, 3/8)

EDUCATION/HOMELESSNESS | With recently-announced plans to replace the D.C. General shelter with smaller facilities, some are growing concerned about what the changes may mean for overcrowding in surrounding schools. (WCP, 3/8)

PHILANTHROPY/GENDER EQUITY | Mind the Gap – How Philanthropy Can Address Gender-Based Economic Disparities (PND, 3/8)

ARTSOpinion: One theatergoer shares his experience watching a popular Broadway show featuring a diverse cast, and how he felt when he look around and noticed the audience was anything but. (NPR, 3/8)

JOBS | The Abell Foundation is seeking to fill its Grants Associate position.


This quick quiz will guess your age, marital status, and income based on which mobile apps you have on your phone. My own results came pretty close! 

– Ciara

Achievement gap begins as early as infancy for D.C. children

DISTRICT/YOUTH
Despite being a national leader in providing universal preschool access to four- and five-year-olds, children in the District face an achievement gap that begins as early as infancy. According to a new study by Child Trends commissioned by the Bainum Family Foundation, there are significant disparities that persist in the lives of children in D.C. across neighborhood, racial, and class lines. (WaPo, 12/10)

The report, which draws on several years of local and federal data, describes “a tale of two cities” in the District — with children in the poorest neighborhoods, in Wards 7 and 8 east of the Anacostia River, born a world apart from those in the wealthiest neighborhoods, in Ward 3.

COMMUNITY | Grantmakers in Health has announced their newly-elected board members. Congratulations to WRAG Board Chair and president and CEO of the Northern Virginia Health Foundation Patricia N. Mathews on being among one of the new board members! (GIH, 12/9)

WORKFORCE | Mayor names Busboys and Poets owner Andy Shallal to key jobs post (WaPo, 12/14)

HEALTH
– A recent analysis by the DC Fiscal Policy Institute reveals that technical problems with D.C.’s Medicaid application system have created a backlog that may leave many low-income residents without health coverage. (WCP, 12/14)

Opinion: Why Are So Many Black Women Dying of AIDS? (NYT, 12/11)

POVERTY | When Government Tells Poor People How to Live (City Lab, 12/14)

PHILANTHROPY | What role does philanthropy play in fostering social movements? Here’s a brief history of how philanthropy found its place in joining the movement for school discipline reform. (Inside Philanthropy, 12/8)

SOCIAL PROFITS | Should social profit organizations model themselves to be more like businesses? To those that say, “absolutely,” one author presents a brief list of demands that social profit organizations will need from everyone else in order to do so. (NWB, 12/14)


A day in the life of Darth Vader.

– Ciara 

Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments releases new annual report on homelessness in the region

HOMELESSNESS/REGION
Though there were a number of reports over the last few months that pointed toward disappointing numbers, newly-released results from the annual point-in-time homelessness count found that the Greater Washington region saw a 2.7 percent decrease in homelessness from last year. Despite the slight drop, there is still much room for improvement. (WaPo, 5/13)

The tally, released Wednesday, confirmed a continued crisis of homelessness in the Washington region evident to almost anyone who lives, works or visits the city’s downtown core during winter, when homeless men and women amass in entrances to Metro stops and many other spots where they can stay warm. It also may have understated the challenge still faced by D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D), who has vowed to end chronic homelessness in the city.

Much of the overall dip resulted from a 300-person drop in homeless parents and children in D.C. shelters on the night of the count.

But unlike last year, when the number of homeless families peaked near the date of the 2014 federal count, this year several hundred entered shelter or were placed in overflow motel rooms in the District throughout February, March and even early April.

[…]

Beyond the District, numbers of homeless families also surged this winter in the city of Alexandria and in Fairfax, Frederick and Montgomery counties. Given that trend, few on Wednesday celebrated the slight decrease in the total from last year’s count.

The data comes from the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments new annual report, Homelessness in Metropolitan Washington.

–  D.C. Department of Human Services Director Laura Zeilinger spoke on the District’s own six percent decrease in homeless residents, stating that a celebration of the results would be too premature, “because there are still far too many people [who are homeless.] (City Paper, 5/13) 

Southeast D.C. facility for homeless veterans gets a boost (WaPo, 5/13)

WRAG/PHILANTHROPY | Interested in following the conversation from WRAG’s first-ever Loudoun County Philanthropy Conference? Check out the hashtag #FundLoudoun on Twitter to see what panelists and participants are saying.

NONPROFITS | Next month, the Center for Nonprofit Advancement, in partnership with the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, will hold a new, four-part communications series/training for leaders of nonprofits based in or serving residents of wards 7 or 8. The multi-day training seeks to help organizations strengthen their voices and raise awareness about issues affecting residents east of the river. For more information on how to register, click here.

POVERTY
Opinion: A number of emerging new studies are examining the long-term effects of government programs like the earned-income tax credit, Medicaid, SNAP, and more, on families. Though data can only go back so far, there is evidence that children whose families received benefits have better outcomes as they enter their 20s and 30s than those whose families were denied benefits. (NYT, 5/11)

Obama Urges Liberals and Conservatives to Unite on Poverty (NYT, 5/12)


How well can you read the emotions of others? Sometimes it’s all in the eyes! Take this quiz to see if you can tell what these people are thinking.

– Ciara

D.C. metro area leads U.S. in payroll to population rate

WORKFORCE
A new Gallup report ranks D.C. as number one for its payroll to population rate (P2P) among the 50 largest U.S. metros in 2014. Research implies that high rates of full-time employment and higher incomes create a higher sense of well-being. (DC Inno, 3/24)

Despite lagging behind in ninth place among metro areas ranked by unemployment rate, D.C. edged out No. 2 Salt Lake City and No. 3 Denver in 2014 with a payroll to population rate of 54.1 percent, according to a Gallup report. The polling organization tracks the metric each month, basing it off of full-time employment (30-plus hours per week) for adults aged 18 and older.

The P2P rate tends to be higher in urban areas with low unemployment, and the 50 largest metropolitan statistical areas in the U.S. proved that to be the case in 2014 with an average P2P rate of 46.0 percent, a full 2 percent higher than the P2P rate for all of the U.S.

[…]

Beyond that success locally, there are lingering concerns that labor force participation is still struggling. But again, D.C. is still doing far better that other metro areas, such as Tampa Bay and Miami, where the unemployment rates have still bobbed above 10 percent.

– Could nonprofits be doing more to lessen income inequality? Here are seven solutions for doing just that. (NPQ, 3/21)

EVENTS | WRAG has announced our first Brightest Minds event of 2015: Dr. Isabel Sawhill of the Brookings Institution. According to Dr. Sawhill, author of Generation Unbound: Drifting into Sex and Parenthood without Marriage, the growing trend of unwed and unplanned motherhood calls for a “new ethic of responsible parenthood.” Join us as Dr. Sawhill explores these societal trends and their impact on child poverty and wellness, and explains how the social sector can effectively support efforts for change. This event, on April 30, is open to both WRAG members and nonmembers. More details here.

ARTS
– At a recent event hosted by Elevation DC and the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, panelists discussed the importance of expanding access to the arts to everyone in the community, and shared what they’re doing to ensure it happens. (Elevation DC, 3/24)

– In Montgomery County’s Sandy Spring Museum, a new exhibit showing off handmade books by immigrant youths – many of whom are among the unaccompanied minors from Central America who now reside in the region – is on display. The exhibit runs through May 31. (Gazette, 3/18)

Related: On Tuesday, March 31 at 9:00 AM, WRAG members and invited guests can attend a funder briefing on Immigration Relief and the Impact on the D.C. Region. The special event, sponsored by a number of WRAG members, will be moderated by Rose Ann Cleveland of The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, and  includes remarks by Cecilia Muñoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council; a panel with Gustavo Torres, executive director of CASA; DJ Yoon, executive director of the National Korean American Services & Education Consortium; and Maya, immigrant leader and potential beneficiary.

HEALTH
– Last year, under the Affordable Care Act, a number of states opted to expand their Medicaid coverage. According to newly released data, states that did expand the program saw a 23 percent increase in Type II diabetes cases, and states that did not expand Medicaid saw very little difference. This data shows how the expansion led to care for many who were previously undiagnosed. (NPR, 3/23)

D.C. Health Link customers saw some of the smallest premium increases in region (WBJ, 3/23)

REGION | 4 Projects That Are Going to Change Washington (Washingtonian, 3/24)

CSR | The application period ends this Friday, March 27, for the Fairfax County Chamber of Commerce’s 2015 Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards. The awards honor individuals, businesses, and nonprofits who have gone above and beyond in business leadership, employee engagement, and corporate social responsibility. Find out more here.


Some museums hold more than just historic relics and works of art. Some also hold pretty cool secrets

– Ciara

The White House moves to accelerate impact investing

IMPACT INVESTING
In an effort to accelerate impact investing, the White House has launched a public-private partnership following a roundtable discussion to create a stronger workforce and community. (White House, 6/25)

[…] officials met with more than 20 private-sector investors answering the President’s call to action by announcing their new commitments to make more than $1.5 billion in investments that intentionally generate sound financial return as well as measurable social or environmental impact.

COMMUNITY │ Planting a rooftop garden, leading a resume workshop, volunteering at a children’s hospital, serving meals to the homeless, all in one day? All that and more are possible on Deloitte’s IMPACT Day. Learn about Deloitte’s dedication to serving its community during its 15th Annual IMPACT Day. (U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, 6/26)

HIV │ The Whitman-Walker “AIDS Walk Washington” will now become the “Walk to End HIV” to signify the progress being made in the District to end AIDS. (City Paper, 6/25)

WORKFORCE │ Following President Obama’s executive order in January to raise the minimum wage for federal wage workers and the recent Summit on Working Families in D.C., around 150 federal women-workers marched to demand higher wages to afford the District’s high cost of living. (WaPo, 6/36)

HOUSING │ As the housing debate wages on, this blog post turns attention to another aspect of the conversation – homelessness in college students. (HATDC, 6/25)

HEALTHCARE │ Virginia’s Battle Over Medicaid May Head to Court (WAMU, 6/26)


Here are 25 Things Everyone Should Experience in Virginia at Least Once…and here’s a list for Maryland.  How many have you done so far?

-Ciara

 

Middle schools are DCPS’ next big challenge

EDUCATION
– The “looming challenge” for the D.C. public school system, according to the Post, is the high rate of attrition among students entering middle schools. A significant number of families pull their children out of the traditional school system to avoid sending their kids to DCPS middle schools, which are perceived to be substandard (WaPo, 2/18):

After the 2011-12 school year, 11 percent of the system’s fourth-graders did not continue on to fifth grade in a traditional D.C. public school, according to city data. From fifth grade to sixth grade — the city’s usual transition point from elementary to middle school — the system’s enrollment that same year plummeted by 24 percent.

Often, those leaving D.C. schools are those with the most educated and engaged parents, who worry that the city’s middle schools won’t prepare their children for the rigors of high school and beyond. They cite poor academic results, concerns about safety, discipline and culture, and a lack of course variety and extracurricular activities that students need to stay engaged and to prepare for high school.

Greater Greater Education asks: More and more DC students are taking AP classes, but what are they getting from the experience? (GGE, 2/14)

– In a New York Times op-ed, two foundation leaders, including Kenneth Zimmerman of the Open Society Foundations, highlight positive changes in school discipline policies that have reduced the number of suspensions in California and Maryland schools (NY Times, 2/16):

Ultimately, full-scale change requires giving teachers the tools and resources to effectively manage their classrooms. It also means ensuring that students are not victims of the kind of stereotyping or racial bias that results in unfair punishments. As a nation, we need to embrace the reforms, both large and small, that keep students in school learning rather than out of school misbehaving.

DAILY | Today we’re announcing some changes to the Daily WRAG.

WORKFORCE
– The New York Times has a cool tool to measure how many more hours you would need to work (or debt you would need to take on) to get by on minimum wage in your state. (NY Times, 2/8)

Intellectually disabled struggling to find work (WaPo, 2/17)

HEALTH CARE | Va. Senate panel proposes alternative to Medicaid expansion (WaPo, 2/17)

ENVIRONMENT | There’s a 443-foot long machine digging a 13-mile long tunnel beneath D.C. that will one day help deal with the wastewater that today runs into the Anacostia, Potomac, and Rock Creek. (WaPo, 2/15)


Here are some cool photos from the first 12 winter Olympics. The outfits were definitely different. The ski jump was just as terrifying.

And, hat tip to Philanthropy Fellow Sara Gallagher, who passed along this video – what a conference call would be like in real life.

– Rebekah

A slow news day in August edition

HEALTHCARE | The District has reached a settlement with D.C. Chartered Health Plan that will ultimately release the $56.5 million in payments due to local medical providers that serve patients on Medicaid. (WaPo, 8/22)

YOUTH | After the recent spate of murders of young people in Prince George’s County, parents, community leaders, and county officials are trying to figure out how to “impact young people so we don’t lose more lives.” (WaPo, 8/22)

EDUCATION
– A Greater Greater Education contributor says DCPS’ test score data don’t necessarily back up the story that school officials are telling. (GGE, 8/21)

– DCPS is seriously slacking on meeting Title IX requirements, leaving girls with few opportunities to participate in sports. (CP, 8/22)

HOUSING | What Should D.C. Learn From Other Cities’ Inclusionary Zoning? (Not Much.) (CP, 8/20)

AGING | John Feather, CEO of Grantmakers In Aging, writes about the importance of investing in seniors for stronger communities. (CoF, 8/21)

NONPROFITS | September Is Boom Time for Donors, Google Says  (Chronicle, 8/21)

LOCAL | Well, if there was ever a day for me to end my boycott of hotdogs covered with chile today would be the day! (WaPo, 8/22)


Holy ****, stay out of the Potomac!

-Rebekah

Data on America’s reliance on government benefits…Suspensions of young students in local schools criticized…Prince George’s to get help from HUD [News, 2/13.12]

According to data compiled by the New York Times, government benefits – including Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security – now account for an average of 17.6% of Americans’ personal income. That percentage has more than doubled over the last forty years.

The Times has created a detailed map of statistics about benefits. In our region, every county and the District receive a lower-than-average percentage of total benefits. For individual categories, our region is lower-than-average in all but two areas:

– Medicaid accounts for an average of 4.05% of personal income in the District, compared to 3.1% nationally.

– Prince George’s, Charles, and Prince William counties are slightly above the 0.4% average for veterans benefits.

There’s a lot to digest, so take a few minutes to interact with the map. The good news is that our region has remained below the average for the last four decades. (NYTimes, 2/11)

Related: Here are accompanying infographics about our country’s increasing reliance on the safety net. (NYTimes, 2/11)

EDUCATION | The Post takes a look at our region’s school districts and finds that more than 6,000 students from pre-kindergarten to grade 5 were suspended last year. Education advocates are critical of the disciplinary practice – which they say young children comprehend no differently than a snow day – and of many of the reasons for imposing it.

The Children’s Law Center’s Judith Sandalow says that suspensions for young children miss the point: “It is a sign they are experiencing something in their lives, and they should be helped.” (WaPo, 2/13)

HOUSING | Prince George’s County’s housing department is getting some help. The federal Department of Housing and Urban Development is dispatching specialists to help the county “do a better job of managing housing programs and other community revitalization efforts.” (WaPo, 2/13) Hopefully not this dud of a “specialist”!

DISTRICT
– Here’s a recap of Mayor Gray’s One City Summit, which gave citizens an opportunity to vote on city priorities. (WaPo, 2/13)

Obama Budget Includes Language on D.C. Budget Autonomy (DCist, 2/13)

IDENTITY | WAMU takes a look at the conversation around the terms “black” and “African American” as racial identifiers – and the complications that arise for groups like Black Latinos that are stuck having to identify (on paper) as one group or another. (WAMU, 2/13)


I didn’t catch much of the Grammy Awards last night, but I did see the Beach Boys reunion performance with Brian Wilson. It was awesome. But the best part was when the camera cut to Lady Gaga in the audience, who looked really uncomfortable trying to dance to real music.

Along the same lines, here’s a truly embarrassing commentary on pop culture today – the Twitterspehere’s reaction to Paul McCartney’s performance. Who?