Tag: lgbtqia

Decriminalizing sex work in the District

PUBLIC HEALTH/CRIMINAL JUSTICE | A coalition of sex workers and their advocates have introduced a bill, the Community Safety and Health Amendment Act of 2019, to decriminalize the sale and purchase of sex in the District. (CP, 6/3)

The world of people who sell sex for money in DC is not a monolith with one blanket policy need … among their ranks are those who sell sex by choice; those who sell sex to survive, feed their children, and stave off homelessness; and those who sell sex against their will because they’ve been trafficked. Under the current law in DC, police can arrest and charge anyone who sells sex and under this new bill, police would no longer have cause or power to employ this tactic for catching sellers of sex mid-sale—a change that many sex workers and their advocates enthusiastically endorse.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | Minneapolis ended exclusive single-family zoning. Could the DC region do the same? (WBJ, 6/6)

LGBTQIA | DC’s LGTBQIA communities continue to fight for some basic rights—and celebrate their victories, too. (CP, 6/6)

ENVIRONMENT
Key Urban Agriculture Programs Delayed as City Swaps Who Will Manage Them (CP, 6/7)

– Michael Bloomberg’s foundation said that he will donate $500 million to a new campaign to close every coal-fired power plant in the United States and halt the growth of natural gas. (NYT, 6/6)

MARYLAND | Residents voice concerns over Montgomery County policing (WTOP, 6/7)

DC/CULTURE | The DC Public Library is launching a three-part Go-Go Book Club, in collaboration with Washington Performing Arts and the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. (dcist, 6/6)

TRANSIT/CLIMATE | Maryland and Virginia plan to expand roads, in defiance of their own climate goals (GGWash, 6/6)

GENTRIFICATION | What’s In A Name? Residents East Of The Anacostia River Say, ‘Everything.’  (WAMU, 6/7)

PHILANTHROPY
– A new report,  Nonprofit Executives and the Racial Leadership Gap, details that people of color who lead nonprofits face barriers and challenges that their white counterparts don’t. (Chronicle, 6/4)

– Fund the People has launched the Talent Justice Initiative to help funders and nonprofits invest in intersectional racial equity across the nonprofit career lifecycle and workforce.

– Has the Giving Pledge Changed Giving? (Chronicle, 6/4)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Director | Open Society Institute-Baltimore – New!
Director, School Partnerships Coach | Flamboyan Foundation – New!
Senior Director of Development, Research & Innovation | Children’s Hospital Foundation – New!
Senior Program Manager | Rising Tide Foundation
Development Manager | Mikva Challenge DC
Foundation Director | Venable LLP
Development Associate | Sitar Arts Center
Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Blueberries all day, every day

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday!

– Buffy

Middle-income seniors may be unable to afford housing and care in the future

HOUSING
–  According to a recent study published in the journal Health Affairs, the number of middle-income seniors is projected to soar in the next 10 years, and many of them will be unable to afford housing and care. In metropolitan areas such as DC, where the cost of living is higher than the national average, the problem is especially acute. (WaPo, 5/28)

Seniors who have too much income to qualify for government-subsidized housing and don’t make enough to live in a luxury development will be left behind … and for those without homes to sell or borrow against, the outlook is bleak: In 2029, 81 percent of middle-income seniors without equity in housing will have an annual income that is below the projected annual $62,000 for assisted living rent and estimated out of pocket medical spending, the study found … “Even if we assume that seniors devote 100 percent of their annual income to seniors housing — setting aside any personal expenses — only 19 percent of middle-income seniors will have financial resources that exceed today’s costs of assisted living,” the study said.

Opinion: The 2020 DC Council budget may cut the Affordable Housing Preservation Tool, which provides an opportunity for residents to stay in their homes with affordable rents. Eliminating funding for the AHPF in 2020 means, at minimum, a $60 million cut in funds to preserve affordable housing. (GGWash, 5/24)

EDUCATION | Five new charter schools are planned for the District for the 2020-2021 academic year but there are concerns that city resources will be affected and their opening may result in more empty seats at existing middle and high schools that are struggling to attract students. (WaPo, 5/26)

ENVIRONMENT | Can the DC area clean up its waste problem? (WTOP, 5/27)

POVERTY/HUNGER | It’s World Hunger Day. Here’s why so many people still suffer from malnutrition. (WaPo, 5/28)

DISTRICT | Long-standing tax breaks for tech companies in the District could be cut and the revenue used instead to fund social services. (WAMU, 5/27)

LGBTQIA | Transgender Military Members Say Ban Is ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell 2.0’ (WAMU, 5/28)

GUN VIOLENCE | Giving Up Guns: High-Risk Veterans Are Ready To Talk About It (WAMU, 5/24)

PHILANTHROPY | One Foundation CEO’s Plan to Respond to Today’s Outrages. What’s Yours? (Chronicle, 5/22)


Hunting for mushrooms with the Mycological Association of Washington.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Thursday!

– Buffy

Is the solution to the District’s housing crisis to invest in the middle class?

HOUSING | A strategy to produce and preserve workforce housing is gaining support among elected officials and developers to address the affordable housing shortage in the District. (WAMU, 5/2)

In her proposed 2020 budget, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has called for the creation of an unprecedented $20 million “workforce housing” fund that would subsidize homes affordable to middle-income professionals like teachers, social workers, and first responders… Many developers applaud the mayor’s workforce fund, saying it will help incentivize builders to construct and preserve housing that isn’t market-rate or “luxury.” Businesses tend to like it, too, because they want to be where the workforce lives. But the applause is countered by critics who say the mayor should instead invest that $20 million in low-income housing — particularly public housing, an estimated third of which is currently uninhabitable due to hazardous conditions.

EDUCATION | Prince George’s County may become the first jurisdiction in the country to use a public-private partnership to build and maintain several of its public schools, to speed up construction and decrease debt. (WaPo, 5/5)

LGBTQIA+ | Transgender teens in schools with bathroom restrictions are at higher risk of sexual assault, study says (CNN, 5/6)

WORKFORCE
– This co-working space doubles as a child care center. (WAMU, 5/6)

– Participants in a District workforce development program have not received the training they expected and are still unemployed. (CP, 5/2)

PRISON REFORM
– The District is looking into how it might obtain local control over the parole system again. (DCist, 5/1)

Maryland just banned placing pregnant inmates in solitary confinement. Yes, that was apparently happening. (WaPo, 5/1)

VIRGINIA | Fairfax board adopts budget with more for affordable housing, environment (WaPo, 3/7)

DISTRICT | The DC Inspector General says the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs has failed to track and collect on fines from businesses, developers and landlords who break the rules. (WAMU, 3/7)

COMMUNITY | Congrats to Natalie Madeira Cofield, founder & CEO of Walker’s Legacy and the Walker’s Legacy Foundation, for being named the Women in Business Champion of the Year by the DC Chamber of Commerce. (Walker’s Legacy Foundation is a fiscally-sponsored project of WRAG.)

PHILANTHROPY | New CEO at Council on Foundations Pledges Greater Accountability (Chronicle, 5/1)


Sleep in a ‘Glamping Globe’ on the roof of the Watergate? Yes please.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday!

– Buffy

Fairfax County plans to invest millions to boost affordable housing

HOUSING
– Fairfax County officials are discussing new plans to strengthen investments in affordable housing programs in fiscal year 2020. They also plan to increase spending right now to $15 million to help developers pursue affordable housing projects, and to hire a new “housing in all policies coordinator” who will manage the county’s efforts. (WBJ, 4/29)

Those changes are merely the first stage of a broader effort to meet the recommendations of a task force studying the county’s housing needs. That group wants to see Fairfax add 5,000 new homes affordable to people making 60 percent or less of the area median income — that would apply to anyone making an annual salary of at least $46,350 — over the next 15 years. To meet that goal, the board is directing county staff to draft “innovative land use policies” to expand affordable housing projects, running the gamut from new density bonuses to more flexible parking requirements.

– As the number of families with multiple generations living under one roof is rising, home builders are focusing on extended families. (WAMU, 4/24)

Should cities subsidize housing for a family making $141,000? (WaPo, 4/29)

VIRGINIA | Amazon posts first jobs for HQ2, says project is ‘ahead of schedule’ (WaPo, 4/29)

LGBTQIA+/EDUCATION | The school boards in Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, and Arlington are supporting the rights of transgender students, weighing in on a case involving a teenager’s legal fight over his attempt to use the boys’ restroom at his high school. (WaPo, 4/29)

IMMIGRATION | Trump tightens asylum rules, will make immigrants pay fees to seek humanitarian refuge (WaPo, 4/30)

ENVIRONMENT | Global Inequality Is 25% Higher Due to Climate Instability (Truthout, 4/27)

HATE/JUSTICE | One day after Passover ended, an interfaith group gathered at the All Dulles Area Muslim Society to celebrate at an event that featured a moment of silence — and a continued resolve to counter hatred — after Saturday’s deadly shooting at a California synagogue. (WTOP, 4/29)

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS | Arlington plan for managing mass casualties is first in nation (WTOP, 4/29)

GUN VIOLENCE | Newtown Wasn’t an End for Gun Control. It Was a Beginning. (NYT, 4/29)

PHILANTHROPY | How Philanthropy Can Curb the Rise of Hate: Count It, Condemn it, Confront It (Chronicle, 4/29)


Interesting visual of 25 years of sprawl in Northern Virginia.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday!

– Buffy

The number of children in the region in foster care is down

CHILD WELFARE | There are half as many kids in foster care in the Greater Washington region than there were 10 years ago, and child welfare experts believe this is a sign of success for programs working to keep families together. But despite the achievements, there are still challenges. (WAMU, 4/17)

While the numbers of children in foster care in the region has declined since 2008…there’s now a larger percentage of older children in foster care who need placement with families, which this presents a different challenge… Additionally, agencies say they need more parents who are available to foster. The system’s racial makeup is also off balance. In 2017, more than two-thirds of children in foster care in the Washington region were African American, according to the report by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments.

RACIAL EQUITY | Two new updates from the Meyer Foundation team: Maryland Program Director Julian Haynes writes about Meyer’s work to address school pushout, and Aisha Alexander-Young, Senior Director for Strategy & Equity, discusses her role at the foundation and how it is driven by a commitment to anti-racism. (Medium, 4/16)

HOUSING
Conflict brewing over HQ2-tied affordable housing money (WBJ, 4/17)

– Notwithstanding the housing crunch, there is a construction freeze in Montgomery County near four schools in an attempt to control class size. (WAMU, 4/16)

Did Silver Spring build enough housing to stay affordable? Sort of. (GGWash, 4/17)

HEALTH/INEQUALITY | What Would a Post-ACA America Look Like? (Truthout, 4/11)

SOCIAL IMPACT | Reimagining the Economy: The Social Justice Enterprise (NPQ, 4/15)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum – New!
Director of Institutional Writing and Strategy​ | ​League of Conservation Voters Education Fund
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Development Director​ | ​Greater DC Diaper Bank
Grants Manager, Data and Reporting​ | ​The Colorado Health Organization
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Racial Justice Program Officer​ | ​Wellspring Philanthropic Fund
Program Officer​ | ​The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
President and CEO | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation
Program Manager | DC127
Development Manager  | DC127
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase
Programs Officer | DC Bar Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Did you see the large meteor that exploded in the sky earlier this week?

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday next week!

– Buffy

Urgent care center to open east of the river in the District is a step forward for health equity

HEALTH/EQUITY | The first urgent care center is coming to Wards 7 and 8, which advocates say is long overdue and a major step forward in the fight for health equity. MBI Health Services will open the center, which will be a 24/7 site for any acute problem that doesn’t truly require a trip to the emergency room. (CP, 3/13)

MBI hopes to finish building out its center by November of this year. As far as their doctors are concerned, it couldn’t open soon enough. MBI CEO Marie Morilus-Black says that “at least once a week, sometimes more, we have to call an ambulance for one of our patients because their [blood] pressure is so high as to be at a stroke level.” She wants to send them to an urgent care rather than to the ER, but there aren’t any east of the river. So she decided to start her own.

HOUSING
– Citi has maintained top position as the largest affordable housing lender in the country. (Affordable Housing Finance, 3/4)

Our property tax system rewards neglect and punishes investment in struggling neighborhoods (GGW, 3/11)

RACIAL EQUITY
– Montgomery County Council President Nancy Navarro and County Executive Marc Elrich stand united in the creation of a new racial equity and social justice policy.

– City planners need to talk about race. The lives of our residents depend on it (GGW, 3/12)

– A racial slur aimed at three black children on a DC schoolyard has moved a public elementary school with a mostly white, wealthy student body to examine school inclusivity and discipline policies. (WaPo, 3/12)

TRANSIT | More (rich) people are living near DC Metro stations, but fewer are riding. (WaPo, 3/11)

LGBTQIA+ | ‘Gender Neutral’ ID Bill Gains Traction in Annapolis (Bethesda Magazine, 3/11)

PHILANTHROPY | How Liberatory Philanthropy and Restorative Investing Can Remake the Economy (NPQ, 2/28)


Interesting – a history of DC’s Daylight Saving mishaps

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back this week on Friday!

– Buffy

The federal government shutdown cost to the District of $47 million will affect upcoming DC budget talks

SHUTDOWN/DISTRICT | According to a recent quarterly revenue estimate prepared by the DC Chief Financial Officer, the 35-day federal government shutdown cost the District $47.4 million worth of revenue, challenging city officials as they prepare for upcoming 2020 budget talks on spending priorities and programs. (WAMU, 3/1)

Advocacy groups and Council members have been lobbying Mayor Bowser on how best to allocate spending in the upcoming budget – including increasing taxes on businesses and high-income residents to pay for affordable housing, homeless services, schools, and health programs. In a statement on the revenue estimate, Bowser called the shutdown “historic and unnecessary” but said it served as “a reminder of why we continue the work of diversifying our economy and making our city an attractive place to do business.”

RACISM
The ‘heartbreaking’ decrease in black homeownership – racism and rollbacks in government policies are taking their toll. (WaPo, 2/28)

Former DC Mayor Sharon Pratt Launches Discussion Series With Panel on Blackface (City Paper, 2/27)

PUBLIC HEALTH
– DC Mayor Bowser released an extensive plan over two months ago to cut opioid overdose deaths in half by late 2020, but key programs in the plan haven’t yet been started. (WaPo, 3/3)

Conditions In The DC Jail Are Unsafe And Unsanitary, DC Auditor Says (dcist, 3/1)

HOUSING | The most cost-effective way to help the homeless is to give them homes (Vox, 2/20)

TRANSIT
– The most expensive commutes in the US  are in Charles County in southern Maryland. Residents there spent about two and a half weeks on average traveling to and from work in 2017, and workers in Fauquier and Stafford Counties in Virginia didn’t fare much better. (Bloomberg, 2/28)

– The Montgomery County Council hopes to expand the “kids ride free” Ride On bus program to weekends to accommodate students. (Bethesda Magazine, 2/28)

LGBTQIA+ 
– A kindergarten class in Arlington, VA held a celebration of transgender students during last week’s Read Across America Day. (WaPo, 3/3)

– ‘A Step Backwards For Our Denomination’: D.C. Methodists Grieve Vote To Exclude LGBTQ Clergy And Marriages (dcist, 3/1)

PHILANTHROPY | A recent survey by Grantmakers for Education found that three-quarters of foundations said their grants go toward helping low-income people, LGBTQ students, immigrants and refugees, women and girls, and people with disabilities. (Chronicle, 2/28 – Subscription)


Groovy – in the ’60s and ’70s, West Hyattsville, MD was a hotbed for psychedelic, trippy music.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

New housing unit for adults with disabilities underway in Rockville

DISABILITY RIGHTS| As the number of children with developmental disabilities increases and housing becomes limited after age 21, projects focused on adults with disabilities are growing across the country. (WaPo, 2/12)

Waiting lists for group homes are long, and the homes are not a good fit for everyone. Living alone with a caregiver can be isolating and potentially dangerous. Meanwhile, the need for housing solutions is growing. The CDC said in 2018 that approximately 1 in 59 children is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, and in the next 10 years an estimated 500,000 people with autism will enter adulthood, with almost 424,000 on waiting lists for residential services, according to Kim Musheno, vice president of public policy for the Autism Society of America.

EDUCATION
– Debate Over Charter School Transparency Rooted In DC’s Struggle For Local Governance (WAMU, 2/12)

– Acting schools chancellor Lewis Ferebee testified this week before the DC Council and got a glimpse into the politics that may await him if he is confirmed as chancellor of the DC public school system. (WaPo, 2/12)

RACE
– Blackface is just a symptom of American medicine’s racist past (WaPo, 2/12)

– Wilson High School in DC is considering changing the name, based on the former President’s policies and prejudices. (WAMU, 2/13)

HEALTH | Virginia moves closer to raising the legal smoking age from 18 to 21. (WaPo, 2/12)

TRANSIT/EQUITY
– Under a new plan being proposed by Metro, the agency would subsidize an Uber, Lyft or other on-demand trip to fill the late-night service gap for workers. (WaPo, 2/13)

– Transit Equity Day was celebrated across the country this year on February 4 in honor of Rosa Parks, and is focusing on transit as a civil rights issue and a component of a climate-safe future. (NPQ, 2/4)

LGBTQIA+  | Having experienced harassment in the past, a homophobic pamphlet was recently found in The Washington Blade newspaper, the city’s free LGBTQIA+ newspaper. (DCist, 2/12)

NONPROFITS | Nonprofit Workforce Study Finds Strengths in Growth, Pay, and Resilience (NPQ, 2/7)

PHILANTHROPY | How Foundations Can Help Opportunity Zone Communities Succeed (SSIR, 2/7)


Wait, we just had snow in Hawaii??

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Those experiencing homelessness more vulnerable to violent crime

HOMELESSNESS | In a new report, the National Coalition for the Homeless documents that those experiencing homelessness are more likely to be victims of violent crime than the general population, arguing that the dehumanization they experience leads to their marginalization and leaves them unprotected. (GG Washington, 2/5)

In their latest report, “Vulnerable to Hate: A Survey of Bias-Motivated Violence against People Experiencing Homelessness in 2016-2017,” the NCH documented at least 112 anti-homeless attacks that occurred in the United States in 2016 and 2017 and analyzed 1,769 reported acts of violence committed against people experiencing homeless from 1999-2017. Of the 1,769 violent acts, 476 victims lost their lives as a result.

RACIAL EQUITY
– In her latest blog post, WRAG’s managing director of corporate strategy, Katy Moore, reflects on the significance of the racist photo from Governor Northam’s yearbook page, and the relationship between racist imagery and the deep racial inequities that underlie our social systems. (Daily, 2/7)

– During Black History Month, DC educators embrace Black Lives Matter week, and tackle a challenging and sensitive topic: how to talk about race with young students. (DC Line, 2/4)

PHILANTHROPY |  “Why we give – The need to connect and belong,”  – TedX Talk by Community Foundation for Northern Virginia‘s President and CEO, Eileen Ellsworth.

IMMIGRATION | DC Mayor Bowser has awarded the National Immigration Forum a $100,000 grant to support city employees and residents who are trying to become U.S. citizens. (WaPo, 2/4)

LGBTQIA/EQUITY | Gender-neutral bathrooms benefit a lot of people. Our region needs more of them. (GG Washington, 2/6)

HOUSING | A bill was introduced this week to revoke the DC Housing Authority’s status as an independent agency and fold it into the purview of the Office of the Mayor. (City Paper, 2/5)

HEALTH | A smoking ban currently in place in Rockville and Gaithersburg could soon cover all of Montgomery County. (WTOP, 2/6)

CRIMINAL JUSTICE
– The U.S. Attorney for DC has announced a strategy to prosecute some gun-related crimes in federal court, rather than DC Superior Court. According to the ACLU, this would contribute to mass incarceration. (WaPo, 2/6)

– DC officials are putting an additional $6 million toward violence prevention and jobs training programs in light of the recent increase in violence across the city. (DC Line, 2/2)

COMMUNITY | BB&T and SunTrust are set to combine in a $66B deal that will result in the third largest bank in the DC area by market share (WBJ, 2/7)

SHUTDOWN | DC Is Preparing For The Possibility Of Another Shutdown (WAMU, 2/5)

VIRGINIA | Northern Virginia lawmakers are welcoming Amazon to the region. (DCist, 2/5)


The Oscars won’t have a host this year – the first time since 1989 when Rob Lowe danced with Snow White in an opening number that is now considered the most cringe-worthy moment in awards-show history.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back tomorrow!

– Buffy

DC officials take steps to protect unpaid federal workers during shutdown

SHUTDOWN
– The DC Council passed emergency legislation on Tuesday to expand the safety net for unpaid federal employees and contractors during the partial government shutdown, and the Bowser administration is providing $2 million in emergency funds to help food stamp recipients. (WaPo, 1/23)

Mayor Muriel E. Bowser also announced she was introducing legislation to give the city authority to grant unemployment benefits to essential employees who must show up to work without pay, such as TSA airport screeners and special police. The U.S. Labor Department denied her request to authorize such benefits last week. “They are deemed essential, they are required to go to work, and they are not getting paid,” she said at a news conference at a warehouse for the Capital Area Food Bank, one of the charities ramping up services during the shutdown. “They provide some of the most vital services for us.”

– ‘Barely Treading Water’: Why The Shutdown Disproportionately Affects Black Americans (NPR, 1/14)

RACIAL EQUITY | The DC Council voted on Tuesday to override Mayor Muriel Bowser’s veto of its legislation decriminalizing fare evasion on Metro, arguing that Black residents are disproportionately impacted by fare evasion enforcement. (WaPo, 1/22)

HEALTH | Maryland could become the first state to put a cap on prescription drug costs by creating a state board tasked with limiting what people pay for prescriptions. (WAMU, 1/22)

EDUCATION | The Kirwan Commission approved a $3.8 billion increase in spending on public schools to make Maryland’s public schools some of the “best in the country.” (Sun, 1/18)

ENVIRONMENT | DC Mayor Muriel Bowser signed a sweeping clean energy law, requiring all of DC’s electricity to come from renewable sources such as wind and solar by 2032. (GGW, 1/22)

LGBTQIA | The Supreme Court has reinstated President Trump’s ban on transgender military service during a lower-court appeals process. (NPR, 1/22)

VIRGINIA
Equal Rights Amendment Proposal Fails To Advance In Virginia Legislature (WAMU, 1/22)

– Virginia lawmaker proposes legislation to help youth in foster care. (Inside Nova, 1/21)

PHILANTHROPY
– United Philanthropy Forum members are working to eliminate racism and advance racial equity, diversity and inclusion in philanthropy.

– A new Urban Institute report validates the recent Chronicle of Philanthropy findings that ranks greater DC as a place of exceptional giving, but also shows that there is considerable variation among giving patterns within the region. (Urban Institute, 12/21)


To help stem population decline, small towns around the world are offering homes to newcomers at almost no-cost – hellloooooo Australia!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy