Tag: LGBT

A regional approach to opioid addiction

REGION| DC, Maryland and Virginia officials gathered at the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments‘ Regional Opioid and Substance Abuse Summit yesterday to discuss how to address the growing opioid addiction crisis in the region. All three jurisdictions agreed that having a system that monitored prescriptions is a major component to combating the issue. (WaPo, 5/9)

There were 198 opioid-related deaths in the District in the first 11 months of 2016. All three jurisdictions have seen steady increases in the number of opioid-related deaths. Hogan said Tuesday that six people die in Maryland each day, on average, as a result of overdosing on opioids — more than are killed by guns or in vehicle accidents.

Bowser, Hogan and McAuliffe noted that each of their jurisdictions have launched public-awareness campaigns, expanded access to overdose-reversal drugs, increased funding for treatment and taken steps to improve collaboration between agencies.

NONPROFIT SUMMER LEARNING SERIES | WRAG is excited to announce that our Nonprofit Summer Learning Series, in partnership with Booz Allen Hamilton, is open for registration! Nonprofits, join us as local funders pull the curtain back on philanthropy. (Daily, 5/10)

HEALTH | Why maintaining health insurance is difficult when you are experiencing homelessness. (StreetSense, 5/4)

TRANSIT
– Here’s a map of the most dangerous intersections in the District. (WaPo, 5/9)

– People With Disabilities Lose Free Parking Downtown (WAMU, 5/8)

LGBTQ | A Virginia federal court of appeals has been asked to consider if three couples can challenge a law allowing magistrates with religious objections to refuse to perform marriages between same-sex couples. (WTOP, 5/10)

ENVIRONMENT | Activists and others worry as Maryland’s prosecution of environmental crimes has dropped significantly. (Baltimore Sun, 5/10)


A journey to remember…

– Kendra

Where you live in DC determines the availability of medical care

HEALTH 
– Where people live in D.C. affects their access to non-emergency medical care. In addition to emergency vehicles taking longer to get east of the Anacostia River, fewer clinics, pharmacies, and vaccination centers means access to non-emergency medical care is more difficult there as well. (GGW, 10/4)

No urgent care or retail clinics have opened in Wards 4 or 8 since 2010, and nearly 70% of all D.C.’s clinics are in Wards 2 and 3. This gap is partially filled by community health centers. Community health centers receive federal funding to provide primary care to underserved populations. One such clinic, Unity Health Care, operates a community health centers in all wards except 2, 3, and 4, with varying degrees of walk-in services.

– ‘An act of kindness’: Medical aid-in-dying legislation advances in the District (WaPo, 10/6)

TRANSPORTATIONMontgomery’s new bus rapid transit system will make the county more equitable (GGW, 10/5)

EDUCATION
– Study finds 10 percent of Virginia schoolchildren are chronically absent (WaPo, 10/5)

– Although it hasn’t been discussed much on the campaign trail, education is on the minds of the electorate. (Atlantic, 10/1)

LGBT | For D.C.’s LGBT Community, A Police Liaison Who Can Relate (WAMU, 10/6)

NONPROFITS Corporate America Emerging Source for Nonprofit CFOs (NPQ, 10/5)

ENVIRONMENT | The James River in Virginia at Jamestown, where America’s first permanent English settlement was founded in 1607, was just cited as being among America’s “most endangered” historic places by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. (WTOP, 10/5)

MARYLAND | Two months after a flood ravaged downtown Ellicott City, Maryland, killing two people and ruining businesses and houses, Main Street will reopen on October 6. (WTOP, 10/5)

ARTOne Photographer Chronicles 30 Years of Life in Our City (City Paper, 10/6)

PHILANTHROPY
– Hurricane Matthew, the decade’s most powerful Atlantic tropical storm, has devastated parts of the Caribbean and is now expected to have a significant impact on the East Coast of the United States the next few days. Here’s how funders can help. (Center for Disaster Philanthropy, 10/6)

– Philanthropy and Social Innovation in the Age of #BlackLivesMatter (Invested Impact, 10/3)

 – How Philanthropy Can Help Bridge America’s Political Divide (SSIR, 9/30)


Social Sector Job Openings
Director, Community Affairs – NCA | CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield
President & CEO | Delaware Grantmakers Association
Philanthropic Services Associate | The Community Foundation for the National Capital
Senior Program Manager, Community Benefits | Kaiser Permanente
Nonprofit Financial Planning and Analysis Manager | Arabella Advisors
Education Finance and Policy Analyst | DC Fiscal Policy Institute
Communications Director | Grantmakers In Health
Program Director | Grantmakers In Health
Analyst | Arabella Advisors
Grants Coordinator | City of Takoma Park

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to seder@washingtongrantmakers.org. 


So much to learn about the tunnels under Capitol Hill.

The (Almost) Daily will be back on Tuesday!

– Buffy

Some question expansion as summer youth jobs program begins

WORKFORCE/REGION
D.C.’s summer youth jobs program kicks off with 12,000 participants, including those who were made eligible due to the city raising the age limit from 21 to 24 in 2015. Meanwhile, officials grapple over data proving whether or not the age increase has proven to be a financially feasible move. (WaPo, 6/26)

If the program can’t prove that it helps its oldest participants find jobs that last beyond the summer, it stands to lose the millions of dollars needed to maintain the expansion that began last summer.

[…]

Unemployment rates for D.C. residents between age 20 and 24 are almost double the average rate in the city and even higher for young black people. About 1,000 men and women between the ages of 22 and 24 were accepted to the 2016 program, the maximum number allowed.

But the additional funding came with stipulations. The council agreed to permanently expand funding for the new age division only if the program could show that at least 35 percent of the 22-to-24-year-olds had full-time jobs after they completed the six-week program.

– Metro General Manager Paul J. Wiedefeld to eliminate 500 jobs (WaPo, 6/27)

HIV/AIDS | An interactive map providing a visualization of new HIV cases across the District has been released along with a new report by AIDSVu. The data used come from the city and the CDC, and show that D.C.’s ward 7 was hit the hardest with new HIV cases. (DCist, 6/23)

Related: Washington AIDS Partnership is at the forefront of efforts to “end HIV” in the city with a new program connecting black heterosexual women (the second-highest group of new HIV infections) to pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, and the soon-to-be released “90/90/90/50 by 2020” plan. (Daily, 6/20)

POVERTY/DISTRICT | WAMU presents a series exploring poverty this week, focusing today on the Greater Washington region and the underlying challenges its many social profit organizations face in aiding the poor. Residents and local leaders chime in on this interview, including president and CEO of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region Bruce McNamer, to discuss obstacles to combating poverty. (WAMU, 6/27)

EDUCATION | The D.C. government recently appealed a May ruling by the federal court that said the city is “providing inadequate services to young children with special needs who have yet to enter the school system.” (WaPo, 6/24)

COMMUNITY/REGION | Not far from the Greater Washington region, nearly 44 of West Virginia’s 55 counties have recently been hit hard by massive flooding. WRAG colleague organization Philanthropy West Virginia shares flood recovery response resources for those wishing to provide assistance.

LGBT | Gay Marriage in the United States, One Year Later (Atlantic, 6/26)

EQUITY | Many organizations and institutions are focusing their efforts around equity, but are they approaching equity…equitably? This blog post explores “meta-equity” and offers some suggestions for getting it right. (NWB, 6/27)


How much do you think it would cost to Uber across the country? This Fairfax filmmaker is about to find out

– Ciara

Friday roundup – June 13 through June 17, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG
– The Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation has made a $500,000 investment in Our Region, Your Investment. (Daily, 6/16)

– The Putting Racism on the Table learning series may be over, but the lessons will endure. In this blog post, Julie Wagner of CareFirst and Terri Copeland of PNC shared some of their deepest insights and major takeaways from the series. (Daily, 6/13)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– Natalie Wexler, trustee of the Omega Foundation, explained how schools can better teach kids to read. (Hint: it’s not by teaching reading comprehensive strategies.) (Daily, 6/14)

– Some Alexandria City Public School students are alleging  “excessive, discriminatory and reckless approach[es] to discipline” from the school system. The Kojo Nnamdi Show explores those claims and the supporting research behind the students’ argument. (WaPo, 6/3 and WAMU, 6/16)

THIS WEEK IN LGBT NEWS/THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
– The Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers will be co-hosting a national teleconference for funders on Wednesday, June 22 at 11:00 am ET, for funders concerned about the Orlando tragedy and how best they may respond. Register for the call co-hosted by ABFE, Funders for LGBTQ Issues, Change Philanthropy, AAPIP, and Hispanics in Philanthropy.

– WRAG’s colleague organization, the Florida Philanthropic Network, posted a list of resources for those who want to provide financial assistance to those affected by the mass shooting in Orlando.

Wells Fargo announced a donation of $300,000 toward victims and community recovery through the OneOrlando fund, set up by the City of Orlando and administered by the Central Florida Foundation.

– The Council on Foundations shared a resource guide created by Funders for LGBTQ Issues featuring Orlando’s local LGBTQ social profit organizations and fundraising efforts for victims.

– The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region has also shared resources for those who want to help.


JOBS

Senior Manager, Programs | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations | Deadline: 06/17/2016
Program Officer | Washington Area Women’s Foundation | Deadline: 06/19/2016
Associate | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Research Assistant | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Philanthropic Services Associate | The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
Grants Manager | The Norman & Ruth Rales Foundation
Community Impact Director | Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing
Senior Communication Consultant | Kaiser Permanente
Part Time Bookkeeper/Accountant | ACT for Alexandria
Associate Director | Arabella Advisors
Director, Corporate Philanthropy | Council on Foundations
D.C. PrEP for Women Project Coordinator | Washington AIDS Partnership
Visit WRAG’s Job Board for the latest job openings in the region’s social sector.

WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


This just may be the sweetest Internet search ever conducted.

– Ciara

New report closely examines racial and ethnic incarceration disparities in each state

MASS INCARCERATION/RACISM
A new report examines the rates of incarceration for whites, African Americans, and Hispanics state-by-state, finds three contributing factors to the racial and ethnic disparities in those rates, and makes some recommendations for reform. (Sentencing Project, 6/14)

Truly meaningful reforms to the criminal justice system cannot be accomplished without acknowledgement of racial and ethnic disparities in the prison system, and focused attention on reduction of disparities. Since the majority of people in prison are sentenced at the state level rather than the federal level, it is critical to understand the variation in racial and ethnic composition across states, and the policies and the day-to-day practices that contribute to this variance. Incarceration creates a host of collateral consequences that include restricted employment prospects, housing instability, family disruption, stigma, and disenfranchisement.

Related: In the most recently released video of WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series, James Bell, J.D., founder and executive director of the W. Haywood Burns Institute, discussed mass incarceration and how structural racism, white privilege, and implicit bias collide within the criminal justice system.

OUR REGION, YOUR INVESTMENT | Our Region, Your Investment is gaining traction with local investors, with a recent $500,000 investment from the Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation. Says Joshua Bernstein, president of the foundation (Daily, 6/16):

The Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation is working to address the deficit in housing affordability in the D.C. area. An investment in the Enterprise Community Impact Note aligns our investment strategy with our mission and leverages our impact.  We are grateful for the opportunity that Our Region, Your Investment has created to invest funds in ways that promote additional investment in housing solutions.

COMMUNITY/LGBT/PHILANTHROPY | Following the recent tragedy in Orlando, a number of WRAG members have organized efforts to provide support to victims and their families or share valuable resources with those serving LGBT communities. Wells Fargo has announced a donation of $300,000 toward victims and community recovery through the OneOrlando fund, set up by the City of Orlando and administered by the Central Florida Foundation. The Council on Foundations has shared a resource guide created by Funders for LGBTQ Issues featuring Orlando’s local LGBTQ social profit organizations and fundraising efforts for the victims, and the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region has also shared resources for those who want to help.

EDUCATION/DISCRIMINATION/VIRGINIA | Students at Alexandria’s public schools are bringing to light what they describe as “excessive, discriminatory and reckless approach[es] to discipline” from the school system. Today, The Kojo Nnamdi Show explores those claims and the research that supports their argument. (WaPo, 6/3 and WAMU, 6/16)

Related: On Thursday, July 7, the third installment of WRAG’s Public Education Speaker Series (supported by The Omega Foundation and the Tiger Woods Foundation) tackles the topic of racial and gender disparities in school discipline, with Professor Anne Gregory of Rutgers University. WRAG members can click here to register.

ARTS/CULTURE African American Museum prepares for ‘a mini-inauguration’ (WaPo, 6/15)

PUBLIC HEALTHGun Violence ‘A Public Health Crisis,’ American Medical Association Says (NPR, 6/14)


Going back to school is tough at any age, but imagine going back to the 10th grade at age 68! This grandfather shows us it’s never too late.

– Ciara

Six policy recommendations to preserve affordable housing in the District

HOUSING
D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser’s “Housing Preservation Strike Force” has released six new recommendations for preserving affordable housing units in the city to keep them accessible for lower-income residents (WCP, 6/13):

According to the mayor’s office, the strike force’s six recommendations are:

  • Establishing a preservation unit within a D.C. agency to identify specific affordable-housing opportunities, and to create a database of affordable-housing units
  • Funding a “public-private preservation fund” to “facilitate early investments in preservation deals”
  • Launching a program to renovate affordable housing in “small properties” of between five and 50 units
  • Drafting additional regulations for the District Opportunity to Purchase Act, which allows D.C. to purchase properties that risk losing their affordable-housing subsidies
  • Incentivizing residents and developers to take advantage of the Tenant Opportunity to Purchase Act through “predevelopment activities, legal services, third-party reports, acquisition bridge financing,” and data-collection
  • Creating programs designed to benefit seniors, such as “tenant-based vouchers or other rental assistance”

– The D.C. Department of Housing and Community Development has launched a new pilot program to preserve affordable housing in ward 8, as neighborhoods east-of-the river expect economic development over the next several years. (WCP, 6/10)

PUTTING RACISM ON THE TABLE | While the Putting Racism on the Table learning series has drawn to a close, the lessons learned will linger on in the minds of the attendees. In this blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland asks Julie Wagner of CareFirst and Terri Copeland of PNC to share their deepest insights and major takeaways from the full series. (Daily, 6/13)

EQUITY
– DC Fiscal Policy Institute discusses the importance of approving the Improving Access to Identity Documents Act that would allow District residents with incomes below 200 percent of poverty to obtain birth certificates, driver’s licenses, or ID cards at no charge. (DCFPI, 6/10)

– The Hell of Applying for Government Benefits (Atlantic, 6/12)

LGBT/DISCRIMINATION | In light of Sunday morning’s mass shooting in Orlando, The Atlantic takes a look at how, despite the advances in LGBT rights throughout the years, many still find themselves subject to violence at alarming rates. (Atlantic, 6/13)

PHILANTHROPY 
– Nonprofit Quarterly presents a two-part series authored by president of the F.B. Heron Foundation, Clara Miller, in which she discusses how they’ve worked to build a foundation that continues to evolve and engage with the larger economy. Check out part 1 and part 2. (NPQ, 6/8 and 6/9)

– Funding Infrastructure: A Smart Investment for All (SSIR, 6/10)

ECONOMYWhich U.S. Cities Suffer the Most During a Recession? (City Lab, 6/9)


Tonight is Game 5 of the NBA Finals. Which team are you rooting for? Can it be the Cavs? Please!?

– Ciara

New report examines Northern Virginia’s disparities in life expectancies

VIRGINIA/HEALTH
A new report from the Northern Virginia Health Foundation and the Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health looks at the disparities in life expectancy among Northern Virginia’s richest and poorest residents. While the area often tops rankings for happiness, health, etc, many residents are falling behind based on factors like education, income, and race. (WaPo, 6/7)

In Fairfax County alone, life expectancy ranges by as much as 10 years between western Lorton and eastern Lorton census tracts separated by four miles. In western Lorton, where the median household income is $133,413 and 12 percent of the population is black, the life expectancy is 89. In eastern Lorton, where the median income is $77,901 and 37 percent of residents are black, life expectancy drops to 79, according to the report.

[…]

“It’s about city planning, zoning and transportation issues,” said Patricia Mathews, the president of the health foundation.

Read the full report, A Study in Contrasts: Why Life Expectancy Varies in Northern Virginia.

HOUSING | In their Matters@Hand thought leadership series sponsored by Enterprise Community Partners, HAND shines a spotlight on the Roadmap for the Region’s Future Economy and efforts toward regional collaboration on affordable housing. (Helping Hands Blog, 6/6)

EDUCATION
– The U.S. Education Department has released the latest data from the Civil Rights Data Collection survey covering the 2013-2014 school year for more than 95,000 public schools. Check here for a quick glance at the numbers. (NPR, 6/7)

Related:  This data reveals deep racial inequities in the education system, including in how discipline is administered (for instance, that black preschoolers are 3.6 times more likely to be suspended than white preschoolers). Education funders are invited to join us for the next session in our Public Education Speaker Series on July 7, which will focus specifically on racial and gender disparities in school discipline and strategies for addressing them. More information can be found here.

Opinion: Two experts discuss how constant stress placed on children in poverty can take a toll on their mental and physical health, creating a need for better collaboration between schools and health providers. (WaPo, 6/6)

–  Homework Inequality: The Value of Having a Parent Around After School (Atlantic, 6/6)

WORKFORCE/LGBT | With more than 90 percent of transgender people experiencing some form of harassment in the workplace, the D.C. Office of Human Rights and the National LGBTQ Task Force have created a first-of-its-kind guide for employers for making work environments more accommodating. (WCP, 6/6)

SOCIAL PROFITS | The Center for Nonprofit Advancement is accepting nominations for the Gelman, Rosenberg & Freedman 2016 EXCEL Award until Friday, July 15, at 5:00 pm. The award recognizes outstanding leadership among Washington-area social profit organization chief executives.


Quiz time! How much do  you know about Africa?

– Ciara

Plans for Prince George’s Regional Medical Center may be scaled back

HEALTH
Amid concerns that the upcoming Prince George’s County Regional Medical Center project may be too large, regulators in Maryland are calling for some cutbacks. The center, originally expected to open in 2017, may open in 2020. (WBJ, 5/24)

[The] planned partnership for a new 231-bed teaching hospital at Largo Town Center is part of a larger redevelopment plan that county leaders say will transform health care for residents and revitalize nearby business. The hospital would replace Dimensions’ [Healthcare System’s] long-struggling flagship hospital, Prince George’s Hospital Center in Cheverly.

– In this interview, Chief Scientific Officer Diane Bovenkamp, Ph.D., of the BrightFocus Foundation discusses the science and therapeutic research they are funding to address Alzheimer’s disease. (Real World Health Care, 5/25)

– According to a new report from the United Health Foundation, comparing the current health status of those ages 50-64 with those of the same age in 1999, this next generation of senior citizens is expected to have more health concerns. The research has potentially serious implications on future health care costs for individuals and taxpayers overall. (NPR, 5/25)

PHILANTHROPY | In the latest installment of Exponent Philanthropy‘s Philanthropy Lessons video series, funders  discuss how philanthropy must bring value beyond dollars. (EP, May 2016)

LGBT/HOMELESSNESS | DC Shelters frustrated by lack of funding for LGBT homeless youth (Metro Weekly, 5/23)

EDUCATION/DISTRICT | A new analysis by the Urban Institute examines improvements in test scores by District students. Despite the gains, significant achievement gaps remain among D.C. students. (WCP, 5/24)

Related: Education funders are invited to the next session in WRAG’s 2016 public education speaker series, focused on the role of background knowledge in literacy. More details here.

DISTRICT/ECONOMY | Fans of interactive, at-a-glance data, rejoice! The DC Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning & Economic Development has released a new Ward Indicators Tool as part of their  Economic Intelligence Dashboard, to provide a source for finding demographic and investment data by ward. (Technical.ly, 5/23)


I don’t know about you, but I have officially run out of excuses for not wanting to go to the gym.

– Ciara

New county health rankings released

HEALTH
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has released their 2016 County Health Rankings and Roadmaps, measuring and ranking nearly all counties in the U.S. and “compiled using county-level measures from a variety of national and state data sources.” In Virginia, Loudoun County was number one in the overall ranking for health outcomes, and in Maryland, Montgomery County came out on top. (WTOP, 3/16)

The yearly report — released by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin’s Population Health Institute — evaluates 30 factors such as poverty, education, transportation, housing, violent crime, jobs and access to medical care.

The full rankings can be accessed here.

PHILANTHROPY
United Way of the National Capital Area has announced $100K to social profit organizations in Loudoun County. (Loudoun Times, 3/16)

– Funders for LGBTQ Issues has released a report tracking 2014 grantmaking from U.S. foundations. Open Society Foundations and Wells Fargo were among the top 10 funders for LGBTQ issues.

POVERTY/REGION | Opinion: Maryland and Virginia are headed toward reform in the way that the structured-settlement-purchasing industry preys on individuals who are often vulnerable to the lure of fast money through lump sum payments, despite standing to lose out on much of the funds awarded to them. Many of the cases involve victims who received settlements because they were exposed to lead poisoning. Advocates for the victims want to ensure that much-needed legislation is passed. (WaPo, 3/15)

DISTRICT New Bills Would Increase Access to D.C. Affordable Housing and Government Buildings (WCP, 3/15)

TRANSIT/REGIONWhy Washington’s transportation is a problem, in one map (GGW, 3/15)

JOBS 
Northrop Grumman is seeking a Manager of STEM Education Programs.

– The Baltimore Community Foundation is looking for the right candidate to fill their Program Officer position.


It’s that time of year again…check out this year’s entries for the Peeps Diorama contest!

– Ciara 

High cost of living biggest challenge facing millennials in the region today

REGION
A new report from American University explores some of the biggest challenges facing millennials in the region and how the area currently stacks up in tackling those issues. (WBJ, 1/13)

The “Greater Washington Index: Millennials” is not supposed to serve as a comprehensive survey but as business intelligence to craft policies and programs geared toward the millennial generation. Respondents were asked questions about the D.C. area related to transportation, crime, employment and nightlife, among other topics.

Overall, the report shows that D.C.-area millennials seem to be just as traffic-hating, salary-conscious, cost-of-living aware as any other generation. Just 9 percent of millennials surveyed described the area as an affordable place to live.

Click here to access the report, Greater Washington Index: Millennials.

IMMIGRATION | Amid recent news that the Department of Homeland Security would be ramping up deportation raids, advocates for undocumented immigrants and some local government officials are looking to ease fears of those who may be impacted. (DCist, 1/13)

HOUSING | Maryland’s foreclosure rate was among the highest in the U.S. in 2015 (WBJ, 1/14)

HOMELESSNESS/DISTRICT/LGBT | D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has announced $45,000 to Wanda Halston House and Supporting and Mentoring Youth Advocates and Leaders to invest in the fight against LGBTQ youth homelessness. In the District, more than 300 people under the age of 24 are thought to be homeless, with 43 percent self-identifying as LGBTQ, according to census data from last summer. (WCP, 1/13)

ARTS | Grantmakers in the Arts discusses how funders can and should support ALAANA (African, Latino(a), Asian, Arab and Native American) organizations and artists, and critiques a few of the recommendations from the recent DeVos Institute of Arts Management report on diversity in the arts. (GIA, 1/13)

YOUTH/EDUCATION
– Anacostia High School plans to open a new public safety academy this fall in a partnership with the Metropolitan Police Department and the DC Police Foundation. (ABC 7, 1/12)

–  Montgomery County Wants to Provide All Public School Students With Library Cards (Bethesda Magazine, 1/14)


Take a look at what is possibly the first-ever photograph of the White House taken 170 years ago.

– Ciara