Tag: immigration

Landmark education bill will reshape Maryland’s public school system

EDUCATION | A landmark education bill designed to reshape Maryland’s public school system will become law without Gov. Larry Hogan’s signature, and will send an additional $855 million to schools over the next two years. (WaPo, 5/15)

Over the next two years, the funding will pay for school-based health centers, grants for schools where at least 80 percent of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals, raises for teachers — the state will provide a 1.5 percent raise if the local district gives 3 percent — and grants to improve teacher standards.

The Maryland Commission on Innovation and Excellence, also known as the Kirwan Commission, was asked in 2016 to devise a plan to create a world-class school system in Maryland and ensure that all students, regardless of race and ethnicity, are “college- and career-ready” by 10th grade. The Kirwan Commission also was charged with coming up with funding formulas to pay for the plan, but the panel released its recommendations this year without a breakdown of how the state and local governments would share the costs.

IMMIGRATION | Between 75 and 150 adult adoptees in the District and up to 1,700 Virginians are at risk of being deported. (WAMU, 5/15)

RACIAL EQUITY/HEALTH
– An emergency Task Force on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health has been created by the Congressional Black Caucus to address access to mental health care and suicide among Black youth, including those who are LGBTQIA. (Washington Blade, 5/7)

Opioid Addiction Drug Going Mostly To Whites, Even As Black Death Rate Rises (NPR, 5/8)

CENSUS | Mayor Bowser officially kicked off the District’s 2020 Census efforts by presenting a proclamation to honor the selection of her Complete Count Committee.

CHILDREN/SAFETY | A Centers for Disease Control study has found that 1 in 14 public and charter high school students in DC has exchanged sex for something of value. Students who had been kicked out of their homes, run away or been abandoned were most likely to have exchanged sex.  (WAMU, 5/16)

HEALTHCARE | How safe are Greater Washington’s hospitals? Some earn top grades for quality and safety, and others don’t score as well. (WBJ, 5/16)

ARTS | Mayor Muriel Bowser Wants Big Changes for the City’s Arts Commission (CP, 5/16)

WOMEN/EQUALITY | June 4 marks the 100-year anniversary of Congress’ passage of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution, and there are a number of places around the Greater Washington region to learn the history of women’s suffrage. (WAMU, 5/16)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors – New!
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table – New!
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners – New!
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Communications, Technology, and Administration | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Architecture is like a tree … it grows and matures and branches out. I am part of that tree, of that movement, not starting, or ending, or following anything.” I.M. Pei has died at 102.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Thursday and Friday!

– Buffy

Fairfax County plans to invest millions to boost affordable housing

HOUSING
– Fairfax County officials are discussing new plans to strengthen investments in affordable housing programs in fiscal year 2020. They also plan to increase spending right now to $15 million to help developers pursue affordable housing projects, and to hire a new “housing in all policies coordinator” who will manage the county’s efforts. (WBJ, 4/29)

Those changes are merely the first stage of a broader effort to meet the recommendations of a task force studying the county’s housing needs. That group wants to see Fairfax add 5,000 new homes affordable to people making 60 percent or less of the area median income — that would apply to anyone making an annual salary of at least $46,350 — over the next 15 years. To meet that goal, the board is directing county staff to draft “innovative land use policies” to expand affordable housing projects, running the gamut from new density bonuses to more flexible parking requirements.

– As the number of families with multiple generations living under one roof is rising, home builders are focusing on extended families. (WAMU, 4/24)

Should cities subsidize housing for a family making $141,000? (WaPo, 4/29)

VIRGINIA | Amazon posts first jobs for HQ2, says project is ‘ahead of schedule’ (WaPo, 4/29)

LGBTQIA+/EDUCATION | The school boards in Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, and Arlington are supporting the rights of transgender students, weighing in on a case involving a teenager’s legal fight over his attempt to use the boys’ restroom at his high school. (WaPo, 4/29)

IMMIGRATION | Trump tightens asylum rules, will make immigrants pay fees to seek humanitarian refuge (WaPo, 4/30)

ENVIRONMENT | Global Inequality Is 25% Higher Due to Climate Instability (Truthout, 4/27)

HATE/JUSTICE | One day after Passover ended, an interfaith group gathered at the All Dulles Area Muslim Society to celebrate at an event that featured a moment of silence — and a continued resolve to counter hatred — after Saturday’s deadly shooting at a California synagogue. (WTOP, 4/29)

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS | Arlington plan for managing mass casualties is first in nation (WTOP, 4/29)

GUN VIOLENCE | Newtown Wasn’t an End for Gun Control. It Was a Beginning. (NYT, 4/29)

PHILANTHROPY | How Philanthropy Can Curb the Rise of Hate: Count It, Condemn it, Confront It (Chronicle, 4/29)


Interesting visual of 25 years of sprawl in Northern Virginia.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday!

– Buffy

Northern Virginia’s ranking of healthiest communities hides inequities

HEALTH/EQUITY
Op-ed: Northern Virginia’s recent health rankings mask big disparities, argues Patricia Mathews, president and CEO of the Northern Virginia Health Foundation (and former chair of WRAG’s board). She calls on leaders to reverse decades of disinvestment by using census tract-level data to focus interventions and investments on those areas with the most marginalized communities. (WaPo, 4/19)

Every March, a national study comes out showing that Northern Virginia is home to the healthiest counties in Virginia… Northern Virginia should be proud of our overall health and well-being — but also well-informed about what’s missing from the county health rankings story. The rankings are based on averages that mask tremendous disparities in Northern Virginia. And if you dig deeper, census tract data paint a stark picture of Northern Virginia’s 15 “islands of disadvantage” — clusters of places where residents face multiple health challenges, including poverty, less education, unaffordable housing and a lack of health insurance.

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS
Op-ed: DC’s homeless encampment ‘cleanups’ are only making things worse (WaPo, 4/19)

– A proposed HUD policy that would eject immigrant families from public housing to make room for what it calls the “most vulnerable” is being fought by housing advocates. (CityLab, 4/19)

CENSUS 2020 | The Supreme Court heard arguments about the proposed citizenship question on the 2020 Census yesterday. Here’s a run-down of what happened. (WaPo, 4/23)

CHILD CARE | For Families Who Need Them Most, Child Care Subsidies Haven’t Always Helped (WAMU, 4/23)

GREATER DC REGION | The mass exodus from Greater Washington continues. And it got worse last year. (WBJ, 4/23)

IMMIGRATION | Some asylum-seekers currently detained by ICE have initiated several hunger strikes, demanding release as their cases are adjudicated. (NPR, 4/19)

TRANSPORTATION
– Metro is putting $65 million toward sustainability efforts. (Curbed, 4/22)

Arlington County to encourage biking with safer bike paths, more riding options (WTOP, 4/24)


As we continue to celebrate Earth Day this week, here’s a list of 101 ways to fight climate change

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Fairfax County may help undocumented immigrants fight deportation

IMMIGRATION | A publicly-funded legal defense fund for immigrants caught in deportation proceedings is under consideration in Fairfax County. This program would be part of a growing effort by local governments to counter the current administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants. (WaPo, 4/10)

Advocates argue that a proposed $200,000 pilot program aimed at assisting low-income immigrants — both undocumented and those in the country legally — would send a strong message that the county does not agree with the spike in immigration arrests that has spread fear in local communities.“ Fairfax has an opportunity to be a regional leader in ensuring that its immigrant residents have access to due process in our nation’s immigration courts,” said immigration consultant Jose Magaña-Salgado.

WRAG | Time flies. In a final blog post before her retirement from WRAG, Tamara Lucas Copeland reflects on her 12 years leading the organization. (Daily, 4/11)

Related: Two local organizations are honoring Tamara’s leadership at upcoming events. On April 29th, Fair Chance is naming Tamara as their 2019 Community Champion. And, the Nonprofit Village is recognizing Tamara with the Chairman’s Award on May 3rd.

HOUSING | DC’s Attorney General is going after bad landlords, and housing advocates are happy to see it. (WAMU, 4/8)

DC/GENTRIFICATION | After the community mobilized around #DontMuteDC, go-go is back at the Metro PCS store in Shaw. The store had turned off the music, which has been a mainstay on that corner for years, after residents in a new development complained. (WAMU, 4/10)

EDUCATION/CHILDCARE
– The Maryland General Assembly approved a two-year, $700-million boost in funding for the state’s public schools, some of which will be used for free pre-K programs across the state. (WAMU, 4/9)

– Families in the Greater DC region are on the hunt for affordable child care. (WAMU, 4/8)

EQUITY
– Opinion: The need to teach our children about the dangers of hate-laced speech against Muslims (WaPo, 4/9)

Supreme Court Says Discrimination Is OK — If You’re a Muslim (Truthout, 4/7)

PHILANTHROPY
Greater Good: Lessons from Those Who Have Started Major Grantmaking Organizations (CEP, 4/10)

– The Kresge Foundation has announced that a quarter of its US assets will be invested with firms owned by people of color or women by 2025. The decision is based on equity, opportunity, and returns. (Chronicle, 4/4)


Books that spark joy!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Review finds hundreds of Fairfax students with special needs secluded and restrained

EDUCATION/DISABILITY RIGHTS | Fairfax County Public Schools officials have reported thousands of incidents of students with special needs being isolated or physically restrained. The preliminary findings of a recent review found 1,679 incidents affecting 203 students in the 2017-18 school year. (WAMU, 4/3)

Nationally, the available federal data shows that the use of seclusion and restraint is rare, but students with disabilities disproportionately experiencing the majority of cases. In Fairfax, district guidelines prohibit seclusion “unless there is a dangerous situation and seclusion/restraint is necessary to protect the student or another person or persons” …  “The board is confronting a problematic history here where there is an appearance that things have been swept under the rug,” said at-large school board member Ryan McElveen … “We are not going to move forward without a full investigation. This board is going to get to the bottom as to why this has occurred.”

IMMIGRATION/EQUITY | Tatiana Torres, a CSR regional director, shares her story about growing up undocumented on the Consumer Health Foundation blog. (CHF, 4/3)

HOUSING | A Maryland General Assembly bill that would have required landlords to give a reason for evicting a tenant was voted down. (Bethesda Magazine, 3/29)

DISTRICT | A bill has been introduced to the DC Council to build eight new statues, one in each ward, of accomplished women and people of color who were born and raised in DC. (WAMU, 4/2)

PHILANTHROPY/EQUITY | Opinion: Real Equity Means Including People With Disabilities in Philanthropy (Chronicle, 4/1)

WORKFORCE/EQUALITY | America has stalled on equal pay, and women of color face the biggest gap. (Vox, 4/2)

ENVIRONMENT | The Tidal Basin is deteriorating because of climate change and tourism. (WaPo, 4/3)

HEALTH | Maryland legislature agrees to raise minimum smoking age to 21 (WaPo, 4/3)


Remembering Marvin Gaye 35 years after his death.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

New report links dollar stores to economic distress for people of color

RACE/POVERTY | New research from a nonprofit advocacy group links a lack of grocery stores to the presence of dollar stores in high-poverty neighborhoods with a higher percentage of residents of color. According to the report, there is growing evidence that these dollar stores are causing economic distress for the neighborhoods in which they reside. (WAMU, 2/19)

The Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR) reports that dollar stores can be found in Northeast and Southeast DC and in Prince George’s County and are chipping away at the profitability of local grocers and retail outlets and then taking advantage of the void left by the departure of those stores.

“When you look at the maps of the share of residents who are African American, it just jumps right out,” said Stacy Mitchell, co-director of ILSR and the co-author of the report. It looked at the national impact of the discount chains and revealed that as the number of dollar stores increase, shoppers who frequent them continue to struggle financially.

FOOD INSECURITY
– A program at Food & Friends is working to combat food insecurity and negative health outcomes for expectant mothers by providing healthy, hearty meals. (WTOP, 2/20)

– How often fruits and vegetables are depicted on billboards depends on who you are and where you live. (WaPo, 2/19)

ENVIRONMENT | Environmentalists are fighting a solar panel project that would help Georgetown University dramatically reduce its greenhouse gas emissions because the development needed to do it would put tributaries to the Chesapeake Bay at risk. (WaPo, 2/17)

EDUCATION
– The ACLU of Maryland is pushing for passage of a bill that would allow private schools to be sued over alleged discrimination, an option that now exists only for public schools under Maryland law. (WaPo, 2/18)

Study Explores Link Between Health, School Absenteeism (Prince George’s Sentinel, 2/13)

PHILANTHROPY
– Five pioneering black women philanthropists who paved the way for women today.  (PushBlack Now, 2/20)

 – Opinion: Trump’s Emergency Declaration Threatens Philanthropy’s Core Values (Chronicle, 2/18)


Yikes, are we really that bad? Stay off the roads and enjoy the snow today! 

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Those experiencing homelessness more vulnerable to violent crime

HOMELESSNESS | In a new report, the National Coalition for the Homeless documents that those experiencing homelessness are more likely to be victims of violent crime than the general population, arguing that the dehumanization they experience leads to their marginalization and leaves them unprotected. (GG Washington, 2/5)

In their latest report, “Vulnerable to Hate: A Survey of Bias-Motivated Violence against People Experiencing Homelessness in 2016-2017,” the NCH documented at least 112 anti-homeless attacks that occurred in the United States in 2016 and 2017 and analyzed 1,769 reported acts of violence committed against people experiencing homeless from 1999-2017. Of the 1,769 violent acts, 476 victims lost their lives as a result.

RACIAL EQUITY
– In her latest blog post, WRAG’s managing director of corporate strategy, Katy Moore, reflects on the significance of the racist photo from Governor Northam’s yearbook page, and the relationship between racist imagery and the deep racial inequities that underlie our social systems. (Daily, 2/7)

– During Black History Month, DC educators embrace Black Lives Matter week, and tackle a challenging and sensitive topic: how to talk about race with young students. (DC Line, 2/4)

PHILANTHROPY |  “Why we give – The need to connect and belong,”  – TedX Talk by Community Foundation for Northern Virginia‘s President and CEO, Eileen Ellsworth.

IMMIGRATION | DC Mayor Bowser has awarded the National Immigration Forum a $100,000 grant to support city employees and residents who are trying to become U.S. citizens. (WaPo, 2/4)

LGBTQIA/EQUITY | Gender-neutral bathrooms benefit a lot of people. Our region needs more of them. (GG Washington, 2/6)

HOUSING | A bill was introduced this week to revoke the DC Housing Authority’s status as an independent agency and fold it into the purview of the Office of the Mayor. (City Paper, 2/5)

HEALTH | A smoking ban currently in place in Rockville and Gaithersburg could soon cover all of Montgomery County. (WTOP, 2/6)

CRIMINAL JUSTICE
– The U.S. Attorney for DC has announced a strategy to prosecute some gun-related crimes in federal court, rather than DC Superior Court. According to the ACLU, this would contribute to mass incarceration. (WaPo, 2/6)

– DC officials are putting an additional $6 million toward violence prevention and jobs training programs in light of the recent increase in violence across the city. (DC Line, 2/2)

COMMUNITY | BB&T and SunTrust are set to combine in a $66B deal that will result in the third largest bank in the DC area by market share (WBJ, 2/7)

SHUTDOWN | DC Is Preparing For The Possibility Of Another Shutdown (WAMU, 2/5)

VIRGINIA | Northern Virginia lawmakers are welcoming Amazon to the region. (DCist, 2/5)


The Oscars won’t have a host this year – the first time since 1989 when Rob Lowe danced with Snow White in an opening number that is now considered the most cringe-worthy moment in awards-show history.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back tomorrow!

– Buffy

South Arlington residents worry about Amazon’s impact

BUSINESS | Many in Virginia are excited to be the location of Amazon’s second headquarters, but some residents in South Arlington, a multi-ethnic area south of U.S. Route 50, are worried that it will cause rising rents and displacement. (Curbed, 12/13)

…some urban policy experts say South Arlington may see adverse effects from HQ2, such as an increase in income inequality and gentrification.

“You’d expect the biggest impacts of Amazon to be in easy commuting distance, and South Arlington is a prime target for that,” says Jenny Schuetz, a fellow in the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program. “A lot of these neighborhoods are likely to be pretty vulnerable because they have a lot of older apartment buildings, garden apartments, and older single-family houses that aren’t in great shape.”

PHILANTHROPY | Joi Ridley, director of communications at Grantmakers for Effective Organizations, discusses how grantmakers can evaluate their capacity-building support to make it fit the needs of its grantee partners. (CEP, 12/13)

HIV/AIDS | Here’s a look at why HIV/AIDS funding is declining globally and across the US. (Inside Philanthropy, 12/12)

IMMIGRATION
– These grandmothers created the Overground Railroad, a caravan of activists grandmothers that travel to meet asylum seekers once they are released from detention to give them food and other comfort. (YES! Magazine, 12/17)

– LGBTQ caravan migrants may have to ‘prove’ their gender or sexual identity at US border (The Conversation, 11/30)

ENVIRONMENT | Until We Confront Capitalism, We Will Not Solve the Climate Crisis (Truthout, 12/16)


REMINDER | Daily WRAG readers, we want your opinion! In order to improve your reading experience, we ask that you complete this short survey by Wednesday, December 19 to let us know what you like and what could be better on the blog.


A poem for the arts in Arlington.

– Kendra

How these queer youth became entrepreneurs

LGBTQIA/BUSINESS | Last month, a local nonprofit, Supporting and Mentoring Youth Advocates and Leaders, hosted a panel discussion with four LGBTQIA youth who have experienced homelessness. The youth cited challenges they experienced, but also talked about how they became entrepreneurs. (GGWash, 12/12)

Unsurprisingly, employment opportunities are frequently among the highest-ranked needs homeless LGBTQ youth report. Panelists said the work they find is often part-time and isn’t sustainable. Chris noted that workplaces can be unwelcoming to LGBTQ people, and that they have experienced prejudice on the job, both intentional and unintentional.

Panelists created small businesses to supplement their income and, in some cases, to feel comfortable being at work. Some of their enterprises include house cleaning, catering, jewelry making, and makeup design.

PHILANTHROPY | Tenneh Kemah, a  WRAG/UMD Philanthropy Fellow with The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation and a student in UMD’s Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management and Leadership program, discusses how her experience with the foundation is helping her gain valuable skills for her work at her own organization. (Daily, 12/13)

IMMIGRATION | This is what sanctuary means for a woman who is undocumented in Virginia. (WaPo, 12/12)

ENVIRONMENT | Big company, big dollars, small community: Dominion deal sparks dissent in community facing gas project (WaPo, 12/9)

WORKFORCE | A D.C. Superior Court judge has ruled that elections officials failed to follow proper procedure when they allowed supporters of the Initiative 77 referendum to collect signatures. (WAMU, 12/12)

PUBLIC SAFETY | Prince George’s County Police Officers of Color File Racial Discrimination Lawsuit (WAMU, 12/12)

TRANSIT | A few weeks ago, the DC Council voted to decriminalize fare evasion, which would stop the targeted arrests of youth of color and Black men. This week, the Northern Virginia Transportation Commission wrote a letter to DC’s mayor expressing its disappointment with the passing of the legislation. (InsideNOVA, 12/12)

HOUSING | Arlington County has released a new report analyzing the progress of its affordable housing master plan. The report found that although it was able to create or preserve 515 homes guaranteed to remain affordable to low-income renters this year, the number is short of the county’s goal. (ARLnow, 12/12)


REMINDER | Daily WRAG readers, we want your opinion! In order to improve your reading experience, we ask that you complete this short survey by Wednesday, December 19 to let us know what you like and what could be better on the blog.


Would a robot take your job? Find out here.

– Kendra