Tag: homelessness

Next steps for the District’s ambitious clean energy law

SUSTAINABILITY | The Clean Energy Act DC passed in January of 2019, and climate activists are now focused on how the law will be implemented, and funded to ensure that it will benefit all residents. (GGWash, 5/8)

The Clean Energy Act DC aims to transition the District to run on 100% renewable electricity by 2032, making it the country’s most ambitious renewable electricity standard … the law also aims to reduce carbon emissions by 50% by 2032. Activists and experts say it’s important to pay attention to how the law is implemented and funded and that scrutiny is needed regarding equity and accountability regarding the main components of the Clean Energy Act: the Sustainable Energy Trust Fund (SETF), the Building Energy Performance Standard (BEPS), Transportation Emissions, and in particular, the Green Bank.

HOUSING | The Washington Housing Initiative has announced its first Impact Pool closing, where investors – leading local developers and banking institutions, including JBG SMITH, Bank of America, PNC Bank, SunTrust, JPMorgan Chase, BB&T, United Bank,Wells Fargo, Bernstein Management, Buchanan Partners, and Bob Buchanan – have committed more than $78 million to support the creation and preservation of affordable workforce housing across the region. (Yahoo Finance, 5/8)

RACIAL EQUITY/PHILANTHROPY | The Consumer Health Foundation not only incorporates racial equity into their grantmaking, but intentionally recruits people most impacted by structural racism onto their board of trustees to deploy those resources. (CHF, 5/7)

HOMELESSNESS | Data from Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments finds that the number of people in Arlington County experiencing homelessness has decreased. (ARLNow, 5/6)

GENTRIFICATION/DC | Go-go’s fight against gentrification is just getting started. This is what it sounds like. (WaPo, 5/8)

ENVIRONMENT | The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments released a report yesterday that says the waters of the Potomac River are getting cleaner but there’s still more work to do. (WTOP, 5/8)

PUBLIC SAFETY | New bills are trying to make District streets safer. (dcist, 5/8)

INCLUSION | How One Non-Muslim Is Working To Make Restaurants More Inclusive During Ramadan (WAMU, 5/8)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington – New!
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter – New!
Director of Communications, Technology, and Administration | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


A picture says a thousand words – 24 magazine covers about climate change

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday!

– Buffy

Northern Virginia’s ranking of healthiest communities hides inequities

HEALTH/EQUITY
Op-ed: Northern Virginia’s recent health rankings mask big disparities, argues Patricia Mathews, president and CEO of the Northern Virginia Health Foundation (and former chair of WRAG’s board). She calls on leaders to reverse decades of disinvestment by using census tract-level data to focus interventions and investments on those areas with the most marginalized communities. (WaPo, 4/19)

Every March, a national study comes out showing that Northern Virginia is home to the healthiest counties in Virginia… Northern Virginia should be proud of our overall health and well-being — but also well-informed about what’s missing from the county health rankings story. The rankings are based on averages that mask tremendous disparities in Northern Virginia. And if you dig deeper, census tract data paint a stark picture of Northern Virginia’s 15 “islands of disadvantage” — clusters of places where residents face multiple health challenges, including poverty, less education, unaffordable housing and a lack of health insurance.

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS
Op-ed: DC’s homeless encampment ‘cleanups’ are only making things worse (WaPo, 4/19)

– A proposed HUD policy that would eject immigrant families from public housing to make room for what it calls the “most vulnerable” is being fought by housing advocates. (CityLab, 4/19)

CENSUS 2020 | The Supreme Court heard arguments about the proposed citizenship question on the 2020 Census yesterday. Here’s a run-down of what happened. (WaPo, 4/23)

CHILD CARE | For Families Who Need Them Most, Child Care Subsidies Haven’t Always Helped (WAMU, 4/23)

GREATER DC REGION | The mass exodus from Greater Washington continues. And it got worse last year. (WBJ, 4/23)

IMMIGRATION | Some asylum-seekers currently detained by ICE have initiated several hunger strikes, demanding release as their cases are adjudicated. (NPR, 4/19)

TRANSPORTATION
– Metro is putting $65 million toward sustainability efforts. (Curbed, 4/22)

Arlington County to encourage biking with safer bike paths, more riding options (WTOP, 4/24)


As we continue to celebrate Earth Day this week, here’s a list of 101 ways to fight climate change

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Montgomery County sees significant increase in the number of uninsured children seeking health care

HEALTH | According to the Montgomery County’s Department of Health and Human Services, for the first time there is a significant increase in the number of uninsured children seeking health care in the county. The increase may be linked to an increasing number of immigrant children released from detention centers earlier this year. (WAMU, 4/16)

While new immigrant children are seeking more health care services, the broader relationship between immigrants and social services in Montgomery County is more complicated … the fear of deportation is limiting the uptake of certain benefits and services. Even with the uptake in requests for services … “there is now clear evidence of families who are reluctant to access those services for fear that it will impact their applications for long-term status here in the country,” said County Council member Gabe Albornoz. According to the Pew Research Center, 425,000 unauthorized migrants lived in the Washington Metropolitan Area in 2016.

CENSUS 2020 | Last week, the United Philanthropy Forum joined a number of foundations and other philanthropy-serving organizations in signing an amicus curiae brief to the Supreme Court. The brief discussed the ways in which philanthropy relies on census data and made the case to uphold the lower courts’ rulings to set aside the citizenship question from the 2020 Census. (Forum, 4/4)

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS
Despite Housing Crunch, Montgomery County Expected To Freeze New Development (WAMU, 4/16)

– The recently opened Downtown Day Services Center offers many services, including a clean shower and laundry, to those experiencing homelessness. (WaPo, 4/15)

EMANCIPATION DAY | As DC commemorated Emancipation Day yesterday, the DC Fiscal Policy Institute recognizes the District’s important position as the first place where enslaved Black people were freed by federal action, and highlights the long history of institutional policies that maintained racial inequities, with impacts that continue to this day. (DCFPI, 4/16)

ARTS/CULTURE | Cities across the country, including DC, are drafting documents to help protect their cultural resources from economic changes — but do they really help cities save their art and music scenes?  (CityLab, 4/10)

DISTRICT
Tragedy At Notre Dame Might Accelerate Fire Safety Work Underway At National Cathedral (dcist, 4/15)

– Capital Bikeshare is removing electric bikes from its fleet after receiving  complaints that the front wheels aren’t working well. (WaPo, 4/14)

PHILANTHROPY As We Wait for Attorney General Barr to Release the Mueller Report, What Foundations Should Do (Chronicle, 4/11 – Subscription)


City Paper has a Peeps diorama contest – vote for your favorite!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday!

– Buffy

DC to open new middle school in growing Northwest neighborhood

EDUCATION
– In recent years District leaders closed more than a dozen schools because of low enrollment, but now a new middle school underscores the city’s strategy for retaining students in neighborhood schools. (WaPo, 3/26)

…A booming corner of the city is getting its second new middle school in recent years. The opening of the campus in Northwest reflects a strategy to bolster middle schools so families will stick around to attend public high schools.

The arrival of the campus in Takoma — the school, adjacent to Coolidge High, is part of a broader $150 million overhaul of the Coolidge campus — comes as middle schools and high schools in other neighborhoods sit with ample vacant seats.

In the Takoma, Brightwood and Manor Park neighborhoods, city leaders saw an opportunity for growth. The school system studied population trends with the D.C. Office of Planning and determined that the cluster of neighborhoods is poised for one of the biggest population growths in the city over the next seven years, bolstered by the arrival of immigrant and young affluent families.

Arlington Public Schools Developing an Implementation Plan for Transgender Non-Discrimination Policy (ARLNow, 3/27)

VIRGINIA/RACE | Virginia Governor Ralph Northam amended two motorist measures in the state budget with ‘race inequities’ in mind. (WaPo, 3/26)

HOUSING 
Mayor’s budget proposes slight increase for DC police, more money for programs that treat violence as health issue (WaPo, 3/26)

– According to a new report, the “vast majority” of dollars raised by DC elected officials through private donations to help District residents are not spent as intended. (WaPo, 3/26)

HOMELESSNESS | Employed full-time and experiencing homelessness in the Washington region: the changing face of homelessness. (WaPo, 3/22)

GUN VIOLENCE | Bump Stock Ban Takes Effect As Gun Rights Groups Ask Supreme Court For Delay (NPR, 3/26)

PUBLIC SAFETY | DC Police Reported A 20 Percent Increase In Use-Of-Force Incidents Last Year (dcist, 3/25)

GENDER | Teen boys rated their female classmates based on looks. The girls fought back. (WaPo, 3/26)

PHILANTHROPY | The Sweetness of Circles highlights the history, strength and growth of black-led giving circles. (Medium, 3/25)


How to cycle, drink, and cruise down the Potomac!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday this week!

– Buffy

Study finds over 20,000 Black DC residents displaced between 2000 and 2013

HOUSING/RACIAL EQUITY
– According to a just-released study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, approximately 40 percent of the District’s lower-income neighborhoods experienced gentrification between 2000 and 2013. The city also saw the most African American residents displaced from their neighborhoods during that time, giving DC the greatest “intensity of gentrification” of any city in the country. (WaPo, 3/19)

More than 20,000 residents were displaced from their neighborhoods by mostly affluent, white newcomers, which is part of the intensity ranking, where “you feel it and you see it,” said Jesse Van Tol, chief executive of the NCRC, a research and advocacy coalition of 600 community organizations that promote economic and racial justice. “It’s the visibility and the pace of it.”

– DC families living in public housing face ongoing health issues. (CP, 3/20)

HOMELESSNESS | Victims of domestic violence are particularly vulnerable to homelessness. (WaPo, 3/30)

VIRGINIA | Opinion: Don’t underestimate Amazon HQ2’s importance (WBJ, 3/21)

CHILD CARE | Mayor Bowser has proposed building three new early education centers for kids aged four, which could create more than 500 new openings. (WAMU, 3/21)

GENDER/EQUITY | The National Museum of Women in the Arts will host its annual Art+Feminism edit-a-thon to improve Wikipedia entries about notable women artists to help improve the site’s gender imbalance. (WAMU, 3/22)

EDUCATION | This school in the District had a high pregnancy rate, so it opened a day care for students, which helped to decrease pregnancies and increase its graduation rate. (EdSurge, 3/15)

COMMUNITY | The Greater Washington Good Business Awards ​ is accepting applications through Friday, April 5.

PHILANTHROPY/RACE | The recently released study, Women Give 2019: Gender and Giving Across Communities of Color, found that race has little impact on giving. (Chronicle, 3/19 – Subscription)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Program Specialist | Jack and Jill Foundation – New!
Program Manager | Weissberg Foundation – New!
Director of Development Partnerships – New England | League of Conservation Voters – New!
Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation
Grants Management Associate | Wellspring Philanthropic Fund
Program Manager | DC127
Development Manager  | DC127
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase
Northern Virginia Community Affairs Liaison | CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
Programs Officer | DC Bar Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


How is your March Madness bracket looking this morning? Catch all the fun today online!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday next week!

– Buffy

Housing Leaders Group of Greater Washington launches initiative to secure $1 billion toward affordable housing

HOUSING | The Housing Leaders Group of Greater Washington, which WRAG co-convenes along with Enterprise Community Partners, Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, the Greater Washington Community Foundation, and Citi Community Development, has announced the Capital Region Housing Challenge. The initiative encourages employers, anchor institutions, philanthropy, private investors, and local and state governments to commit by the end of 2020 at least $500 million in new private capital and $500 million in new public funds toward affordable apartments and home ownership.

“The Capital Region Housing Challenge is a down payment toward the investments needed to truly solve the region’s housing needs, especially for lower income residents,” said David Bowers, Enterprise Community Partners Vice President and Mid Atlantic Market Leader and HLG Co‐Convener. “By working in partnership with other regional efforts and stakeholders, we are committed to promote the value of, and opportunities to, invest $1 billion in new capital by the end of 2020.”

WRAG’s vice president Gretchen Greiner-Lott says, “WRAG is excited to support the Housing Leaders Group and this Capital Regional Housing Challenge. We trust this challenge will encourage and energize everyone to plug in where they can to support housing affordability across the region.”

Click here to read a fact sheet about the Capital Region Housing Challenge.

WRAG | After 11.5 years at WRAG, today is Katy Moore’s last day at the organization. In her final blog post, she reflects back on her career thus far in philanthropy, what she’s learned, and where she sees the field heading in the future. (Daily, 3/20)

DISABILITY RIGHTS | The Smithsonian Debuts New Accessibility Technology For Blind and Low-Vision Patrons (CP, 3/15)

WORKFORCE | JPMorgan Chase is investing $350 million to get workers ready for the future (CNN, 3/19)

REGION | New consortium sets vision for Washington region to be national leader in finding digital solutions to problems (WaPo, 3/19)

POVERTY | Millennial women are more likely than GenXers to live below the poverty line. The newly released report, CLIPPED WINGS, reveals the current economic reality for millennial women and the primary drivers contributing to the wealth inequities they experience. (Asset Funders Network, 3/19)

EDUCATION | Fairfax County Public Schools are launching “a complete and thorough evaluation and review” into their seclusion and restraint practices following the revelation of hundreds of unreported cases. (WAMU, 3/15)

COMMUNITY | Kim R. Ford has been named the new CEO of Martha’s Table. (WBJ, 3/18)

PHILANTHROPY | Behind a $25 Million Plan to Elevate Women in STEM and Use their Stories to Inspire Girls (Inside Philanthropy, 3/15)


It’s the first day of Spring and the first day of the Cherry Blossom Festival!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Virginia racial gerrymandering case headed to the Supreme Court

RACIAL JUSTICE | Today the US Supreme Court will hear arguments in Virginia’s racial gerrymandering redistricting case, which could determine the balance of power in the state’s legislature for years. (WaPo, 3/17)

A panel of lower-court judges ruled last year that 11 Virginia House of Delegates districts were racially gerrymandered and ordered a new map to correct them. House Republicans appealed that finding and will argue against the new map before the high court. All 140 seats in the legislature are on the ballot this fall. The party that controls the General Assembly in 2021 will oversee the next statewide re­districting effort, following next year’s census — potentially cementing an advantage in future elections.

– Virginia is confronting its dark past and seeking to document as many lynching cases as possible, including three in Loudoun County that are expected to be memorialized by a historical marker in the future. (Loudoun County Times, 3/16)

HOMELESSNESS
DC Central Kitchen, which serves 10,000 meals per day to homeless shelters, is facing financial turbulence after losing a major portion of a long-standing contract. (CP, 3/14)

– The District’s new Downtown Services Center in the basement of the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church is a new space that provides many services for people experiencing homelessness, from access to healthcare to a barber shop. (WTOP, 3/14)

EDUCATION | DC’s Free Preschool Program Turns 10. How It’s Changed Family Life In The District (WAMU, 3/15)

CHILD CARE | Arlington votes to adopt changes to improve child care access. (arlingtonva.us, 3/16)

MENTAL HEALTH | Mental health problems rise significantly among young Americans (WaPo, 3/16)

DISABILITY RIGHTS | Why The College Admissions Scandal Hurts Students With Disabilities (NPR, 3/14)

ENVIRONMENT | How a 7th-grader’s strike against climate change exploded into a movement (WaPo, 23/16)


Did you know this about St. Patrick’s Day? Sláinte!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

DC’s top education leaders trained to merge business concepts with equity in public education

EDUCATION/EQUITY | DC’s top three educational leaders – state superintendent Hanseul Kang, deputy mayor of education Paul Kihn, and acting schools chancellor Lewis Ferebee – have all studied at the Broad Center for the Management of School Systems, an educational leadership program that promotes a business perspective in the management of urban public school districts that has a focus on equity. Those who support the training program say it offers a unique corporate-like training experience, while critics say the teachings encourage school leaders to undermine democratic control of public education. (WAMU, 2/19)

Ferebee says it’s possible to merge these business concepts with equity in public education. “When you are studying leadership and change theory, there is a lot that you can learn from the business sector, and we obviously take advantage of that. [But] it’s not limited to business principles. Maximizing resources is obviously a part of the business community. Often times it is how you impact your bottom line. Maximizing your resources is also one way to address equity, ensuring that you get the most out of the public dollars you have access to.”

CENSUS | Communities of color and immigrants are at particular risk of being undercounted in the 2020 Census and the Virginia Legislature has recently stripped funds for Census outreach. (Commonwealth Institute, 2/14)

RACE | According to a just-released Goucher College poll, a majority of Maryland residents think race relations in the state have worsened in recent years. (WaPo, 2/18)

HEALTH | In honor of Presidents Day, the de Beaumont Foundation has released a quiz with interesting facts about US presidents and how their policy, advocacy, and private lives have influenced Americans’ health.

HOMELESSNESS | A challenge to Virginia’s ‘habitual drunkard’ law argues that it targets homeless people. (WaPo, 2/18)

WORKFORCE | A proposed bill currently being considered in Annapolis would phase out lower wages paid to tipped workers. (WAMU, 2/8)

ENVIRONMENT | If we don’t address climate change, DC weather will feel more like Mississippi in the next 60 years. (WAMU, 2/15)

NONPROFITS | Sometimes the best thing we donors can do to advance social justice is to just write the check and get out of the way (Nonprofit AF, 2/18)


Marylanders love our Old Bay – do you know what’s in it?

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

Those experiencing homelessness more vulnerable to violent crime

HOMELESSNESS | In a new report, the National Coalition for the Homeless documents that those experiencing homelessness are more likely to be victims of violent crime than the general population, arguing that the dehumanization they experience leads to their marginalization and leaves them unprotected. (GG Washington, 2/5)

In their latest report, “Vulnerable to Hate: A Survey of Bias-Motivated Violence against People Experiencing Homelessness in 2016-2017,” the NCH documented at least 112 anti-homeless attacks that occurred in the United States in 2016 and 2017 and analyzed 1,769 reported acts of violence committed against people experiencing homeless from 1999-2017. Of the 1,769 violent acts, 476 victims lost their lives as a result.

RACIAL EQUITY
– In her latest blog post, WRAG’s managing director of corporate strategy, Katy Moore, reflects on the significance of the racist photo from Governor Northam’s yearbook page, and the relationship between racist imagery and the deep racial inequities that underlie our social systems. (Daily, 2/7)

– During Black History Month, DC educators embrace Black Lives Matter week, and tackle a challenging and sensitive topic: how to talk about race with young students. (DC Line, 2/4)

PHILANTHROPY |  “Why we give – The need to connect and belong,”  – TedX Talk by Community Foundation for Northern Virginia‘s President and CEO, Eileen Ellsworth.

IMMIGRATION | DC Mayor Bowser has awarded the National Immigration Forum a $100,000 grant to support city employees and residents who are trying to become U.S. citizens. (WaPo, 2/4)

LGBTQIA/EQUITY | Gender-neutral bathrooms benefit a lot of people. Our region needs more of them. (GG Washington, 2/6)

HOUSING | A bill was introduced this week to revoke the DC Housing Authority’s status as an independent agency and fold it into the purview of the Office of the Mayor. (City Paper, 2/5)

HEALTH | A smoking ban currently in place in Rockville and Gaithersburg could soon cover all of Montgomery County. (WTOP, 2/6)

CRIMINAL JUSTICE
– The U.S. Attorney for DC has announced a strategy to prosecute some gun-related crimes in federal court, rather than DC Superior Court. According to the ACLU, this would contribute to mass incarceration. (WaPo, 2/6)

– DC officials are putting an additional $6 million toward violence prevention and jobs training programs in light of the recent increase in violence across the city. (DC Line, 2/2)

COMMUNITY | BB&T and SunTrust are set to combine in a $66B deal that will result in the third largest bank in the DC area by market share (WBJ, 2/7)

SHUTDOWN | DC Is Preparing For The Possibility Of Another Shutdown (WAMU, 2/5)

VIRGINIA | Northern Virginia lawmakers are welcoming Amazon to the region. (DCist, 2/5)


The Oscars won’t have a host this year – the first time since 1989 when Rob Lowe danced with Snow White in an opening number that is now considered the most cringe-worthy moment in awards-show history.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back tomorrow!

– Buffy

Maryland residents eligible for food benefit program aren’t participating

POVERTY | According to a new report by Maryland Hunger Solutions, a nonprofit working to end hunger in the state, over 200,000 people in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties who are eligible for SNAP, the food assistance program, are not using it. Participation has dropped steadily because many Marylanders are unaware of the program or believe they don’t qualify. And, many immigrant families are afraid of the federal government, particularly due to the proposal to change the “public charge” rule. (WAMU, 1/21)

Most people assume the reason why others don’t apply has to do with a growing economy. “The simplest reason that most people usually go to is that the economy is better, people are getting more jobs, they’re making more income,” said Michael J. Wilson, the nonprofit’s director. “In fact, that is a small part of it, but it’s not the major part.”

HOMELESSNESS | On the coldest day of the year so far the District saw a big spike in demand for homeless services. (CP, 1/21)

LGBTQIA | Several LGBTQIA bills in Virginia are gaining new supporters. (WaPo, 1/15)

RACIAL EQUITY
– Rick Moyers, formerly at the Meyer Foundation and former co-chair of WRAG’s Racial Equity Working Group, writes about what it really means for nonprofit boards to work on diversity. (RM, 1/19)

– The Racial Wealth Gap Could Become a 2020 Litmus Test (CityLab, 1/16)

HEALTH
– Alexandria city officials warned about the dangers posed by the illegal use of narcotics after four people overdosed on opioids this weekend. (WaPo, 1/21)

– The government shutdown is affecting the health of federal workers. (NPR, 1/18)

VIRGINIA
– The Virginia Senate rejected a proposal that would have raised the state’s minimum wage from the current $7.25 an hour to $15 an hour over five years. (WaPo, 1/21)

Two Northern Virginia Lawmakers Push Bill Requiring 12 Weeks Of Paid Family Leave For All Workers (WAMU, 1/14)

PHILANTHROPY
– A case is being made by the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy for general operating foundation support, noting that a reliance on program grants limits the effectiveness of foundation grantees, and themselves.

– How Can Philanthropy Advance Martin Luther King’s Goals? 13 Leaders Weigh In (Chronicle, 1/18)


The ‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’ that appeared on Sunday night was amazing – did you see it?

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back tomorrow!

– Buffy