Tag: homeless youth

Friday roundup – June 20 through June 24, 2016

THIS WEEK IN RACIAL EQUITY 
– Marcela Brane, Herb Block Foundation president and CEO, shared this year’s winner of the Foundation’s annual Herblock Prize for Editorial Cartooning. Be sure to check out the winning cartoon, “Racist EZCash,” by Mark Fiore(Daily, 6/20)

– The latest video in the Putting Racism on the Table series is live! The video features Dr. Manuel Pastor, Professor, Sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California, on the experiences of non-black racial minorities in the United States. While you’re at it, stop by our website to find the viewing guide and discussion guide that accompany the video.

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY 
– WRAG’s summer intern Hudson Kaplan-Allen offered the key takeaways from the first session of WRAG’s 2016 Nonprofit Summer Learning Series, “Dos and Don’ts of Working with Grantmakers,” and the importance of cultivating authentic relationships among funders and grantees. The event featured keynote speaker Rick Moyers of the The Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation, and panelists Julia Baer-Cooper, consultant with the England Family Foundation and Prince Charitable Trusts, Ben Murphy of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, and Tracye Funn of Washington Gas. (Daily, 6/21)

– PwC took home the Outstanding Corporate Citizen of the Year (Large Business) award at the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s 2016 Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards.

THIS WEEK IN THE DISTRICT
– Unemployment rates in D.C.’s ward 7 and 8 are at the lowest levels in several years, according to recent federal data from the Department of Employment Services. (WCP, 6/17)

THIS WEEK IN HOMELESSNESS
– Officials in Fairfax County are striving toward a more supportive community for the homeless with the opening of a new center. (WaPo, 6/22)

– According to data, more than 1.3 million U.S. students were homeless in 2013-2014. Advocates are looking to bring greater awareness and support to youth experiencing homelessness and extreme poverty, and a new report surveying homeless youth reveals that many schools may be failing to help students. (WaPo, 6/17)


JOBS

Associate | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Research Assistant | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Philanthropic Services Associate | The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
Grants Manager | The Norman & Ruth Rales Foundation
Senior Communication Consultant | Kaiser Permanente
Part Time Bookkeeper/Accountant | ACT for Alexandria
Associate Director | Arabella Advisors
Director, Corporate Philanthropy | Council on Foundations

WRAG’s Community Calendar

Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


So today is apparently #TakeYourDogToWorkDay. Brace yourself for cuteness overload and click the hashtag to see some dogs hard at work.

– Ciara 

First citywide program for connecting black women with HIV prevention drugs coming to DC

HIV/AIDS 
A $1 million investment from the MAC AIDS Fund will go toward making D.C. the first major city to get a program that will connect black heterosexual women (the second-highest group of new HIV infections) in the District with pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP. (Slate, 6/17)

In 2009, D.C. declared an HIV epidemic that rivaled those in many African nations, with around 3 percent of the city’s residents living with HIV. In some areas and age groups, it was closer to 5 percent. Though targeted prevention efforts have cut D.C.’s new-diagnosis rate by almost 60 percent since then, the city still has an HIV rate nearly twice as high as the state with the next highest rate, Louisiana, and nearly 4 percent of black residents are infected. In D.C. and across the country, HIV is a racialized epidemic among women: As of 2012, 92 percent of D.C. women living with HIV were black.

Channing Wickham, executive director of Washington AIDS Partnership, which is at the forefront of these efforts, had this to say:

The Washington AIDS Partnership is excited to be at the center of Washington, D.C.’s goal to “end HIV” through the soon-to-be released “90/90/90/50 by 2020” plan, and innovative HIV prevention strategies such as  Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for women. Stay tuned for a major announcement with more details on June 30!

RACISM/INEQUALITY | Marcela Brane, Herb Block Foundation president and CEO, shares with WRAG this year’s winner of the Foundation’s annual Herblock Prize for Editorial Cartooning, and the enduring impact and significance of the political cartoonist in society. Check out the winning cartoon, “Racist EZCash,” by Mark Fiore(Daily, 6/20)

REGION | Leaders of Washington’s former bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics are said to be keeping up the momentum of their efforts by continuing to meet to discuss objectives for further regional cooperation, even without the possibility of the summer games. (WBJ, 6/17)

DISTRICT
Unemployment rates in D.C.’s ward 7 and 8 are at the lowest levels in several years, according to newly-released federal data from the Department of Employment Services. (WCP, 6/17)

– A report by the District’s Office of Revenue Analysis examines the gender pay gap among the city’s workforce. While men make more than women for the same work in most industries, D.C.’s nonprofit sector is shown to be one area where women often make more than men in similar positions. (WBJ, 6/17)

–  This Is The Insane Amount of Money it Takes To Be Considered “Wealthy” in DC (Washingtonian, 6/17)

EDUCATION
Montgomery County schools have adopted a new budget officials hope will narrow the school system’s achievement gap and lower class sizes. (WaPo, 6/17)

– Data show that more than 1.3 million U.S. students were homeless in 2013-2014. Advocates are looking to bring greater awareness and support to youth experiencing homelessness and extreme poverty, and a new report surveying homeless youth reveals that many schools may be failing to help students. (WaPo, 6/17)

HEALTH/YOUTH
– According to estimates, there are still 37 million homes in the U.S. that contain lead-based paint and 6 million that recieve drinking water through lead pipes. With children shown to absorb more lead than adults, the American Academy of Pediatrics is urging physicians to be more proactive about testing children for exposure. (NPR, 6/20)

Video: Can the U.S. End Teen Pregnancy? (Atlantic, 6/14)


Just in case you haven’t heard, Clevelanders are very, very happy today.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – April 25 through April 29, 2016

THIS WEEK IN THE DISTRICT/THIS WEEK IN YOUTH
DC Trust interim Executive Director Angela Jones Hackley and board chair Marie Johns shared a message to friends and colleaguesregarding news that broke in The Washington Post about the organization. (WaPo, 4/26)

–  The District has one of the highest rates of asthma in the U.S. and many of those sufferers are lower-income children. Despite this fact, a planned homeless shelter in ward 5 is slated to open right near a bus garage. (WaPo, 4/23)

THIS WEEK IN MASS INCARCERATION
– Following a recent Putting Racism on the Table session on mass incarceration, Graham McLaughlin of the Advisory Board Company and returning citizen and business owner Anthony Pleasant discussed their personal insights into the justice system and the many challenges facing returning citizens. (Daily, 4/25)

– A newly-released report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation explores the impact of having an incarcerated parent on families. According to the study, nearly 10,000 children in D.C. have a parent who has been jailed. (WCP, 4/26)

– When Parents Are in Prison, Children Suffer (NYT, 4/26)

THIS WEEK IN POVERTY
– Ahead of WRAG’s upcoming Brightest Minds event featuring author and Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton University Eldar Shafir on May 18WRAG Philanthropy Fellow Hannah Davis broke down the idea of the “scarcity trap,”and why having too little is a such a big deal. (Daily, 4/26)

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH 
 Thousands Leave Maryland Prisons With Health Problems And No Coverage (NPR, 4/24)

–  Heroin epidemic worsens in Virginia (WTOP, 4/25)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


When you hug a dog, they probably want you to stop doing that…according to psychology.

– Ciara

Food insecurity rates remain high in the U.S.

FOOD
According to a new report, high rates of food insecurity in the U.S. following the recession have yet to come back down, in spite of rising employment rates. (City Lab, 4/22)

Food insecurity in America is an issue that can be hard to see. It is not synonymous with poverty: two-thirds of food-insecure households have incomes above the national poverty level, according to new data from The Hamilton Project. The same report also demonstrates that the way food insecurity is measured often masks the extent of the problem. Instances of food insecurity often arise suddenly and temporarily, and as a result are difficult to track from year to year.

RACIAL EQUITY
– Following the recent Putting Racism on the Table session on mass incarceration, Graham McLaughlin of the Advisory Board Company and returning citizen and business owner Anthony Pleasant discuss their personal insights into the justice system and the many challenges facing returning citizens. (Daily, 4/25)

– While many residents living in neighborhoods with very limited access to quality, well-stocked stores would be glad to have the ability to order from fast online delivery retailers à la Amazon Prime, if they happen to live in a predominately black neighborhood, most will find that such services rarely extend to their neck of the woods. The pattern plays out in many metropolitan areas, including the Greater Washington region. (Bloomberg, 4/21)

HEALTH | Thousands Leave Maryland Prisons With Health Problems And No Coverage (NPR, 4/24)

ENVIRONMENTD.C. Public Housing Buildings Will Get Solar Panels as Part of Sustainability Project (WCP, 4/25)

VIRGINIA
– Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe recently signed an executive order restoring voting rights to around 200,000 convicted felons. (DCist, 4/22)

AudioThe Kojo Nnamdi Show explores the economic impact of changing demographics in Fairfax County and across the Washington region. (WAMU, 4/25)

DISTRICT/YOUTH
–  The District has one of the highest rates of asthma in the U.S., counting many of its sufferers as lower-income children. Despite this fact, a planned homeless shelter in ward 5 is slated to open right near a bus garage, to the dismay of critics. (WaPo, 4/23)

–  D.C. Auditor: Summer Youth Employment Program Needs More Private-Sector Involvement, Yearly Independent Evaluation (WCP, 4/25)

PHILANTHROPY | In the movement toward creating more equitable communities, is philanthropy largely overlooking one potential solution – worker ownership? (Chronicle, 4/20)


It’s always a good day for a sandwich. Which of these have you tried?

– Ciara

A glimpse into the region’s future

REGION
According to a new regional forecast from the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, the region’s population will continue to grow steadily and will add nearly 1.5 million residents over the next 30 years. Job growth is also expected to be significant. Officials are concerned a surge in residents to the region will continue to present challenges in providing affordable housing and quality transportation. (WaPo, 3/9)

The [District] is projected to expand from 672,000 residents last year to 987,000 in 2045, when it will be just shy of replacing Prince George’s County as the region’s third-most-populous jurisdiction, according to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG).

Fairfax and Montgomery counties will continue to rank first and second. They and other counties in the region will continue to grow. But only Charles County, which is a quarter of the District’s size, will gain population at a faster rate than the city.

Related: Last year, 2030 Group president Bob Buchanan and George Mason’s Center for Regional Analysis senior adviser and director of special projects Stephen Fuller, led the charge to undertake an extensive research project providing recommendations for ways in which the region can reposition itself to maximize potential and remain competitive in the global economy titled, The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Future Economy. WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland also shared how philanthropy in the region might respond and collaborate with other sectors to meet challenges facing our communities. (Daily 1/15)

HEALTH
– As misconceptions change about what the “face of HIV/AIDS” looks like, grassroots efforts are proving to be helpful in empowering those who are newly diagnosed. (WTOP, 3/10)

– Medicaid Rules Can Thwart Immigrants Who Need Dialysis (WAMU, 3/8)

EDUCATION/HOMELESSNESS | With recently-announced plans to replace the D.C. General shelter with smaller facilities, some are growing concerned about what the changes may mean for overcrowding in surrounding schools. (WCP, 3/8)

PHILANTHROPY/GENDER EQUITY | Mind the Gap – How Philanthropy Can Address Gender-Based Economic Disparities (PND, 3/8)

ARTSOpinion: One theatergoer shares his experience watching a popular Broadway show featuring a diverse cast, and how he felt when he look around and noticed the audience was anything but. (NPR, 3/8)

JOBS | The Abell Foundation is seeking to fill its Grants Associate position.


This quick quiz will guess your age, marital status, and income based on which mobile apps you have on your phone. My own results came pretty close! 

– Ciara

A first-ever count of homeless D.C. youth

YOUTH/HOMELESSNESS
In an effort to better serve the city’s full homeless population, the District is conducting its first-ever count of homeless youth. The city currently has a goal of ending youth homelessness by the year 2020. (WAMU, 8/18)

The week-long census kicked off Monday and runs through Aug. 25. Service providers, city agencies and even some businesses are taking part in the count, which city officials say will help bring to light a population that isn’t often included in other homeless counts.

[…]

The District already takes part in an annual count of its homeless population. In May, the count revealed that on any given night, over 7,200 residents live on the street or in shelters throughout the city.

EDUCATION
– A number of school districts in Maryland expect to see record spikes in public school enrollment this year. Montgomery County, in particular, is preparing for the surge in students (WaPo, 8/18):

In Montgomery, the state’s fastest-growing school system, the total increase in students since 2007 would be more than 18,700 if this year’s projections bear out. Last school year, the county’s enrollment climbed by 2,563 students.

Singe Moms and Welfare Woes: A Higher-Education Dilemma (Atlantic, 8/18)

ECONOMY/HOUSING | The District May Be Heading Towards Record High Residential Construction (District Measured, 8/18)

POVERTY | Stories about the struggles of being poor often go viral or are included in the opinion pages of major news outlets, but very few of them are written by individuals who have actually experienced poverty firsthand. Recently, a famed author took a look at just why these pieces typically come from more affluent writers. (HuffPo, 8/17)


Can you find these lesser-known monuments on a map?

– Ciara

Service-sector scheduling practices have negative impact on workers’ well-being

WORKFORCE
A new report from DC Jobs for Justice examines the true impact of on-call and split-shift scheduling for hourly workers in the District. The scheduling practices are widely used in the service sector and cause more than just minor inconveniences for employees. (WCP, 6/11)

The report found that 40 percent of workers’ schedules will change after they’re posted. About half of the more than 400 people surveyed said they receive only two days’ notice of schedule changes; 30 percent of respondents said they receive less than 24 hours’ notice.

“Just-in-time” scheduling results in unstable incomes, an inability to schedule childcare and second-job shifts reliably, pursue higher education, or acquire a second job, the report says. These practices most negatively impact black and Latino workers, who together comprise about 80 percent of the service sector workforce in D.C.

EQUITY | How our cars, our neighborhoods, and our schools are pulling us apart (WaPo, 6/9)

EDUCATION
Opinion: In an effort to continue on the path of necessary education reform, DCPS administrators have created “units of study” aimed at shrinking the persistent achievement gap in the schools. Education advocates remain optimistic about whether or not the new approach will yield significant results. (WaPo, 6/12)

Virtual full-time high school may soon be a reality in Virginia (Loudoun Times, 6/15)

PHILANTHROPY
– CECP, in association with The Conference Board, has released an infographic of the results of their annual Giving in Numbers Survey, which looks at trends in the field of corporate societal engagement.

– In D.C., the Milken Family Foundation has announced plans to turn a historic bank into a new museum celebrating teachers that will be known as the Museum of the American Educator. (WBJ, 6/12)

YOUTH
– In a number of American cities, including D.C., those ages 16-24 living in majority-black neighborhoods are ten times more likely to be disconnected than those living in majority-white neighborhoods of the same city. Disconnected youth are individuals who are neither employed nor in school. (City Lab, 6/11)

– The Long, Hot Summer Ahead for D.C.’s Homeless Children (WAMU, 6/12)


Today, the Magna Carta turns 800 years old. See how much you know about Medieval law in this quiz.

– Ciara