Tag: gun violence

Voting rights could be restored for incarcerated prisoners in the District

VOTING RIGHTS | Lawmakers in the District are seeking to make the nation’s capital the first jurisdiction to restore voting rights to incarcerated prisoners, with plans to introduce legislation Tuesday to repeal language in a 1955 law that disenfranchises DC residents upon felony convictions. (WaPo, 6/3)

The District has some of lowest restrictions on felons voting, where their voting rights are automatically restored when they are released from prison, and election officials visit the DC jail to help non-felons cast absentee ballots … “Unfortunately in the District and across the country, incarcerated people make up a sizable population of residents,” said Council member Robert C. White Jr., who is introducing the legislation … “They don’t lose their citizenship when they are incarcerated, so they shouldn’t lose their right to vote.” White’s bill thrusts the District to the vanguard of the felon enfranchisement movement, and believes that the discussion around criminal voting restrictions should focus on the racist motivations of the laws and how they disproportionately disenfranchise African Americans.

CENSUS 2020Deceased GOP Strategist’s Hard Drives Reveal New Details on the Census Citizenship Question (NYT, 5/30)

Related: Vanita Gupta, president & CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, issued this statement in response to the New York Times’ revelation. Gupta is the keynote speaker at Thursday’s Interventions that Work: Census 2020 & Hard-to-Count Communities forum, co-convened by WRAG and 14 partner organizations to elevate strategies for a complete and accurate 2020 Census.

COMMUNITY | Last year WRAG launched the Journalism Fellows Project to share our platform with youth of color in this region who are often written about, but are rarely asked their perspectives on the issues facing their communities and families. In today’s edition, we hear from Thomas Kent, 2019 graduate of Richard Wright Public Charter School in DC, about the impact of violence in his neighborhood. (Daily, 6/4)

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | A new audit reveals that DC Mayor Bowser has awarded at least five housing projects to developers with low-ranked proposals. The move cost the city 353 affordable housing units, and raises questions about the process. (WaPo, 5/30)

WORKFORCE/EQUITY | Emergency legislation at the DC Council would prevent employment discrimination against city workers in the medical marijuana program. (dcist, 5/31)

NONPROFITS | New Pilot Program is Bringing Books to a Barbershop on Lee Highway (ARLnow, 5/28)

ENVIRONMENT | According to a just-published list put out each year by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Tidal Basin is among the 11 most endangered historic places in 2019. (WAMU, 5/30)

CHILDREN & FAMILIES | What Makes A City Child-Friendly? (WAMU, 5/31)

PHILANTHROPY | The Kids Are Alright: Millennials Reluctant to Give, But Donate Generously When They Do (Inside Philanthropy, 5/30)


It’s 3 am – do you know what your iPhone is doing? Yikes!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday!

– Buffy

Maryland to provide health insurance enrollment on tax forms

HEALTHCARE | Maryland is now the first state to let residents sign up for the state’s health insurance program when they file their taxes. Gov. Larry Hogan signed a bill Monday that allows residents to opt into health insurance by checking a box on their tax forms starting in 2020. (WAMU, 5/13)

The bill — which received bipartisan support in both chambers — will also increase spending on the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange by $1.2 million. Marylanders who don’t have insurance when they file their taxes can either pay a $695 penalty or put it towards enrolling in the lowest-cost insurance policy available. Should all go as planned during the 2020 tax season, Maryland could reduce its uninsured rate from 6.1 to 4.1 percent …  “we think this can be a model for the whole country” says Vinny DeMarco of the Maryland Citizens’ Health Initiative.

EDUCATION | Prince George’s County Interim Schools Chief Monica Goldson plans to give school employees $46.5 million in raises they missed in the aftermath of the recession. (WaPo, 5/14)

JUSTICE | A group of local activists bailed out Black moms incarcerated in Maryland and Virginia ahead of Mother’s Day, joining an annual nationwide campaign led by the National Bail Out collective, which aims to draw attention to issues of incarceration and cash bail. (WAMU, 5/10)

EQUITY/DC | The 11th Street Bridge Project has developed this short film about their approach to equitable development.

CHILDCARE | Some DC Lawmakers Are Asking If Every Family Should Get A Child Care Tax Credit (WAMU, 5/9)

GENTRIFICATION | Almost 3,000 people attended a block party protest in Shaw in response to the threats to Black DC culture posed by gentrification. (AfroPunk, 5/8)

TRANSPORTATION | Discussions continue over keeping the Circulator bus system free and who it benefits. (WaPo, 5/12)

HOUSING Montgomery County is aging, especially with younger seniors (GGWash, 5/7)

GUN VIOLENCE | Johns Hopkins University is aiming to capitalize on the student-led gun safety movement by offering a free online course to teach strategies to curb gun violence. (NPR, 5/13)

PHILANTHROPY | Giving Done Right: Effective Data For Philanthropy (Wesleyan University Magazine, 4/29)


Wow – at some point, there may be a car-free trail from DC to the Pacific Ocean.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday!

– Buffy

Thousands of families in the District could be moved out of public housing for urgent repairs

HOUSING | Years of neglect in the District has led to a crisis in public housing and the DC Housing Authority has asked local government to step in and help the agency pay for repairs. In testimony before the DC Council last week, Housing Authority director Tyrone Garrett said thousands of families in the District could be moved out of public housing to allow for urgent repairs to be made. (WAMU, 4/12)

The agency said 2,610 of its “extremely urgent” units need attention before the end of this year and an additional 4,445 units of its approximately 8,000-unit portfolio are in “critical condition,” – which means the vast majority of DC’s public housing is in serious disrepair. Garrett said the Housing Authority would need $2.2 billion over the next 17 years to get all of DC’s public housing back in good shape — and $343 million is required in the next fiscal year just to address lead and environmental hazards in the city’s most unsafe units.

EDUCATION
– In honor of 15 years, PNC Financial Services Group has made an additional $150 million pledge to PNC Grow Up Great, its program to expand access to high-quality early learning for young children in 40 communities.

– They believe more students should attend neighborhood schools. But what happens when it’s their child? (WaPo, 4/13)

ARTS/CULTURE | In the New Haven, CT, neighborhood of Dixwell, a once-thriving historic African-American neighborhood, Titus Kaphar – last year’s WRAG Annual Meeting keynote speaker – found a home for himself, and he’s creating a center there to nurture emerging artists. (NYT, 4/12)

GUN VIOLENCE | What Are Maryland Schools Doing To Prevent Gun Violence? (Kojo Nnamdi Show, 4/15)

RACIAL JUSTICE 
– Nikki Highsmith Vernick, President and CEO of the Horizon Foundation, writes in a Letter to the Editor that philanthropists should tackle racial justice. (Baltimore Sun, 4/11)

– A new documentary, Segregated By Design, examines the forgotten history of how our federal, state and local governments unconstitutionally segregated every major metropolitan area in America through law and policy. The film is based on The Color of Law, by Richard Rothstein (another past WRAG annual meeting speaker).

How Parole Perpetuates a Cycle of Incarceration and Instability (Truthout, 4/7)


Never give up – it’s all about the come back. Congrats, Tiger.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Thursday!

– Buffy

DC to open new middle school in growing Northwest neighborhood

EDUCATION
– In recent years District leaders closed more than a dozen schools because of low enrollment, but now a new middle school underscores the city’s strategy for retaining students in neighborhood schools. (WaPo, 3/26)

…A booming corner of the city is getting its second new middle school in recent years. The opening of the campus in Northwest reflects a strategy to bolster middle schools so families will stick around to attend public high schools.

The arrival of the campus in Takoma — the school, adjacent to Coolidge High, is part of a broader $150 million overhaul of the Coolidge campus — comes as middle schools and high schools in other neighborhoods sit with ample vacant seats.

In the Takoma, Brightwood and Manor Park neighborhoods, city leaders saw an opportunity for growth. The school system studied population trends with the D.C. Office of Planning and determined that the cluster of neighborhoods is poised for one of the biggest population growths in the city over the next seven years, bolstered by the arrival of immigrant and young affluent families.

Arlington Public Schools Developing an Implementation Plan for Transgender Non-Discrimination Policy (ARLNow, 3/27)

VIRGINIA/RACE | Virginia Governor Ralph Northam amended two motorist measures in the state budget with ‘race inequities’ in mind. (WaPo, 3/26)

HOUSING 
Mayor’s budget proposes slight increase for DC police, more money for programs that treat violence as health issue (WaPo, 3/26)

– According to a new report, the “vast majority” of dollars raised by DC elected officials through private donations to help District residents are not spent as intended. (WaPo, 3/26)

HOMELESSNESS | Employed full-time and experiencing homelessness in the Washington region: the changing face of homelessness. (WaPo, 3/22)

GUN VIOLENCE | Bump Stock Ban Takes Effect As Gun Rights Groups Ask Supreme Court For Delay (NPR, 3/26)

PUBLIC SAFETY | DC Police Reported A 20 Percent Increase In Use-Of-Force Incidents Last Year (dcist, 3/25)

GENDER | Teen boys rated their female classmates based on looks. The girls fought back. (WaPo, 3/26)

PHILANTHROPY | The Sweetness of Circles highlights the history, strength and growth of black-led giving circles. (Medium, 3/25)


How to cycle, drink, and cruise down the Potomac!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday this week!

– Buffy

Students march to fight gun violence

GUN VIOLENCE | Student protesters at a rally yesterday called for passage of federal legislation requiring universal background checks for firearm sales. The demonstration came a year to the day after thousands of students in region participated in a national walkout to protest gun violence, moved to action following the mass shooting in Parkland, FL. (WaPo, 3/14)

Hundreds of high school students, family members and people touched by gun violence marched Thursday to the US Capitol demanding universal background checks for firearm sales that awaits a vote in the Senate, following House approval. “We are here today because we have to be, because we have been failed by every institution that didn’t protect us,” Dani Miller, co-president of the Maryland group MoCo Students for Change, told the crowd. Miller’s group organized Thursday’s demonstration. “Our friends are dying, so we march,” Miller said.

– Last night 49 people were killed in a terrorist attack at several mosques in New Zealand. The horrific events in New Zealand underscore the urgency of activism and action against gun violence. (WaPo, 3/14)

PUBLIC HEALTH
– A new study finds that communities of color disproportionately bear the health burden of air pollution. Black and Hispanic communities on average experience 56 and 63%, respectively, more air pollution than they create, while white people experience 17% less air pollution than they produce. (NPR, 3/11)

– The District will finally have a maternal mortality review committee, joining nearly 30 other jurisdictions in the United States. (City Paper, 3/30)

WORKFORCE | A  $15 minimum wage bill has been approved by Maryland Senate. (WAMU, 3/14)

DISTRICT | DC will be able to maintain its own parks, thanks to a federal partnership. (Curbed, 3/12)

HOUSING
– Housing advocates say homeowners and tenants are likely to see increased home values and rising rents soon, because of HQ2 and because Greater Washington has long suffered from a lack of affordable housing. (WBJ, 3/13)

– Arlington County Board will vote on a $23 million incentive package for Amazon this weekend despite critics working to delay the vote. (dcist, 3/13)

– DC’s affordable housing funds aren’t going as far as they were just a few years ago. Higher construction costs have significantly increased what it takes to create affordable housing in DC. (Curbed, 3/11)

RACE | Stanford researchers found that black and LatinX drivers were stopped more often than white drivers, based on less evidence of wrongdoing. (NBC News, 3/13)

EDUCATION
– Several schools in Fairfax County are regularly isolating children. (WAMU, 3/13)

– Regional lawmakers want to allow schools to start before Labor Day. (WAMU, 3/13)

PHILANTHROPY
Funders Propose a Philanthropic “Green New Deal” (NPQ, 3/12)

– Grant Makers Urged to Rethink How They Are Organized and How They Operate (Chronicle, 3/12)

NONPROFITS | UMD’s Do Good Institute (WRAG’s partner on the Philanthropy Fellows program) is offering a series of free webinars on nonprofit management, fundraising, and  finance. Sign up here – here


Social Sector Job Openings 

Senior Program Officer | Potomac Health Foundation – New!
Grants Management Associate | Wellspring Philanthropic Fund – New!
Program Manager | DC127
Development Manager  | DC127
Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase
Northern Virginia Community Affairs Liaison | CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Programs Officer | DC Bar Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Want to avoid the flu? The trick is in the hand washing.​

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Monday, Wednesday and Friday next week!

– Buffy

Children in the District coping with “generational gun violence”

PUBLIC SAFETY/GUN VIOLENCE | Children in Southeast DC recently saw the death of a 15 year old friend and mentor. Approximately 160 people, including 13 minors, were killed last year, the majority in Southeast. The TraRon Center after-school community anti-gun violence program is working to help kids deal with trauma through art and therapy. (WAMU, 3/6)

Ryane Nickens launched the program [which is] modeled after her own experiences with gun violence, including the shooting deaths of two siblings. “It’s affirming … that love just doesn’t come from mom and dad or their family, but they have a community” Nickens said… Even before the shooting, the program incorporated art and group therapy to help the kids, mostly elementary and middle school-aged, deal with the trauma of what Nickens called “generational gun violence.”

RACIAL EQUITY 
United Philanthropy Forum members and colleagues share powerful stories of the role that racial equity plays in their personal lives in a newly released video.

– They were raised to be ‘colorblind’ — but now more white parents are learning to talk about race (WaPo, 2/27)

– An elementary school in Ashburn, Virginia has increased security after peaceful protesters entered the school’s office without authorization several days ago over an insensitive Black History Month exercise. (WTOP, 3/5)

EDUCATION
– DC Council Votes To Approve A New Schools Chancellor (WAMU, 3/5)

– Many elite colleges have committed to enrolling more low-income students, but, a new book argues, their efforts at inclusivity still fall short. (NPR, 3/5)

POVERTY | The Greater DC Diaper Bank Gives Away Almost 2 Million Diapers Every Year (WAMU, 3/6)

HOUSING
A new bill in DC would fine landlords who don’t take housing vouchers (dcist, 3/5)

– Legislation to increase a popular tax break for homeowners in the District was stopped after critiques that the proposal would disproportionately help the wealthy and would be better spent on targeted tax relief for the poor and middle class or on programs addressing homelessness or economic inequality. (WaPo, 3/5)

HEALTHSenate panel warns of dangers of anti-vaccine movement (WaPo, 3/5)

COMMUNITY | The Smithsonian’s Anacostia Community Museum will soon close for seven months for renovations. (WAMU, 3/4)


Say it isn’t so – this year could be our last Preakness.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Could building tiny homes help the affordable housing crisis in Montgomery County?

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | Montgomery County is facing a housing shortage. Could building more tiny homes help? Some county council members and affordable housing advocates believe they could. (WAMU, 2/27)

Many smart-growth witnesses at a recent hearing spoke to the benefits of tiny houses, or “Accessory Dwelling Units” (ADUs). Representatives from the Montgomery County chapter of the Sierra Club, the Coalition for Smarter Growth, Habitat for Humanity Metro Maryland and the Affordable Housing Conference of Montgomery County said they offer a sustainable form of cheaper housing at no cost to the county. Others said ADUs meet the needs of intergenerational families and homeowners who could use the extra income.

RACE
– A new report found that school districts that are predominantly white receive $23 billion more than districts that serve mostly students of color. (NPR, 2/26)

– Democratic leaders of the Maryland House of Delegates have asked Del. Mary Ann Lisanti to resign over her use of a racial slur. (WaPo, 2/28)

Virginia Expands Funding to Restore African-American Cemeteries (Afro, 2/22)

– After the recommended name change for Colonel E. Brooke Lee Middle School, the names of all Montgomery County public schools will be reviewed to ensure they are appropriate. (Bethesda Magazine, 2/26)

– How Racist Property Laws Formed The Neighborhoods We Live In Today  (Kojo Show, 2/26)

EQUITYIs Your Board Ready to Advance Equity? (NCRP, 2/21)

ENVIRONMENT | The Largest Solar Farm On The East Coast Is Coming To Virginia — If Opponents Don’t Kill It First (WAMU, 2/27)

DISTRICT | Sen. Warner of Virginia has now agreed to support DC statehood. (WaPo, 2/28)

TRANSIT
– Over District Objection, Metro Board Votes To Keep Current Metrorail Hours (WAMU, 2/28)

– DC has reinstated the driver’s licenses of nearly 66,000 individuals whose licenses were suspended because of traffic fines. (dcist, 2/27)

PHILANTHROPY
– According to a new study, the rate of grantmaking from donor-advised funds is resilient during economic recessions. (Chronicle, 2/26 – subscription)

How Liberatory Philanthropy and Restorative Investing Can Remake the Economy (NPQ, 2/28)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Corporate Responsibility- Mid-Atlantic Region Team, Vice President | JPMorgan Chase – New!
Northern Virginia Community Affairs Liaison | CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield – New!
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Operations Manager | Diverse City Fund
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
Vice President for Donor Relations | Community Foundation of Howard County
Senior Communications Officer | Gill Foundation
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Foundation and Government Relations Officer​ | ​Shakespeare Theatre Company
Grants & Communications Officer​ | ​The Crimsonbridge Foundation
Executive Director​ | ​VHC Medical Brigade
Director of Development​ | ​DC Bar Foundation
Senior Supervising Attorney, Criminal Justice Reform​ | ​Southern Poverty Law Center
Programs Officer |  DC Bar Foundation
Program Associate for Strategy, Equity, and Research | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Hello, hive mind: Who knew bees can do basic arithmetic?

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be published next week on Monday, Wednesday and Friday!

– Buffy

Upcoming Kirwan Commission recommendations to address educational inequality in Maryland

MARYLAND/RACIAL EQUITY
– Hundreds of millions of dollars in education funding may soon bolster Maryland schools if lawmakers can agree on how to divide the money. The Kirwan Commission, or the State’s Commission on Educational Excellence, will soon present its final recommendations for the new school funding model to lawmakers in Annapolis. (WAMU, 2/25)

In 2016, Governor Hogan called for the formation of the 25-member Kirwan Commission to address the gap in funding for public schools. This comes at a time when one study said Maryland is the 15th worst state in terms of regressive education funding … “meaning that districts with high proportions of low-income students receive less funding than schools serving wealthier communities” said William Kirwan, chair of the commission.

 

– With the release of a new report on equity in Prince George’s County solutions have been proposed to move the county toward equity and equality for communities of color. (Prince Georges Sentinel, 2/20)

VIRGINIA/RACIAL EQUITY
Confederate flag incident at Virginia high school sparks concern of racist behavior (WaPo, 2/24)

– Virginia state superintendent says schools must address racism in light of recent scandals. (WTOP, 2/25)

–  Swastikas have been found at three sites in past week in Virginia, in what appears to be three separate hate crime incidents. (WaPo, 2/26)

HOUSING
– The Virginia General Assembly recently passed hundreds of bills, including one that gives residents an extra two weeks to pay rent that is past due and one focused on eviction reform. (WAMU, 2/22)

 – There’s No Such Thing as a Dangerous Neighborhood (CityLab, 2/25)

GUN VIOLENCE | Maryland lawmakers heard from family members affected by gun violence as well as gun-rights supporters in Annapolis on ‘gun day’ in Annapolis. (WTOP, 2/25)

BUSINESS | The proposal to raise the minimum wage in Maryland to $15 has different opinions among the business community. (WAMU,  2/22)

PHILANTHROPY
– “Donors InVesting in the Arts,” or “DIVAs,” is a giving circle managed by the Greater Washington Community Foundation that is promoting civic engagement through the arts. (GWCF, 2/21)

– Funder support for media research has been growing as evidenced by the Knight Foundation’s recent commitment of $300 million to support local journalism. (Chronicle, 2/19 – Subscription)


“Plant-based” is so the new vegan.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Mass displacement of working class Latinx residents by Amazon predicted in new report

HOUSING 
– A recent report by New Virginia Majority predicts the planned Amazon campus in Northern Virginia will “intensify and accelerate the area’s affordable housing crisis.” The progressive group supports economic policies that benefit immigrants and people of color, and believes that Latinx residents will be disproportionately affected. (WAMU, 2/20)

Activists say incentivizing Amazon does a disservice to Latinx Virginians, in particular. Not only does Amazon have an apparent business relationship with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, they say, but the company’s relatively high salaries will attract affluent employees to neighborhoods near what’s now being called National Landing. That could increase demand for luxury homes, motivating landlords to sell their property to high-end condo developers and displace working-class residents, including Central American immigrants. “Without concentrated mitigation strategies and investment,” the analysis says, “a rooted, historic, unique Latinx community will be destroyed by the public investment that attracts Amazon’s HQ2.”

DC Chronically Failed to Spend Federal Funds to Remediate Lead Paint Hazards, HUD Says (CP, 2/21)

– Lawmakers in Virginia passed a new bill to waive many fees for new affordable housing developments. (ARLNow, 2/19)

Giving housing to the homeless is cheaper than leaving them on the streets. (Vox, 2/20)

COMMUNITY | Congrats to WRAG member Timothy Johnson of the United Way of the National Capital Area for being a Washington Business Journal 2019 Minority Business Leader Award honoree!

RACIAL EQUITY
– The Commonwealth Institute For Fiscal Analysis writes about Virginia’s proposed budgets and the racial equity impact on communities of color. (Commonwealth Institute, 2/12)

– Urban neighborhoods, once distinct by race and class, are blurring – yet in cities, affluent white neighborhoods and high-poverty black ones are outliers, resisting the fragmentation shown with other types of neighborhoods (CityLab, 2/19)

‘Slavery is not a game’: Virginia school apologizes over Black History Month exercise (WaPo, 2/21)

EDUCATION
District eliminates extended school year, invests more in classroom technology (WaPo, 2/21)

-The Loudoun County School Board is creating a task force to assess racial equity in the Loudoun County Public School System. (Loudoun County Times, 2/18)

GUN VIOLENCE | Students in Montgomery County plan to leave class on March 14 to lobby for gun control legislation on Capitol Hill. (Patch, 2/19)

PHILANTHROPY | Nonprofits and Foundations Are Unintentionally Promoting Racism: Here’s How to Stop (Chronicle, 2/20)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Management Specialist | DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Operations Manager | Diverse City Fund
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
Vice President for Donor Relations | Community Foundation of Howard County
Senior Communications Officer | Gill Foundation
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Foundation and Government Relations Officer​ | ​Shakespeare Theatre Company
Grants & Communications Officer​ | ​The Crimsonbridge Foundation
Executive Director​ | ​VHC Medical Brigade
Director of Development​ | ​DC Bar Foundation
Senior Supervising Attorney, Criminal Justice Reform​ | ​Southern Poverty Law Center
Director of Development​ | ​The Barker Adoption Foundation
Executive Assistant​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Programs Officer |  DC Bar Foundation
Program Associate for Strategy, Equity, and Research | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


A book’s final lines can make or break the experience. Here are 23 of the most unforgettable last sentences in fiction.

Next week we’ll publish the (Almost) Daily WRAG on Monday, Tuesday, and Friday.

– Buffy

How bikeshare can address, rather than perpetuate, DC’s disparities

EQUITY | In 2010, the DC Department of Transportation introduced the first city-operated bikesharing system in North America, and Capital Bikeshare users have since generated millions of rides, although use and station placement varies around the city. Equity is a focus in the bikeshare development plan, and the Urban Institute is looking at Capital Bikeshare’s potential to address the DC’s racial and economic disparities. (Urban Institute, 2/11)

We placed the 2017 data in the context of DC’s socioeconomic characteristics to identify challenges and opportunities for developing bikeshare equitably. Our analysis revealed two primary challenges. 1. Station placement isn’t equitable and follows patterns of existing infrastructure, and 2. Station use differs by neighborhood.

How can the city use bikeshare service to support its equity goals? … Drawing from best practices and studies on potential barriers for accessing bikeshares, here are some ideas policymakers should consider: 1. Promote transparent decisionmaking and access to data, 2. Develop infrastructure equitably, and 3. Ease barriers to access for disadvantaged communities.

WORKFORCE | The Walker’s Legacy Foundation, a fiscally-sponsored project of WRAG, has launched a new business program for low-income single mothers to help develop financial and entrepreneurship skills. (WBJ, 2/14)

FOOD SECURITY | Farmers in the Greater DC region are dwindling because of local development. According to a recent report by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments the decline is threatening food security and reducing the region’s ability to rely on itself for food production. (WAMU, 2/14)

EQUALITY | Inside the Virginia Capitol, a legislative duel over the ERA (WaPo, 2/14)

GUN VIOLENCE | Students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in partnership with The Trace – a nonprofit news site specifically focused on gun violence – have published Since Parkland, which involved 200 high school aged reporters who wrote 100-word pieces on each of the 1,200 children who died as a result of gun violence in the US last year. (NPQ, 2/13)

TRANSIT | With Major Funding Source At Stake, Metro Committee Votes To Keep Current Hours (WAMU, 2/14)

ENVIRONMENT | Many Americans are committed to recycling, but how much of what is put in recycling bins is actually being recycled? (WAMU, 2/12)

RACE
– A local Black Lives Matter activist is suing the DC police believing she is being surveilled, which echoes others around the country who have made similar claims. (WAMU, 2/11)

– Area Colleges Address Racist Imagery In Their Own Yearbooks (DCist, 2/12)

PHILANTHROPY
Opinion: Philanthropy’s focus on peace isn’t enough without attention to climate change as well. (Chronicle, 2/14 – Subscription)

Opinion: How Grant Makers Can Tune In to What Nonprofits Need Most (Chronicle, 2/12 – Subscription)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Management Specialist | DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities – New!
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Grant Writer | Framingham State University
Operations Manager | Diverse City Fund
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Controller | Meyer Foundation
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
CSR Internship | Gannett Inc., USAToday /Gannett Foundation
Vice President for Donor Relations | Community Foundation of Howard County
Senior Communications Officer | Gill Foundation
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Foundation and Government Relations Officer​ | ​Shakespeare Theatre Company
Grants & Communications Officer​ | ​The Crimsonbridge Foundation
Executive Director​ | ​VHC Medical Brigade
Director of Development​ | ​DC Bar Foundation
Senior Supervising Attorney, Criminal Justice Reform​ | ​Southern Poverty Law Center
Director of Development​ | ​The Barker Adoption Foundation
Executive Assistant​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Executive Director | The Volgenau Foundation
President | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Program Associate for Strategy, Equity, and Research | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


A book checked out in 1946, that was almost 27,000 days past its due date, has just been returned to the Silver Spring Library – and luckily, there is no fine!

Next week we’ll publish the (Almost) Daily WRAG on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday.

– Buffy