Tag: Fairfax County

The role of philanthropy in addressing racism | Dr. Gail Christopher’s Putting Racism on the Table talk now available

PUTTING RACISM ON THE TABLE/WRAG | The sixth and final video in the Putting Racism on the Table learning series is now live. At the last session, Dr. Gail Christopher, Senior Advisor and Vice President for Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, discussed the role of philanthropy in addressing racism and racial inequity in America.

Upon the completion of the learning portion of Putting Racism on the Table, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland said:

“Gail Christopher’s talk closed out a powerful learning journey for our region’s philanthropic community. We hope that these videos are fostering a deeper understanding among the wider community about structural and institutional racism, white privilege, implicit bias and how these forces have shaped our society. Events over the past two years, and especially this past week, drive home the urgency of this understanding – and also the urgency of action. WRAG looks forward to continuing Putting Racism on the Table as it transitions into a training series for our members, and to positioning the philanthropic community to potentially take substantive action on racism.”

After you’ve had a chance to view the video, we encourage you to share your thoughts via Twitter with the hashtag #PuttingRacismOnTheTable, or by commenting on WRAG’s Facebook page. We also suggest checking out the viewing guide and discussion guide to be used with the video.

EQUITY | Yesterday Fairfax County passed a resolution that will require the county to take racial and social equity into account in decision-making. (WTOP, 7/12) You can read the full resolution, “One Fairfax,” here.

RACISM/RACIAL JUSTICE| In a special guest post on the Consumer Health Foundation blog, Nat Williams, executive director of the Hill-Snowdon Foundation, reflects on last week’s killings and issues a powerful call to action for racial justice. (CHF, 7/11)

WORKFORCE | The Near Impossibility of Moving Up After Welfare (City Lab, 7/12)

EDUCATION
– At racially and economically diverse schools, parents with means often have more influence with school officials, marginalizing the needs of lower income students and families. (Atlantic, 7/13)

D.C. school lottery may cause parental anxiety, but it’s a research gold mine (WaPo, 7/11)

HEALTH | A new study found that nicotine use is on the rise among teenagers, thanks to e-cigarettes. (NY Times, 7/11)

PHILANTHROPY | With Millions at Stake, Some Foundations Slash Consulting Budgets (Chronicle, 7/12)

COMMUNITY | We are pleased to share that Ciara Myers, former WRAG program associate and editor of the Daily, has joined the staff of the Meyer Foundation as their new communications manager. Congrats, Ciara!


When the police have to issue public warnings about safety when playing a game on your phone, you know things have gone too far.

The Daily will be back on Friday!

– Rebekah

Friday roundup – June 20 through June 24, 2016

THIS WEEK IN RACIAL EQUITY 
– Marcela Brane, Herb Block Foundation president and CEO, shared this year’s winner of the Foundation’s annual Herblock Prize for Editorial Cartooning. Be sure to check out the winning cartoon, “Racist EZCash,” by Mark Fiore(Daily, 6/20)

– The latest video in the Putting Racism on the Table series is live! The video features Dr. Manuel Pastor, Professor, Sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California, on the experiences of non-black racial minorities in the United States. While you’re at it, stop by our website to find the viewing guide and discussion guide that accompany the video.

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY 
– WRAG’s summer intern Hudson Kaplan-Allen offered the key takeaways from the first session of WRAG’s 2016 Nonprofit Summer Learning Series, “Dos and Don’ts of Working with Grantmakers,” and the importance of cultivating authentic relationships among funders and grantees. The event featured keynote speaker Rick Moyers of the The Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation, and panelists Julia Baer-Cooper, consultant with the England Family Foundation and Prince Charitable Trusts, Ben Murphy of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, and Tracye Funn of Washington Gas. (Daily, 6/21)

– PwC took home the Outstanding Corporate Citizen of the Year (Large Business) award at the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s 2016 Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards.

THIS WEEK IN THE DISTRICT
– Unemployment rates in D.C.’s ward 7 and 8 are at the lowest levels in several years, according to recent federal data from the Department of Employment Services. (WCP, 6/17)

THIS WEEK IN HOMELESSNESS
– Officials in Fairfax County are striving toward a more supportive community for the homeless with the opening of a new center. (WaPo, 6/22)

– According to data, more than 1.3 million U.S. students were homeless in 2013-2014. Advocates are looking to bring greater awareness and support to youth experiencing homelessness and extreme poverty, and a new report surveying homeless youth reveals that many schools may be failing to help students. (WaPo, 6/17)


JOBS

Associate | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Research Assistant | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Philanthropic Services Associate | The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
Grants Manager | The Norman & Ruth Rales Foundation
Senior Communication Consultant | Kaiser Permanente
Part Time Bookkeeper/Accountant | ACT for Alexandria
Associate Director | Arabella Advisors
Director, Corporate Philanthropy | Council on Foundations

WRAG’s Community Calendar

Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


So today is apparently #TakeYourDogToWorkDay. Brace yourself for cuteness overload and click the hashtag to see some dogs hard at work.

– Ciara 

Watch Putting Racism on the Table | The Racial Mosaic of America, featuring Manuel Pastor

PUTTING RACISM ON THE TABLE/WRAG
The latest video in the Putting Racism on the Table series is now live! The video features Dr. Manuel Pastor, Professor, Sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California, on the experiences of non-black racial minorities in the United States. After you’ve had a chance to view the video, we encourage you to share your thoughts via Twitter with the hashtag #PuttingRacismOnTheTable, or by commenting on WRAG’s Facebook page. We also suggest checking out the viewing guide and discussion guide to be used with the video. Both are available on our website.

CSR/COMMUNITY | Congratulations to PwC for taking home the Outstanding Corporate Citizen of the Year (Large Business) award at the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s 2016 Outstanding Corporate Citizenship Awards!

HOMELESSNESS/REGION
– In Fairfax County, officials are working to build a more supportive community for the homeless and mend strained relationships with the opening of a new center. (WaPo, 6/22)

– Will D.C. General Stay Open Until 2020? Council Says Later Estimate Lacks ‘Credibility’ (WCP, 6/22)

WORKFORCE/DISTRICT | A new proposal before the D.C. Council aims to further protect low-wage retail workers from “just-in-time” scheduling practices. (WCP, 6/23)


Would you (or did you already) buy any of these strange products for your pet?

– Ciara

HUD proposes changes to federal housing vouchers in major markets

HOUSING/EQUITY
The Department of Housing and Urban Development recently shared a proposed new rule that would adjust the maximum value of federal housing vouchers in several markets in order to account for variations in what it costs to live in certain neighborhoods (WaPo, 6/17):

Instead of setting “fair market rent” standards at the metropolitan level, in about 30 major metros including Washington, New York and Chicago, HUD will set them by ZIP code instead. That shift will mean significant change for a program that serves 2.2 million households, more than live in public housing projects.

The policy is designed to enable low-income families to use their housing aid to move to neighborhoods with less poverty, lower crime and better schools — an opportunity that research has shown can boost prospects for poor kids. Until now, the voucher program that was supposed to give families a chance to move out of deeply poor housing projects has largely concentrated them instead in deeply poor neighborhoods. In cities such as the District, a voucher just isn’t worth enough to afford entry into truly “high opportunity” places.

–  A radical idea to compensate black homeowners harmed by racial bias (WaPo, 6/17)

WRAG/WRAG COMMUNITY
– WRAG’s summer intern Hudson Kaplan-Allen reflects on the key takeaways from the first session of WRAG’s 2016 Nonprofit Summer Learning Series, “Dos and Don’ts of Working with Grantmakers,” and the importance of cultivating authentic relationships among funders and grantees. The event featured keynote speaker Rick Moyers of the The Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation, and panelists Julia Baer-Cooper, consultant with the England Family Foundation and Prince Charitable Trusts, Ben Murphy of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, and Tracye Funn of Washington Gas. (Daily, 6/21)

– Daniel Solomon of the Naomi & Nehemiah Cohen Foundation will be leading DC Vote as the interim executive director. Solomon is a founder and board member of the organization.

EDUCATION/DISTRICT | Neurological research on child brain development following traumatic experiences has inspired some educators to rethink past approaches to zero-tolerance discipline. Schools in the District are investing in better strategies to help students overcome persistent stress. (WaPo, 6/18)

VIRGINIAMeasure to improve police trust, transparency up for vote in Fairfax (WaPo, 6/21)


A glimpse at public libraries across the country.

– Ciara

New report examines Northern Virginia’s disparities in life expectancies

VIRGINIA/HEALTH
A new report from the Northern Virginia Health Foundation and the Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health looks at the disparities in life expectancy among Northern Virginia’s richest and poorest residents. While the area often tops rankings for happiness, health, etc, many residents are falling behind based on factors like education, income, and race. (WaPo, 6/7)

In Fairfax County alone, life expectancy ranges by as much as 10 years between western Lorton and eastern Lorton census tracts separated by four miles. In western Lorton, where the median household income is $133,413 and 12 percent of the population is black, the life expectancy is 89. In eastern Lorton, where the median income is $77,901 and 37 percent of residents are black, life expectancy drops to 79, according to the report.

[…]

“It’s about city planning, zoning and transportation issues,” said Patricia Mathews, the president of the health foundation.

Read the full report, A Study in Contrasts: Why Life Expectancy Varies in Northern Virginia.

HOUSING | In their Matters@Hand thought leadership series sponsored by Enterprise Community Partners, HAND shines a spotlight on the Roadmap for the Region’s Future Economy and efforts toward regional collaboration on affordable housing. (Helping Hands Blog, 6/6)

EDUCATION
– The U.S. Education Department has released the latest data from the Civil Rights Data Collection survey covering the 2013-2014 school year for more than 95,000 public schools. Check here for a quick glance at the numbers. (NPR, 6/7)

Related:  This data reveals deep racial inequities in the education system, including in how discipline is administered (for instance, that black preschoolers are 3.6 times more likely to be suspended than white preschoolers). Education funders are invited to join us for the next session in our Public Education Speaker Series on July 7, which will focus specifically on racial and gender disparities in school discipline and strategies for addressing them. More information can be found here.

Opinion: Two experts discuss how constant stress placed on children in poverty can take a toll on their mental and physical health, creating a need for better collaboration between schools and health providers. (WaPo, 6/6)

–  Homework Inequality: The Value of Having a Parent Around After School (Atlantic, 6/6)

WORKFORCE/LGBT | With more than 90 percent of transgender people experiencing some form of harassment in the workplace, the D.C. Office of Human Rights and the National LGBTQ Task Force have created a first-of-its-kind guide for employers for making work environments more accommodating. (WCP, 6/6)

SOCIAL PROFITS | The Center for Nonprofit Advancement is accepting nominations for the Gelman, Rosenberg & Freedman 2016 EXCEL Award until Friday, July 15, at 5:00 pm. The award recognizes outstanding leadership among Washington-area social profit organization chief executives.


Quiz time! How much do  you know about Africa?

– Ciara

Food insecurity rates remain high in the U.S.

FOOD
According to a new report, high rates of food insecurity in the U.S. following the recession have yet to come back down, in spite of rising employment rates. (City Lab, 4/22)

Food insecurity in America is an issue that can be hard to see. It is not synonymous with poverty: two-thirds of food-insecure households have incomes above the national poverty level, according to new data from The Hamilton Project. The same report also demonstrates that the way food insecurity is measured often masks the extent of the problem. Instances of food insecurity often arise suddenly and temporarily, and as a result are difficult to track from year to year.

RACIAL EQUITY
– Following the recent Putting Racism on the Table session on mass incarceration, Graham McLaughlin of the Advisory Board Company and returning citizen and business owner Anthony Pleasant discuss their personal insights into the justice system and the many challenges facing returning citizens. (Daily, 4/25)

– While many residents living in neighborhoods with very limited access to quality, well-stocked stores would be glad to have the ability to order from fast online delivery retailers à la Amazon Prime, if they happen to live in a predominately black neighborhood, most will find that such services rarely extend to their neck of the woods. The pattern plays out in many metropolitan areas, including the Greater Washington region. (Bloomberg, 4/21)

HEALTH | Thousands Leave Maryland Prisons With Health Problems And No Coverage (NPR, 4/24)

ENVIRONMENTD.C. Public Housing Buildings Will Get Solar Panels as Part of Sustainability Project (WCP, 4/25)

VIRGINIA
– Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe recently signed an executive order restoring voting rights to around 200,000 convicted felons. (DCist, 4/22)

AudioThe Kojo Nnamdi Show explores the economic impact of changing demographics in Fairfax County and across the Washington region. (WAMU, 4/25)

DISTRICT/YOUTH
–  The District has one of the highest rates of asthma in the U.S., counting many of its sufferers as lower-income children. Despite this fact, a planned homeless shelter in ward 5 is slated to open right near a bus garage, to the dismay of critics. (WaPo, 4/23)

–  D.C. Auditor: Summer Youth Employment Program Needs More Private-Sector Involvement, Yearly Independent Evaluation (WCP, 4/25)

PHILANTHROPY | In the movement toward creating more equitable communities, is philanthropy largely overlooking one potential solution – worker ownership? (Chronicle, 4/20)


It’s always a good day for a sandwich. Which of these have you tried?

– Ciara

Housing tops list of worries for low-income D.C. residents

POVERTY/HOUSING
In a new report, researchers surveyed more than 600 low-income District residents to examine their most persistent stressors. Survey results revealed that, by far, most poor residents found issues surrounding housing to be their biggest source of anxiety. (WaPo, 4/4)

The main takeaway: Finding and keeping affordable housing is by far the dominant stress among low-income residents — more so than concerns about food, education or domestic violence.

[…]

Sixty percent of respondents said they worried about not having any housing in the future.

– How the Federal Government Plans to Stop the ‘Worst-Case’ Housing Crisis (City Lab, 4/4)

COMMUNITY
– Jeanné Isler of the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy (NCRP) shares a recent conversation with WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland on WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series, and NCRP’s enthusiasm about what lies ahead beyond the series. (NCRP, 4/5)

– Congratulations to Amy Owen of the Community Foundation for Loudoun & Northern Fauquier Counties on being one of the Loudoun Times-Mirror’s 16 Women To Watch in 2016!

ARTS
– Brookland in northeast D.C. will soon have its own Arts Park, with support from corporations and donors, including  the D.C. Commission on the Arts & Humanities. (WCP, 4/4)

– Following a big revival in 2012, the Howard Theater continues to face struggles with financial woes. (WaPo, 4/4)

– With Studio Space Scarce In D.C., Fillmore School Building To Offer Reprieve (WAMU, 4/5)

SOCIAL PROFITS | Exponent Philanthropy makes the case for funders to invest in social profit sector talent in order to yield greater results on performance and impact. (Philanthrofiles, 4/5)

VIRGINIA | Though Fairfax County remains one of the nation’s wealthiest counties, it has been unable to avoid the pitfalls of a stagnant local economy amid an influx of new, often lower-income, residents. (WaPo, 4/2)

HEALTH/RACISMThe disturbing reason some African American patients may be undertreated for pain (WaPo, 4/4)

JOBS | The Council on Foundations is hiring for the position of Director, Corporate Philanthropy. Find out more here!


Oopsie!

– Ciara

A glimpse into the region’s future

REGION
According to a new regional forecast from the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, the region’s population will continue to grow steadily and will add nearly 1.5 million residents over the next 30 years. Job growth is also expected to be significant. Officials are concerned a surge in residents to the region will continue to present challenges in providing affordable housing and quality transportation. (WaPo, 3/9)

The [District] is projected to expand from 672,000 residents last year to 987,000 in 2045, when it will be just shy of replacing Prince George’s County as the region’s third-most-populous jurisdiction, according to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG).

Fairfax and Montgomery counties will continue to rank first and second. They and other counties in the region will continue to grow. But only Charles County, which is a quarter of the District’s size, will gain population at a faster rate than the city.

Related: Last year, 2030 Group president Bob Buchanan and George Mason’s Center for Regional Analysis senior adviser and director of special projects Stephen Fuller, led the charge to undertake an extensive research project providing recommendations for ways in which the region can reposition itself to maximize potential and remain competitive in the global economy titled, The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Future Economy. WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland also shared how philanthropy in the region might respond and collaborate with other sectors to meet challenges facing our communities. (Daily 1/15)

HEALTH
– As misconceptions change about what the “face of HIV/AIDS” looks like, grassroots efforts are proving to be helpful in empowering those who are newly diagnosed. (WTOP, 3/10)

– Medicaid Rules Can Thwart Immigrants Who Need Dialysis (WAMU, 3/8)

EDUCATION/HOMELESSNESS | With recently-announced plans to replace the D.C. General shelter with smaller facilities, some are growing concerned about what the changes may mean for overcrowding in surrounding schools. (WCP, 3/8)

PHILANTHROPY/GENDER EQUITY | Mind the Gap – How Philanthropy Can Address Gender-Based Economic Disparities (PND, 3/8)

ARTSOpinion: One theatergoer shares his experience watching a popular Broadway show featuring a diverse cast, and how he felt when he look around and noticed the audience was anything but. (NPR, 3/8)

JOBS | The Abell Foundation is seeking to fill its Grants Associate position.


This quick quiz will guess your age, marital status, and income based on which mobile apps you have on your phone. My own results came pretty close! 

– Ciara

A longer road to economic recovery for some

RACIAL EQUITY
A new analysis hones in on state unemployment rates by race and ethnicity in the U.S. According to the study, while unemployment rates are down throughout most of the U.S., “only a handful of states have seen meaningful improvement in the labor market for African-American and Latino workers.” Virginia’s black unemployment rate is the lowest in the nation at 6.7 percent. (WSJ, 2/23)

Even in Virginia, the unemployment rate for black workers was twice as high as it was for white workers. The largest gaps in black and white unemployment were in the District of Columbia, where the black unemployment rate was 5.4 times that of white workers, and in Michigan, where the rate was 3.4 times higher, the report found. The smallest gap was in New Jersey, where the rate was 1.5 times higher.

– On Friday, February 26 and Saturday, February 27, the Reston Community Center, in association with the Equitable Growth Profile Advisory Group of Fairfax County, invites you to hear Professor john a. powelldirector of the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society and professor of law and African American Studies & Ethnic Studies at the University of California at Berkeley. Professor powell will present, “Racing To Justice:  Understanding Social Equity,” in two sessions that are open to the public and free of charge with pre-registration. Click here to learn more.

Related: Professor john a. powell kicked off WRAG’s, “Putting Racism on the Table”learning series last month, with a thoughtful discussion on structural racism.

ARTS/PHILANTHROPY | Audience Engagement Is All the Rage Among Arts Funders. But What Is It, Really? (Inside Philanthropy, 2/18)

VIRGINIA
– In Fairfax County, officials are hopeful for the effectiveness of the Diversion First program that launched this year to emphasize treatment in lieu of jail time for low-level nonviolent offenders with mental illnesses. So far, 103 individuals have been diverted into treatment since the program took off on January 1. (Fairfax Times, 2/19)

– Arlington Has the Highest Earning Millennials in the U.S. (Arlington Now, 2/19)

WOMEN/GENDER EQUITY
– Opinion: How Society Pays When Women’s Work Is Underpaid (NYT, 2/22)

– An analysis of the best and worst metropolitan areas for women-owned businesses gives parts of the Greater Washington region high marks in certain categories, along with some disappointing marks in others. (WBJ, 2/23)

DISTRICT | In this neighborhood guide, Washingtonian sheds light on some of the major draws to Southeast D.C.’s Anacostia area – present and future. (Washingtonian, 2/19)


With the recent announcement of the D.C. streetcar’s service date, a quick guide on how to ride the streetcar was only right. 

– Ciara

 

A widening education gap in the U.S. based on class

EDUCATION
Though racial disparities in educational opportunity persist, researchers are taking a closer look at how economic class has increasingly become the major determinant in a child’s educational attainment, and thus, their chances for economic mobility. (NYT, 9/22)

On the day they start kindergarten, children from families of low socioeconomic status are already more than a year behind the children of college graduates in their grasp of both reading and math.

And despite the efforts deployed by the American public education system, nine years later the achievement gap, on average, will have widened by somewhere from one-half to two-thirds.

HEALTH 
– A new report takes a look at obesity trends across the nation. In the Greater Washington region, D.C. has one of the lowest obesity rates (despite a steady increase over the years) at 21.7 percent; Virginia’s is 28 percent; and Maryland’s is 29 percent. (WAMU, 9/21)

Rising Health Deductibles Take Bigger Bite Out of Family Budgets (NPR, 9/22)

EDUCATION | As Fairfax County schools continues to grapple over an anticipated budget shortfall to the tune of $50 million to $100 million, officials seek community input for a proposed budget. (WaPo, 9/23)

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | The Atlantic offers a brief history on public housing in America and looks at some lessons big cities can take from small cities on how to provide successful public housing programs. (Atlantic, 9/22)


Who doesn’t love a good, completely unnecessary history lesson? Read this background of what many have come to know as the “sad desk lunch” – a practice that has endured throughout American history.

– Ciara