Tag: equality

Study examines the impact of ‘adultification’ on black girls

RACIAL EQUITY | Building on research that shows adults view young black girls as older and less innocent than their white peers, the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Georgetown University Law Center has affirmed the findings in its 2017 study through interviews with black girls and women ages 12 to 60 in towns and cities of various sizes across the United States. (WAMU, 5/16)

Through focus groups, researchers learned that young black girls are routinely subject to adultification bias, where black girls between the ages of 5 and 9 are perceived as being much older than they actually are … which contributes to harsher punishments in school and fewer leadership and mentorship opportunities. Among the solutions discussed is the idea that improving cultural competency and gender-responsiveness can help educators better understand black girls … “Change can only come when we add action to the data” says Rebecca Epstein, the center’s executive director… “We all have a responsibility once we know this information to start changing the landscape for black girls.”

CENSUS 2020 | Four of the nation’s most prominent foundations have committed millions to ensure a complete and accurate tally in the 2020 census, and are calling on other grantmakers to provide funding as well. (Chronicle, 5/15 – Subscription)

Related: WRAG is co-convening, along with 14 funders and other institutions, a day-long forum called Interventions That Work: Census 2020 & Hard-to-Reach Communities. The event will bring together the public, private, and nonprofit sectors to bridge the gap between information and action necessary to enable an accurate census. Learn more and register here.

EDUCATION
– Opinion: Montgomery County should let kids ride free to school  (GGWash, 5/17)

– Sixty-five years after Brown V. Board of Education, Montgomery County schools are  still trying to desegregate. (Bethesda Magazine, 5/16)

ENVIRONMENT
– The Potomac-Chesapeake Dolphin Project is looking for the public to help name two dolphins that live in the Potomac River. (WaPo, 5/17)

– States take steps to strengthen environmental regulations, widening the rift between stringent state policies and the administration’s deregulatory agenda. (WaPo, 5/19)

HOUSING
HUD Rule Targeting Immigrant Families Could Evict 55,000 Children (CityLab, 5/10)

– Opinion: The region has built a lot of housing – but not enough, and not in the right places (GGWash, 5/16)

VIRGINIA | Amazon Announces Plans For Arlington HQ2 Campus (dcist, 5/17)

TRANSIT | The DC Council is going to consider citizen parking enforcers to address parking challenges. (WaPo, 5/19)

ARTS  | New DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Director Claps Back (Afro, 5/16)

NONPROFITS | Philanthropy critic Anand Giridharadas writes that nonprofits should interrogate themselves on how the money that is fueling them was made. (NYT, 5/16)

PHILANTHROPY | Giving by Women’s Funds Has Soared. And They’re Getting More Savvy and Strategic (Inside Philanthropy, 5/14)


The new Spy Museum in the District highlights the past and takes on current day affairs.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday and Friday!

– Buffy

Landmark education bill will reshape Maryland’s public school system

EDUCATION | A landmark education bill designed to reshape Maryland’s public school system will become law without Gov. Larry Hogan’s signature, and will send an additional $855 million to schools over the next two years. (WaPo, 5/15)

Over the next two years, the funding will pay for school-based health centers, grants for schools where at least 80 percent of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals, raises for teachers — the state will provide a 1.5 percent raise if the local district gives 3 percent — and grants to improve teacher standards.

The Maryland Commission on Innovation and Excellence, also known as the Kirwan Commission, was asked in 2016 to devise a plan to create a world-class school system in Maryland and ensure that all students, regardless of race and ethnicity, are “college- and career-ready” by 10th grade. The Kirwan Commission also was charged with coming up with funding formulas to pay for the plan, but the panel released its recommendations this year without a breakdown of how the state and local governments would share the costs.

IMMIGRATION | Between 75 and 150 adult adoptees in the District and up to 1,700 Virginians are at risk of being deported. (WAMU, 5/15)

RACIAL EQUITY/HEALTH
– An emergency Task Force on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health has been created by the Congressional Black Caucus to address access to mental health care and suicide among Black youth, including those who are LGBTQIA. (Washington Blade, 5/7)

Opioid Addiction Drug Going Mostly To Whites, Even As Black Death Rate Rises (NPR, 5/8)

CENSUS | Mayor Bowser officially kicked off the District’s 2020 Census efforts by presenting a proclamation to honor the selection of her Complete Count Committee.

CHILDREN/SAFETY | A Centers for Disease Control study has found that 1 in 14 public and charter high school students in DC has exchanged sex for something of value. Students who had been kicked out of their homes, run away or been abandoned were most likely to have exchanged sex.  (WAMU, 5/16)

HEALTHCARE | How safe are Greater Washington’s hospitals? Some earn top grades for quality and safety, and others don’t score as well. (WBJ, 5/16)

ARTS | Mayor Muriel Bowser Wants Big Changes for the City’s Arts Commission (CP, 5/16)

WOMEN/EQUALITY | June 4 marks the 100-year anniversary of Congress’ passage of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution, and there are a number of places around the Greater Washington region to learn the history of women’s suffrage. (WAMU, 5/16)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors – New!
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table – New!
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners – New!
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Communications, Technology, and Administration | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director, Flamboyan Arts Fund​ | ​Flamboyan Foundation
Membership Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Development Director​ | ​Council on Foundations
Communications Director​ |​ Council on Foundations
Learning Engagement Manager​ | ​ Council on Foundations
Program Coordinator | TGR Foundation – A Tiger Woods Charity
Individual Giving Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Architecture is like a tree … it grows and matures and branches out. I am part of that tree, of that movement, not starting, or ending, or following anything.” I.M. Pei has died at 102.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Thursday and Friday!

– Buffy

Thousands of families in the District could be moved out of public housing for urgent repairs

HOUSING | Years of neglect in the District has led to a crisis in public housing and the DC Housing Authority has asked local government to step in and help the agency pay for repairs. In testimony before the DC Council last week, Housing Authority director Tyrone Garrett said thousands of families in the District could be moved out of public housing to allow for urgent repairs to be made. (WAMU, 4/12)

The agency said 2,610 of its “extremely urgent” units need attention before the end of this year and an additional 4,445 units of its approximately 8,000-unit portfolio are in “critical condition,” – which means the vast majority of DC’s public housing is in serious disrepair. Garrett said the Housing Authority would need $2.2 billion over the next 17 years to get all of DC’s public housing back in good shape — and $343 million is required in the next fiscal year just to address lead and environmental hazards in the city’s most unsafe units.

EDUCATION
– In honor of 15 years, PNC Financial Services Group has made an additional $150 million pledge to PNC Grow Up Great, its program to expand access to high-quality early learning for young children in 40 communities.

– They believe more students should attend neighborhood schools. But what happens when it’s their child? (WaPo, 4/13)

ARTS/CULTURE | In the New Haven, CT, neighborhood of Dixwell, a once-thriving historic African-American neighborhood, Titus Kaphar – last year’s WRAG Annual Meeting keynote speaker – found a home for himself, and he’s creating a center there to nurture emerging artists. (NYT, 4/12)

GUN VIOLENCE | What Are Maryland Schools Doing To Prevent Gun Violence? (Kojo Nnamdi Show, 4/15)

RACIAL JUSTICE 
– Nikki Highsmith Vernick, President and CEO of the Horizon Foundation, writes in a Letter to the Editor that philanthropists should tackle racial justice. (Baltimore Sun, 4/11)

– A new documentary, Segregated By Design, examines the forgotten history of how our federal, state and local governments unconstitutionally segregated every major metropolitan area in America through law and policy. The film is based on The Color of Law, by Richard Rothstein (another past WRAG annual meeting speaker).

How Parole Perpetuates a Cycle of Incarceration and Instability (Truthout, 4/7)


Never give up – it’s all about the come back. Congrats, Tiger.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Thursday!

– Buffy

Review finds hundreds of Fairfax students with special needs secluded and restrained

EDUCATION/DISABILITY RIGHTS | Fairfax County Public Schools officials have reported thousands of incidents of students with special needs being isolated or physically restrained. The preliminary findings of a recent review found 1,679 incidents affecting 203 students in the 2017-18 school year. (WAMU, 4/3)

Nationally, the available federal data shows that the use of seclusion and restraint is rare, but students with disabilities disproportionately experiencing the majority of cases. In Fairfax, district guidelines prohibit seclusion “unless there is a dangerous situation and seclusion/restraint is necessary to protect the student or another person or persons” …  “The board is confronting a problematic history here where there is an appearance that things have been swept under the rug,” said at-large school board member Ryan McElveen … “We are not going to move forward without a full investigation. This board is going to get to the bottom as to why this has occurred.”

IMMIGRATION/EQUITY | Tatiana Torres, a CSR regional director, shares her story about growing up undocumented on the Consumer Health Foundation blog. (CHF, 4/3)

HOUSING | A Maryland General Assembly bill that would have required landlords to give a reason for evicting a tenant was voted down. (Bethesda Magazine, 3/29)

DISTRICT | A bill has been introduced to the DC Council to build eight new statues, one in each ward, of accomplished women and people of color who were born and raised in DC. (WAMU, 4/2)

PHILANTHROPY/EQUITY | Opinion: Real Equity Means Including People With Disabilities in Philanthropy (Chronicle, 4/1)

WORKFORCE/EQUALITY | America has stalled on equal pay, and women of color face the biggest gap. (Vox, 4/2)

ENVIRONMENT | The Tidal Basin is deteriorating because of climate change and tourism. (WaPo, 4/3)

HEALTH | Maryland legislature agrees to raise minimum smoking age to 21 (WaPo, 4/3)


Remembering Marvin Gaye 35 years after his death.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Mass displacement of working class Latinx residents by Amazon predicted in new report

HOUSING 
– A recent report by New Virginia Majority predicts the planned Amazon campus in Northern Virginia will “intensify and accelerate the area’s affordable housing crisis.” The progressive group supports economic policies that benefit immigrants and people of color, and believes that Latinx residents will be disproportionately affected. (WAMU, 2/20)

Activists say incentivizing Amazon does a disservice to Latinx Virginians, in particular. Not only does Amazon have an apparent business relationship with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, they say, but the company’s relatively high salaries will attract affluent employees to neighborhoods near what’s now being called National Landing. That could increase demand for luxury homes, motivating landlords to sell their property to high-end condo developers and displace working-class residents, including Central American immigrants. “Without concentrated mitigation strategies and investment,” the analysis says, “a rooted, historic, unique Latinx community will be destroyed by the public investment that attracts Amazon’s HQ2.”

DC Chronically Failed to Spend Federal Funds to Remediate Lead Paint Hazards, HUD Says (CP, 2/21)

– Lawmakers in Virginia passed a new bill to waive many fees for new affordable housing developments. (ARLNow, 2/19)

Giving housing to the homeless is cheaper than leaving them on the streets. (Vox, 2/20)

COMMUNITY | Congrats to WRAG member Timothy Johnson of the United Way of the National Capital Area for being a Washington Business Journal 2019 Minority Business Leader Award honoree!

RACIAL EQUITY
– The Commonwealth Institute For Fiscal Analysis writes about Virginia’s proposed budgets and the racial equity impact on communities of color. (Commonwealth Institute, 2/12)

– Urban neighborhoods, once distinct by race and class, are blurring – yet in cities, affluent white neighborhoods and high-poverty black ones are outliers, resisting the fragmentation shown with other types of neighborhoods (CityLab, 2/19)

‘Slavery is not a game’: Virginia school apologizes over Black History Month exercise (WaPo, 2/21)

EDUCATION
District eliminates extended school year, invests more in classroom technology (WaPo, 2/21)

-The Loudoun County School Board is creating a task force to assess racial equity in the Loudoun County Public School System. (Loudoun County Times, 2/18)

GUN VIOLENCE | Students in Montgomery County plan to leave class on March 14 to lobby for gun control legislation on Capitol Hill. (Patch, 2/19)

PHILANTHROPY | Nonprofits and Foundations Are Unintentionally Promoting Racism: Here’s How to Stop (Chronicle, 2/20)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Management Specialist | DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Operations Manager | Diverse City Fund
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
Vice President for Donor Relations | Community Foundation of Howard County
Senior Communications Officer | Gill Foundation
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Foundation and Government Relations Officer​ | ​Shakespeare Theatre Company
Grants & Communications Officer​ | ​The Crimsonbridge Foundation
Executive Director​ | ​VHC Medical Brigade
Director of Development​ | ​DC Bar Foundation
Senior Supervising Attorney, Criminal Justice Reform​ | ​Southern Poverty Law Center
Director of Development​ | ​The Barker Adoption Foundation
Executive Assistant​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Programs Officer |  DC Bar Foundation
Program Associate for Strategy, Equity, and Research | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


A book’s final lines can make or break the experience. Here are 23 of the most unforgettable last sentences in fiction.

Next week we’ll publish the (Almost) Daily WRAG on Monday, Tuesday, and Friday.

– Buffy

How bikeshare can address, rather than perpetuate, DC’s disparities

EQUITY | In 2010, the DC Department of Transportation introduced the first city-operated bikesharing system in North America, and Capital Bikeshare users have since generated millions of rides, although use and station placement varies around the city. Equity is a focus in the bikeshare development plan, and the Urban Institute is looking at Capital Bikeshare’s potential to address the DC’s racial and economic disparities. (Urban Institute, 2/11)

We placed the 2017 data in the context of DC’s socioeconomic characteristics to identify challenges and opportunities for developing bikeshare equitably. Our analysis revealed two primary challenges. 1. Station placement isn’t equitable and follows patterns of existing infrastructure, and 2. Station use differs by neighborhood.

How can the city use bikeshare service to support its equity goals? … Drawing from best practices and studies on potential barriers for accessing bikeshares, here are some ideas policymakers should consider: 1. Promote transparent decisionmaking and access to data, 2. Develop infrastructure equitably, and 3. Ease barriers to access for disadvantaged communities.

WORKFORCE | The Walker’s Legacy Foundation, a fiscally-sponsored project of WRAG, has launched a new business program for low-income single mothers to help develop financial and entrepreneurship skills. (WBJ, 2/14)

FOOD SECURITY | Farmers in the Greater DC region are dwindling because of local development. According to a recent report by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments the decline is threatening food security and reducing the region’s ability to rely on itself for food production. (WAMU, 2/14)

EQUALITY | Inside the Virginia Capitol, a legislative duel over the ERA (WaPo, 2/14)

GUN VIOLENCE | Students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in partnership with The Trace – a nonprofit news site specifically focused on gun violence – have published Since Parkland, which involved 200 high school aged reporters who wrote 100-word pieces on each of the 1,200 children who died as a result of gun violence in the US last year. (NPQ, 2/13)

TRANSIT | With Major Funding Source At Stake, Metro Committee Votes To Keep Current Hours (WAMU, 2/14)

ENVIRONMENT | Many Americans are committed to recycling, but how much of what is put in recycling bins is actually being recycled? (WAMU, 2/12)

RACE
– A local Black Lives Matter activist is suing the DC police believing she is being surveilled, which echoes others around the country who have made similar claims. (WAMU, 2/11)

– Area Colleges Address Racist Imagery In Their Own Yearbooks (DCist, 2/12)

PHILANTHROPY
Opinion: Philanthropy’s focus on peace isn’t enough without attention to climate change as well. (Chronicle, 2/14 – Subscription)

Opinion: How Grant Makers Can Tune In to What Nonprofits Need Most (Chronicle, 2/12 – Subscription)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Grants Management Specialist | DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities – New!
USPSC Senior Contracts and Grants Specialist | USAID’s Office of Food for Peace
Grant Writer | Framingham State University
Operations Manager | Diverse City Fund
Development Communications Manager | PeerForward
Controller | Meyer Foundation
Communications and Development Specialist | Grantmakers In Health
CSR Internship | Gannett Inc., USAToday /Gannett Foundation
Vice President for Donor Relations | Community Foundation of Howard County
Senior Communications Officer | Gill Foundation
Individual Giving Manager | National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health
Development Manager | American Society of Landscape Architects
President​ | ​Virginia United Methodist Foundation
Chief Financial & Administrative Officer​ | ​Horizon Foundation
Foundation and Government Relations Officer​ | ​Shakespeare Theatre Company
Grants & Communications Officer​ | ​The Crimsonbridge Foundation
Executive Director​ | ​VHC Medical Brigade
Director of Development​ | ​DC Bar Foundation
Senior Supervising Attorney, Criminal Justice Reform​ | ​Southern Poverty Law Center
Director of Development​ | ​The Barker Adoption Foundation
Executive Assistant​ | ​Jack and Jill of America Foundation
Executive Director | The Volgenau Foundation
President | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Program Associate for Strategy, Equity, and Research | Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


A book checked out in 1946, that was almost 27,000 days past its due date, has just been returned to the Silver Spring Library – and luckily, there is no fine!

Next week we’ll publish the (Almost) Daily WRAG on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday.

– Buffy

A new children’s museum planned for D.C.

ARTS | D.C. has been without a children’s museum since the National Children’s Museum moved from H Street to National Harbor before closing in 2014. Now, children can visit a a temporary one, Explore!, at the National Portrait Gallery. The permanent museum will be located on a piece of land being redeveloped by the Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation. (WBJ, 1/3)

Explore! at the National Portrait Gallery will focus on interactive exhibits related to portraiture. Children of all ages will be able to draw and trace portraits, use felt pieces to create faces, do their own power poses for an interactive selfie wall and more.

The exhibit, which will remain up for a year, is meant to stir up support for the permanent museum before it is built, according to Rhonda Buckley, who will serve as its executive director.

“Jane’s[Cafritz] vision was to build community before they build the museum,” Buckley said of the museum’s benefactor. The longtime philanthropist started that work before the Explore! idea came up, purchasing and outfitting a school bus called Mission Mobile that travels to schools and engages students in science- and math-related missions that require collaboration and teamwork.

– How foundations should make arts funding more targeted and impactful. (SSIR, 12/22)

RACIAL EQUITY | January 17, 2017 will mark the first observance of a National Day of Racial Healing. The day is a part of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation initiative. Organizations and other committed individuals are encouraged to plan activities around the purpose of the day, which is “to heal the wounds created by racial, ethnic and religious bias and build an equitable and just society where all children can thrive.”

EQUALITY
-A Prince William County, Virginia lawmaker has proposed a bill that would regulate transgender persons’ use of public restrooms. Although many, including the lawmaker who proposed it, expect the bill to fail, it has still garnered outrage. (WaPo, 1/4)

Republican-led Congress denies D.C. delegate a vote. Again. (WaPo, 1/3)

AGING | By 2035, one in five American households will be led by a person older than 65. A new report lists the challenges of aging in place. (Citylab, 1/3)

CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY | The Corporate Volunteer Council of Montgomery County has announced that it will become a program of Leadership Montgomery. CVC plans to serve new and established leaders in the county while providing added opportunities for community service and volunteerism in leadership.

FOOD | Tomatoes and lettuce and eggplant, oh my! Farming warm-weather produce in winter (WTOP, 1/4)


Social Sector Job Openings

Associate Director, Policy & Communications | Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers 
Administrative Associate
| Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers 
Manager, Operations & Programming
| Walker’s Legacy Foundation
Senior Associate, Engagement – Mid-Atlantic and Retail and Direct Bank markets
| Capital One
Executive Director
| Philanthropy Network Greater Philadelphia
Grants Coordinator
| La Clinica del Pueblo
Director of Development and Communications
| Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs
President & CEO
| Delaware Grantmakers Association

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar
To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click the image below to access the calendar.


Two talk shows hosts and a basketball coach walk into a restaurant

The Daily Wrag will be back in Monday!

-Kendra

 

New report highlights racial wealth gap in D.C.

RACE/EQUALITY
–  A new report illustrates that discrimination and systemic racism contribute to the wealth gap in Washington, D.C., and that white households have a net worth 81 times greater than black ones. (City Paper, 11/1)

The analysis looks at disparities in financial power between the D.C. metropolitan area’s black and white residents, including before the Great Recession, which devastated communities of color. Researchers from the Urban Institute, Duke University, The New School, and the Insight Center for Economic Development conducted a survey in this region and four others in 2014, collecting information on household assets, liabilities, savings, and investments, and on homeownership, foreclosures, use of payday lenders, and demographics. Six hundred surveys were registered for the D.C. area.

The researchers found that—as of a couple of years ago—white households in the region had a median net worth of $284,000 compared with $3,500 among black households, or 81 times more. (Net worth refers to assets minus debts.) Accounting for age also revealed stark differences. Among 31- to 51-year-olds, black households reported a median net worth of zero, versus $221,000 for their white peers. Meanwhile, among 51- to 65-year-olds, black households showed $4,000 in median net worth, versus $516,000 for white households—or 120 times more. In other words, wealth disparities associated with race rose with age.

Related: It’s stories like this that make working toward building a more racially equitable region so urgently important – and why WRAG launched the Putting Racism on the Table series this year. Get caught up on the learning series and check out the latest release, “Structural Racism Theater.”

– Uber and Lyft Are Failing Black Riders (Atlantic, 10/31)

HIV/AIDS | In a special guest post for the Daily, Caterina Gironda of Funders Concerned About AIDS discusses the Washington AIDS Partnership’s new PrEP for Women Initiative. The model program addresses the growing rate HIV infections among African American women in DC by increasing knowledge of and access to PrEP, a drug that when taken regularly can prevent HIV infection if exposed to the virus. (Daily, 11/1)

TRANSIT |  “Reality Check” is the name that Metro’s general manager has given his 2018 “unprecedented” budget plan. (dcist, 10/31)

COMMUNITY | When Mickey Came to Town is a new film produced by Prince Charitable Trusts and the Center for Environmental Filmmaking at American University that will have its national broadcast premiere on Thursday, November 10 via Link TV. The film explores how, in the 1990’s, The Walt Disney Company unveiled plans for a new theme park in Haymarket, Virginia, near some of the most significant battlefields of the Civil War. But in the face of mounting opposition, Disney withdrew its plans a year later. Check it out!

HOMELESSNESS | Hagerstown, MD officials are looking into whether housing for those who are homeless is inspected at the same standards as conventional rental housing. (WTOP, 11/1)


I know how much Halloween candy to let my kids have – the question is how much candy should my husband and I have!? – Buffy

Last decade sees strong growth for nonprofit sector

NONPROFITS | The nonprofit sector has weathered the biggest economic downturn in decades, and has seen wages grow over 17 percent and employment grow 14 percent, according to the Urban Institute’s 2016 Nonprofit Almanac. (CP, 10/24)

That’s better than either businesses or the government, says the report, which looked at nonprofits with at least $50,000 in annual revenue that file Forms 990 with the Internal Revenue Service. At the same time, the number of charities grew 23 percent, from more than 237,000 in 2003 to nearly 294,000. The fact that charities did as well as they did during the recession is significant because the nonprofit world accounts for 5.4 percent of the gross domestic product and employs 14.4 million people. Massive nonprofit job losses and reduction in nonprofits services could have meant an even more dire overall economy than Americans experienced, say the report’s authors.

“The nonprofit sector is resilient,” says Nathan Dietz, senior research associate at Urban Institute’s Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy. “What kind of a role has the support of the nonprofit sector played in the overall recovery of the economy?” Mr. Dietz says. “It’s been able to provide a safety net. If not for the nonprofit sector, a lot more people would be in real trouble.”

POVERTY | A new report looks at how D.C. could help families by expanding the welfare program. (City Paper, 10/25)

WORKFORCE | According to the new Trends in Workforce Demand: Seven Key Economic Clusters Report by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, economic growth in the D.C. region will depend on STEM Jobs.

DISTRICT | The District’s Office of Zoning has a new interactive map showing D.C.’s different zones, what they mean, and how they are organized. (GGW, 10/25)

HOUSING | The D.C. attorney general has sued a real estate company for allowing one of its Ward 8 properties to fall into dangerous disrepair. (City Paper, 10/25)

EQUALITY | In one corner of the law, minorities and women are often valued less (WaPo, 10/25)

HEALTH | As part of the Health Means Business (HMB) Campaign, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is now accepting applications and nominations for the inaugural Healthy10 Awards, which will honor ten outstanding cross-sector collaborations or innovative businesses working to improve the health, well-being and equity in their communities.

PHILANTHROPYPhilanthropy, Policy and Culture: “Find a Way to Help that Doesn’t Undermine”  (NPQ, 10/24)


I’d love to go visit even 1 of these 10 spooky spots in D.C., but I’m too scared … my kids however, would go in a heartbeat – Buffy