Tag: Enterprise Community Partners

The government shutdown cost the local economy $1.6 billion

SHUTDOWN 
– The government shutdown cost the DC region more than $1.6 billion in lost economic output, according to George Mason University economist Stephen Fuller – and it may have damaged the region’s image as well. (WaPo, 1/26)

Civic leaders, business owners and other analysts believe the closing of federal agencies has harmed the government’s reputation as a reliable business partner and employer, and it has affected the morale of local federal workers and contractors who went unpaid. Additionally, there is concern that companies and employees will look for work in the private sector, and hurt investment in the region. “It should have been the best year of the decade,” Fuller said. “It’s going to struggle to fulfill its potential.”

– In her latest column, WRAG’s president Tamara Lucas Copeland recognizes the strain on nonprofit organizations that ramped up to meet the needs of furloughed workers and others affected by the shutdown – and that now have to continue providing critical safety net services, with diminished financial resources. For many of those organizations, the emergency isn’t over, even if the media moves on. (Daily, 1/28)

HOUSING
– A housing complex in DC was developed specifically for grandparents raising children, or “grandfamilies,” whose numbers have been growing in recent years. As of 2017, 2.8 million children were being raised by 2.6 million grandparents, including 7,250 kids in DC. (WaPo, 1/22)

Enterprise Community Partners will invest $250 million over five years to spur collaboration among health, housing, and community development sectors through the newly launched “Health Begins with Home” – a national initiative to harness the power of affordable homes to create healthier families and stronger communities. (Enterprise, 1/24)

EDUCATION
– Virginia educators are taking to the streets and marching to the state capitol today to protest a lack of money for public schools. (WaPo, 1/27)

– Johns Hopkins University plans to buy the Newseum building in DC, and will maintain the building’s uses for “education, discovery, [and] free and open debate.” (Curbed, 1/25)

CENSUS | Even if the citizenship question is not on the 2020 census, people still may be afraid to report their information. (CityLab, 1/22)

HEALTH | In an attempt to diversify the next generation of doctors and focus on the shortage of primary care physicians in underserved areas, free tuition is being offered to medical students at New York University. (NPQ, 1/25)

MONTGOMERY COUNTY | Here are seven ways Montgomery County is changing (GGW, 1/24)

PHILANTHROPY | How Philanthropy Can Get Serious About Racial Healing (Chronicle, 1/22)


“Food Halls” are having a moment, and there’s a new Latin American food hall and market – La Cosecha – coming to DC this summer.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

New report examines Northern Virginia’s disparities in life expectancies

VIRGINIA/HEALTH
A new report from the Northern Virginia Health Foundation and the Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health looks at the disparities in life expectancy among Northern Virginia’s richest and poorest residents. While the area often tops rankings for happiness, health, etc, many residents are falling behind based on factors like education, income, and race. (WaPo, 6/7)

In Fairfax County alone, life expectancy ranges by as much as 10 years between western Lorton and eastern Lorton census tracts separated by four miles. In western Lorton, where the median household income is $133,413 and 12 percent of the population is black, the life expectancy is 89. In eastern Lorton, where the median income is $77,901 and 37 percent of residents are black, life expectancy drops to 79, according to the report.

[…]

“It’s about city planning, zoning and transportation issues,” said Patricia Mathews, the president of the health foundation.

Read the full report, A Study in Contrasts: Why Life Expectancy Varies in Northern Virginia.

HOUSING | In their Matters@Hand thought leadership series sponsored by Enterprise Community Partners, HAND shines a spotlight on the Roadmap for the Region’s Future Economy and efforts toward regional collaboration on affordable housing. (Helping Hands Blog, 6/6)

EDUCATION
– The U.S. Education Department has released the latest data from the Civil Rights Data Collection survey covering the 2013-2014 school year for more than 95,000 public schools. Check here for a quick glance at the numbers. (NPR, 6/7)

Related:  This data reveals deep racial inequities in the education system, including in how discipline is administered (for instance, that black preschoolers are 3.6 times more likely to be suspended than white preschoolers). Education funders are invited to join us for the next session in our Public Education Speaker Series on July 7, which will focus specifically on racial and gender disparities in school discipline and strategies for addressing them. More information can be found here.

Opinion: Two experts discuss how constant stress placed on children in poverty can take a toll on their mental and physical health, creating a need for better collaboration between schools and health providers. (WaPo, 6/6)

–  Homework Inequality: The Value of Having a Parent Around After School (Atlantic, 6/6)

WORKFORCE/LGBT | With more than 90 percent of transgender people experiencing some form of harassment in the workplace, the D.C. Office of Human Rights and the National LGBTQ Task Force have created a first-of-its-kind guide for employers for making work environments more accommodating. (WCP, 6/6)

SOCIAL PROFITS | The Center for Nonprofit Advancement is accepting nominations for the Gelman, Rosenberg & Freedman 2016 EXCEL Award until Friday, July 15, at 5:00 pm. The award recognizes outstanding leadership among Washington-area social profit organization chief executives.


Quiz time! How much do  you know about Africa?

– Ciara

Few transit options for the region’s lower-income riders

TRANSIT
With a year’s worth of maintenance slated to take place throughout the Metrorail system, the impact is expected to be felt by most in the region. Those earning less than $30,000 annually, however, may be hit the hardest with fewer options for teleworking or affordable commutes to work. (City Lab, 5/19)

Among the 11 percent of Metrorail customers who earn less than $30,000 per year, many work low-wage, hourly shifts that don’t offer the option to telework. These riders can’t necessarily afford the convenience of a cab, an Uber, or even a smartphone to hail one. These riders still need to be able to get to their jobs, and for 29 hours in March, it was a lot harder for some.

EDUCATION
– Natalie Wexler – education blogger/editor of Greater Greater Education and DC Eduphile, and trustee of the Omega Foundation  discusses the challenges in achieving reading success for low-income students. On June 2, Dr. Willingham, psychology professor at the University of Virginia, will dive further into the role of background knowledge in reading comprehension and the persistent achievement gap among affluent and low-income students. (Daily, 5/23)

– Does Mindfulness Actually Work in Schools? (Atlantic, 5/20)

COMMUNITY
 The Citi Foundation announced the 40 social profit organizations selected as inaugural recipients of their Community Progress Makers Fund – a $20 million grant initiative supporting community organizations leading urban transformation efforts that create economic opportunities for low-income households and communities. D.C. is one of six U.S. cities with organizations that were selected, such as: Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing; Capital Area Asset Builders; Enterprise Community Partners Mid-Atlantic; Latino Economic Development Center; and LIFT

– The Center for Nonprofit Advancement has announced Higher Achievement as the winner of their 2016 AIM (Advancement in Management) Award, along with A-SPAN and National Children’s Alliance receiving honorable mentions. Pepco, Capital One Bank, and the Rotary Club of Washington, DC were sponsors of the award. Award recipients will also host an informative best practices session on May 24 at 10:00 am.

IMMIGRATION/POVERTY | Many of the young, recent Central American immigrants to the Washington region find that post-traumatic stress and poverty, along with attending high school, can result in a difficult cycle. (WAMU, 5/19)

HEALTH/CHILDREN
– With a growing number of students showing signs of mental health problems at school, educators are struggling to meet their needs. WAMU and nprED have presented a series on the challenges and possible solutions to approaching mental health issues in children. (WAMU, 5/23)

Due to a several challenges, the federal Summer Food Service Program – aimed at providing meals to children from low-income families during school break – only ends up reaching around 15 percent of those eligible. In places like Silver Spring, MD, for example, some children may have a hard time qualifying for such benefits when low-income housing is often in close proximity to affluent neighborhoods. (City Lab, 5/20)

–  Should Pediatricians Ask Parents If They’re Poor? (NPR, 5/18)

DISTRICT | The Washington Post explores the surge in homicides in D.C.’s ward 7. (WaPo, 5/21)


We all need to get adequate sleep, and trees are (possibly) no different.

– Ciara

Assessing a $15 minimum wage

WORKFORCE
A new analysis by the Economic Policy Institute explores what a $15 minimum wage could mean to workers in the District. A number of local groups remain divided over the long-term impact of raising the minimum wage (WAMU, 5/4):

The organization’s assessment buttresses the arguments made by groups and elected officials pushing the $15 minimum wage: In an area that’s growing increasingly expensive and unequal, giving low-wage workers a pay raise is a needed step towards helping them stay afloat.

But it also marks the start of what is likely to be a spirited debate over the merits of raising the minimum wage, with local business groups standing at the ready to unveil their own studies arguing that while a higher wage may help workers get by, it will also mean that employers either create fewer jobs or [move] to jurisdictions — like Virginia — where the minimum wage remains much lower, at $7.25.

JOBS | WRAG is pleased to announced the launch of our new and improved job board! This service is available to the region’s philanthropic and nonprofit community. Job postings are free for WRAG members and $60 for non-members. As a benefit for using WRAG’s job board, each posting will be included in a weekly roundup of job opportunities right here in the Daily WRAG. For any questions about using the job board, contact Rebekah Seder, seder@washingtongrantmakers.org.

HOUSING/REGION
– In their Matters@Hand thought leadership series sponsored by Enterprise Community Partners, HAND looks at some of the emerging innovations surrounding the creation of local funding resources for affordable housing in the region, including one that WRAG is involved in (Helping Hands Blog, 5/4):

In our region, the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers has teamed up with Enterprise Community Partners to develop a new approach to generating resources to invest in local affordable housing.  Individuals and organizations can invest in the Enterprise Community Impact Note and those investments will be used to help finance the creation of affordable housing. Investors will receive a fixed-rate of return and will also receive regular statements about the social impact of their investments.  The goal of the new fund is to raise at least $5 million to help build affordable housing throughout the region, and will reflect a truly innovative way of raising capital.

Washington City Paper offers a glimpse into D.C.’s low-rent units, where many tenants live in constant fear of losing their homes and must deal with unresponsive landlords who neglect properties. (WCP, 4/29)

– D.C. At-Large Councilmember Anita Bonds has introduced a bill aimed at landlords who “purposely neglect their buildings and put their tenants’ health and safety at risk.” (WCP, 5/3)

– Local Initiatives Support Corporation has made a $50 million commitment toward ensuring that residents living in the area surrounding the highly-anticipated 11th Street Bridge Park will not be displaced once it opens. (WaPo, 5/3)

PHILANTHROPY
–  Opinion5 Issues Foundations Must Confront to Stay Relevant (Chronicle, 5/3)

– Close Up Shop and Go Elsewhere? A Case Study for Philanthropy on What to Do When We Win (NPQ, 4/29)

ARTS/VIRGINIA
– The Initiative for Public Art Reston (IPAR) plans to display bike rack designs as public works of art later this year. IPAR issued a call for artists from the region to submit their designs that reflect five sites in the surrounding area. (Reston Now, 5/2)


Anyone know the number to a really fancy plumber?

– Ciara

Protecting the future of arts spaces

ARTS 
Washington City Paper examines the controversial conversion of 411 New York Ave NE, the home of Union Arts and a long-time DIY arts venue in D.C. that provides affordable space for organizations, visual artists, and underground musicians, into a luxury hotel that, as currently planned, will have a limited supply of studio space available to artists. The organized pushback against the development highlights the severe shortage of affordable space for artists and musicians to live, practice, perform, and work in D.C. (and elsewhere in the region) – and the irony that robust arts and culture scenes contribute to the rising real estate values that push artists out (WCP, 4/1):

[The] hotel project might fit into Mayor Muriel Bowser’s stated goal of “support[ing] and expand[ing] the District’s creative economy,” but for many of the artist tenants of 411 New York Ave. NE and members of the broader arts community, it dissolves a cherished, vibrant, and important arts space. To them, it’s cultural displacement.

To them, this isn’t a struggle to save a building, but a fight to save the future of D.C.’s underground arts communities.

When few question the value of the creative economy to the overall vibrancy of our region, this situation raises important questions about how government, businesses and developers, artists, and funders can preserve and create spaces for artists.

COMMUNICATIONS | On the heels of Twitter’s recent 10th birthday, I ask the question, “What’s the fuss about Twitter?” and explain why you (or the leader of your organization) should start tweeting now. (Daily 4/4)

HOUSING | In their Matters@Hand thought leadership series sponsored by Enterprise Community Partners, HAND explores the realities of mixed-income housing in the region and the benefits these strategies have actually had for the area’s low-income residents. (Helping Hands Blog, 4/1)

REGION/WORKFORCE | As National Harbor in Prince George’s County continues to grow into an employment core and regional destination, a transit line linking the hub to Alexandria remains absent. The adjacent communities have yet to compromise on a specific route or funding for a transit project, further underscoring the need for regional cooperation in order to avoid hindering the economic potential of the area and service workers’ ability to commute. (WaPo, 4/1)

COMMUNITY 
– The CareFirst open grant application deadline for 2016 is June 13 at 11:59 PM. 501(c)(3) organizations can submit their online applications in support of health-related services or innovative programs. Find out more here.

– The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments is one of 10 organizations from across the U.S. selected administer a three-year USDA initiative called FoodLINC (Leveraging Investment for Network Coordination) to strengthen the region’s local food business sector, while expanding consumer access to healthy, local food. Agua Fund and Prince Charitable Trusts are philanthropic partners. Read more here.

EQUITY | Lately, due to a number of incidents in the news, many voices are calling for more police officers to be required to wear body cameras. But even with camera footage, there is often debate as to what the videos actually portray. The New York Times presents an exercise in a phenomenon known as “camera perspective bias.” (NYT, 4/1)

PHILANTHROPY | Opinion: Now or Forever: Rethinking Foundation Life Spans (Chronicle, 3/30)

JOBS | Arabella Advisors seeks a qualified candidate for the position of Associate Director, Consulting Services for their Good Food team.


Are you ready for some baseball? Test your knowledge of the sport with this quiz.

– Ciara

Visualizing the affordable housing deficit across the U.S.

HOUSING
A new report by the National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC ) finds that each county in the U.S. is lacking in affordable housing, and there is no state where someone earning a minimum wage salary could afford to rent a two-bedroom apartment at market rate. NLIHC also created a map to visualize the number of affordable units available to low-income renters by each state. (City Lab, 3/28)

Using 2014 American Community Survey data, the report’s authors calculated the number of units families earning below 30 percent of the median income in their areas could rent comfortably, without devoting more than 30 percent of their income towards housing.

[…]

Overall, the report found that only 31 such units existed for every set of 100 poor families in the U.S. And this deficit increased as families got poorer (only 17 affordable units were available per 100 families in the bottom 15 percent, for example)—and turned into a surplus for those at the higher end of the income ladder.

– At a recent affordable housing forum, vice president and Mid-Atlantic Market Leader of Enterprise Community Partners and WRAG Board member David Bowers, discussed challenges and strategies surrounding affordable housing and community development in the region. (Bisnow, 3/28)

– DC Fiscal Policy Institute examines Mayor Bowser’s proposed fiscal year 2017 budget and what it could mean for affordable housing and rental assistance for District residents. (DCFPI, 3/28)

– Living From Rent To Rent: Tenants On The Edge Of Eviction (NPR, 3/29)

FOOD 
– Meal delivery services are a great convenience, but only when you live in the right zip code. Many of these services don’t extend their offerings to communities that could truly benefit from broader meal options – communities considered food deserts. (DCist, 3/24)

– Organic Foods Still Aren’t As Mass Market As You Might Think (NPR, 3/28)

WOMEN/WORKFORCE | A new report finds that 24 of the 25 largest U.S. cities saw the average rate of growth for women-owned businesses surpass the national average. Further, the report found a funding gap between women and men-owned firms that, if decreased, would strengthen the economy significantly. Citi Community Development is named as a partner in helping female business owners reach their goals. (City Lab, 3/24)


Check out some great photos of the cherry blossoms in full bloom.

– Ciara

Lowering the price of produce may save both money and lives

FOOD
At an American Heart Association epidemiology meeting this week, researchers are sharing a new food policy computer model that demonstrates how the pricing of healthy foods affects health outcomes (NPR, 3/2):

Researchers from the [U.K.’s Imperial College] and Tufts University created a tool called the U.S. IMPACT Food Policy Model that included projections of U.S. demographics and cardiovascular death rates to 2030. They then combined the data with current and projected fruit and vegetable intake figures. The model allowed the team to simulate the effects of different policies on eating habits.

[…]

So far, no national studies have been done looking at how financial incentives drive healthy eating, the researchers say. But a smaller study conducted in Massachusetts between 2011-2012 mirrored the findings of the modeling done at Tufts and Imperial College.

Most Urban Farmers Aren’t Making a Living (City Lab, 3/1)

DISTRICT/POVERTY
– Last month, panelists from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Children’s Law Center, DC Fiscal Policy Institute (DCFPI), and So Others Might Eat, spoke to WRAG members about the impact of proposed changes to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program on D.C. families. Now, Ed Lazere, executive director of the DCFPI, shares with Daily WRAG readers just what legislation to extend TANF could mean to so many households in the District. (Daily, 3/3)

– In their Matters@Hand thought leadership series sponsored by Enterprise Community Partners, HAND looks at the demographic and income data of newcomers to the District, and explores whether or not the city is currently able to accommodate those new residents. (Helping Hands Blog, 3/3)

HOUSING
America’s Insidious Eviction Problem (Atlantic, 3/1)

– A growing number of major U.S. cities are looking to micro apartments to bring about more affordable housing options, but not without some criticism. (New Yorker, 3/2)

TRANSIT/REGION
– Maryland Governor Larry Hogan has announced a winning bid to build and operate the Purple Line project. The light-rail line is expected to begin service in the spring of 2022. (WBJ, 3/2)

D.C. ranks high among the worst cities for commuting (WBJ, 3/3)


In Milwaukee, a potentially dark, sordid tale of a baseball-loving dog named Hank.

– Ciara

Very few U.S. neighborhoods are balanced

HOUSING
According to a recent analysis, just 14 percent of U.S. neighborhoods are considered “balanced” – meaning that they are both affordable and that they offer good quality public and private services. (WAMU, 1/27)

Across the country, just 14 percent of neighborhoods manage to be at once affordably priced, walkable and near decent schools. And many of those neighborhoods exist in only two cities: Washington and Seattle, according to a new analysis released Wednesday by the real estate brokerage Redfin.

The findings suggest a substantial mismatch between the neighborhoods where people say they want to live and the homes actually available to them.

– With a record number of Americans shelling out more than half of their incomes each month for rent, the urgent need for affordable housing is difficult to ignore. Enterprise Community Partners‘ Make Room campaign aims to bring awareness to the struggles of families who rent through private living room concerts, in the tradition of rent parties. (NPR, 1/27)

COMMUNITY
– David Biemesderfer, the new president and CEO of the Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers, shares why he is excited to take the helm of the growing organization and to support the work of WRAG and our regional association colleagues in his new role. (Daily, 1/27)

– The Community Foundation for Northern Virginia has released their third edition of GOOD BUSINESS, a publication that celebrates the impact of corporate giving in Northern Virginia and features stories of local businesses that practice corporate social responsibility in ways that benefit the local community. (CFNOVA, 1/26)

EDUCATION 
– Opinion: Natalie Wexler, education blogger/editor of Greater Greater Education and DC Eduphile, and trustee of the Omega Foundation, explores how the British government has been supporting an American education reform theory that has been slow to catch on right here in the U.S. (DC Eduphile, 1/19)

Lowering The Bar For The New GED Test (NPR, 1/27)

RACIAL EQUITY | If You Want Clean Water, Don’t Be Black in America (City Lab, 1/26)


Check out some real ingenuity when it comes to post-blizzard parking.

– Ciara

The links between the region’s economy and housing market

HOUSING/ECONOMY
In the final installment of the Matters@Hand thought-leadership series sponsored by Enterprise Community Partners, policy expert Lisa Sturtevant, PhD examines the current affordability of housing stock in the Greater Washington region and provides an assessment of the outlook for workers in the area. (Helping Hands Blog, 12/4)

Since 2014, the region’s housing market has cooled somewhat as a result of slower job growth and a restructuring of the region’s economy to include a greater share of jobs in the health and education services sectors—which have relatively lower wages—and a smaller share of Federal government jobs—which tend to have relatively higher wages. While home prices have continued to rise, price appreciation has been slower and sales activity has begun to moderate. The moderating housing market could be a sign that potential first-time homebuyers are not able to buy in the region. Losing these workers—and having difficulty attracting new workers because of high home prices and limited options—will be an added challenge to an already challenging, changing regional economy.

COMMUNITY | Ed Davies, executive director of the DC Trust, has been elected to serve on the governance committee of the Executives’ Alliance to Expand Opportunities for Boys and Men of Color, a network of the nation’s leading philanthropic organizations focused on improving life outcomes for minority males.

SOCIAL PROFITS/CSR | In his latest blog post, Tim McClimon, president of the American Express Foundation and head faculty member for the Institute for CSR, looks at the issue of higher-than-expected turnover rates for senior executives in the social profit sector based on a recent study by The Bridgespan Group. (American Express, 12/7)

VETERANS/VIRGINIA | Virginia announces free legal services program for low-income veterans (WTOP, 12/7)

EDUCATION
– A growing number of schools are looking beyond daily attendance rates to take a more data-driven and personalized approach to combat chronic absence – a strong indicator as to whether or not a student will eventually graduate. (NPR, 12/7)

– Opinion: Hungry, Homeless and in College (NYT, 12/4)

FOOD | The revolutionary technology helping to fight food waste (WaPo, 12/6)


Take this quiz and test your knowledge of worldwide winter holidays.

– Ciara

Big announcements from WRAG’s 2015 Annual Meeting

WRAG
Last week, WRAG held our 2015 Annual Meeting, Philanthropy All In, at the National Press Club. We made several big announcements during the event.

 

  • WRAG Board of Directors
    The following leaders were elected for a two-year term on the WRAG Board of Directors:

David Bowers, Enterprise Community Partners
Rose Ann Cleveland, The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Nicky Goren, The Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

The following Board  Members were re-elected for a second two-year term on the WRAG Board of Directors:

Lindsey Buss, World Bank Group
Desiree Griffin-Moore, The Community Foundation for Prince George’s County
Yanique Redwood, The Consumer Health Foundation

  • Get on the Map
    Members can now explore this new resource for accurate, timely, and quality data on philanthropy in the region.

HEALTH | For the first time, the Northern Virginia Health Foundation (NVHF) has awarded $125,000 to five organizations in the region that are working to address social determinants of health. Traditionally, NVHF has centered its grantmaking on organizations providing health care and other health services to low-income and uninsured residents. (NVHF, 11/19)

COMMUNITY | The Lever Fund has announced the hiring of their first executive director, Gregory M. Cork, along with their inaugural board of directors.

DISTRICT/EQUITY
– According to a Washington Post poll of D.C. residents, there is a strong racial divide in the attitudes Washingtonians have about redevelopment in the city and who benefits from it. The number of African American residents who were polled about whether or not they see redevelopment as negative for “people like them” has grown a great deal over the last several years. (WaPo, 11/20)

– The Urban Institute takes a moment to ponder what a more equitable D.C. might look like. (Urban Institute, 11/19)

EDUCATION/WORKFORCE | A report from the Washington Area Boards of Education finds disparities in the salaries of teachers in the region from district to district. The report highlights the challenges facing some districts in hiring and retaining talent. (WaPo, 11/22)


Have you read any of these picks for the best books of 2015?

-Ciara