Tag: DC

Decriminalizing sex work in the District

PUBLIC HEALTH/CRIMINAL JUSTICE | A coalition of sex workers and their advocates have introduced a bill, the Community Safety and Health Amendment Act of 2019, to decriminalize the sale and purchase of sex in the District. (CP, 6/3)

The world of people who sell sex for money in DC is not a monolith with one blanket policy need … among their ranks are those who sell sex by choice; those who sell sex to survive, feed their children, and stave off homelessness; and those who sell sex against their will because they’ve been trafficked. Under the current law in DC, police can arrest and charge anyone who sells sex and under this new bill, police would no longer have cause or power to employ this tactic for catching sellers of sex mid-sale—a change that many sex workers and their advocates enthusiastically endorse.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | Minneapolis ended exclusive single-family zoning. Could the DC region do the same? (WBJ, 6/6)

LGBTQIA | DC’s LGTBQIA communities continue to fight for some basic rights—and celebrate their victories, too. (CP, 6/6)

ENVIRONMENT
Key Urban Agriculture Programs Delayed as City Swaps Who Will Manage Them (CP, 6/7)

– Michael Bloomberg’s foundation said that he will donate $500 million to a new campaign to close every coal-fired power plant in the United States and halt the growth of natural gas. (NYT, 6/6)

MARYLAND | Residents voice concerns over Montgomery County policing (WTOP, 6/7)

DC/CULTURE | The DC Public Library is launching a three-part Go-Go Book Club, in collaboration with Washington Performing Arts and the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. (dcist, 6/6)

TRANSIT/CLIMATE | Maryland and Virginia plan to expand roads, in defiance of their own climate goals (GGWash, 6/6)

GENTRIFICATION | What’s In A Name? Residents East Of The Anacostia River Say, ‘Everything.’  (WAMU, 6/7)

PHILANTHROPY
– A new report,  Nonprofit Executives and the Racial Leadership Gap, details that people of color who lead nonprofits face barriers and challenges that their white counterparts don’t. (Chronicle, 6/4)

– Fund the People has launched the Talent Justice Initiative to help funders and nonprofits invest in intersectional racial equity across the nonprofit career lifecycle and workforce.

– Has the Giving Pledge Changed Giving? (Chronicle, 6/4)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Director | Open Society Institute-Baltimore – New!
Director, School Partnerships Coach | Flamboyan Foundation – New!
Senior Director of Development, Research & Innovation | Children’s Hospital Foundation – New!
Senior Program Manager | Rising Tide Foundation
Development Manager | Mikva Challenge DC
Foundation Director | Venable LLP
Development Associate | Sitar Arts Center
Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Blueberries all day, every day

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday!

– Buffy

Maryland to provide health insurance enrollment on tax forms

HEALTHCARE | Maryland is now the first state to let residents sign up for the state’s health insurance program when they file their taxes. Gov. Larry Hogan signed a bill Monday that allows residents to opt into health insurance by checking a box on their tax forms starting in 2020. (WAMU, 5/13)

The bill — which received bipartisan support in both chambers — will also increase spending on the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange by $1.2 million. Marylanders who don’t have insurance when they file their taxes can either pay a $695 penalty or put it towards enrolling in the lowest-cost insurance policy available. Should all go as planned during the 2020 tax season, Maryland could reduce its uninsured rate from 6.1 to 4.1 percent …  “we think this can be a model for the whole country” says Vinny DeMarco of the Maryland Citizens’ Health Initiative.

EDUCATION | Prince George’s County Interim Schools Chief Monica Goldson plans to give school employees $46.5 million in raises they missed in the aftermath of the recession. (WaPo, 5/14)

JUSTICE | A group of local activists bailed out Black moms incarcerated in Maryland and Virginia ahead of Mother’s Day, joining an annual nationwide campaign led by the National Bail Out collective, which aims to draw attention to issues of incarceration and cash bail. (WAMU, 5/10)

EQUITY/DC | The 11th Street Bridge Project has developed this short film about their approach to equitable development.

CHILDCARE | Some DC Lawmakers Are Asking If Every Family Should Get A Child Care Tax Credit (WAMU, 5/9)

GENTRIFICATION | Almost 3,000 people attended a block party protest in Shaw in response to the threats to Black DC culture posed by gentrification. (AfroPunk, 5/8)

TRANSPORTATION | Discussions continue over keeping the Circulator bus system free and who it benefits. (WaPo, 5/12)

HOUSING Montgomery County is aging, especially with younger seniors (GGWash, 5/7)

GUN VIOLENCE | Johns Hopkins University is aiming to capitalize on the student-led gun safety movement by offering a free online course to teach strategies to curb gun violence. (NPR, 5/13)

PHILANTHROPY | Giving Done Right: Effective Data For Philanthropy (Wesleyan University Magazine, 4/29)


Wow – at some point, there may be a car-free trail from DC to the Pacific Ocean.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday!

– Buffy

DC’s top education leaders trained to merge business concepts with equity in public education

EDUCATION/EQUITY | DC’s top three educational leaders – state superintendent Hanseul Kang, deputy mayor of education Paul Kihn, and acting schools chancellor Lewis Ferebee – have all studied at the Broad Center for the Management of School Systems, an educational leadership program that promotes a business perspective in the management of urban public school districts that has a focus on equity. Those who support the training program say it offers a unique corporate-like training experience, while critics say the teachings encourage school leaders to undermine democratic control of public education. (WAMU, 2/19)

Ferebee says it’s possible to merge these business concepts with equity in public education. “When you are studying leadership and change theory, there is a lot that you can learn from the business sector, and we obviously take advantage of that. [But] it’s not limited to business principles. Maximizing resources is obviously a part of the business community. Often times it is how you impact your bottom line. Maximizing your resources is also one way to address equity, ensuring that you get the most out of the public dollars you have access to.”

CENSUS | Communities of color and immigrants are at particular risk of being undercounted in the 2020 Census and the Virginia Legislature has recently stripped funds for Census outreach. (Commonwealth Institute, 2/14)

RACE | According to a just-released Goucher College poll, a majority of Maryland residents think race relations in the state have worsened in recent years. (WaPo, 2/18)

HEALTH | In honor of Presidents Day, the de Beaumont Foundation has released a quiz with interesting facts about US presidents and how their policy, advocacy, and private lives have influenced Americans’ health.

HOMELESSNESS | A challenge to Virginia’s ‘habitual drunkard’ law argues that it targets homeless people. (WaPo, 2/18)

WORKFORCE | A proposed bill currently being considered in Annapolis would phase out lower wages paid to tipped workers. (WAMU, 2/8)

ENVIRONMENT | If we don’t address climate change, DC weather will feel more like Mississippi in the next 60 years. (WAMU, 2/15)

NONPROFITS | Sometimes the best thing we donors can do to advance social justice is to just write the check and get out of the way (Nonprofit AF, 2/18)


Marylanders love our Old Bay – do you know what’s in it?

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

DC officials take steps to protect unpaid federal workers during shutdown

SHUTDOWN
– The DC Council passed emergency legislation on Tuesday to expand the safety net for unpaid federal employees and contractors during the partial government shutdown, and the Bowser administration is providing $2 million in emergency funds to help food stamp recipients. (WaPo, 1/23)

Mayor Muriel E. Bowser also announced she was introducing legislation to give the city authority to grant unemployment benefits to essential employees who must show up to work without pay, such as TSA airport screeners and special police. The U.S. Labor Department denied her request to authorize such benefits last week. “They are deemed essential, they are required to go to work, and they are not getting paid,” she said at a news conference at a warehouse for the Capital Area Food Bank, one of the charities ramping up services during the shutdown. “They provide some of the most vital services for us.”

– ‘Barely Treading Water’: Why The Shutdown Disproportionately Affects Black Americans (NPR, 1/14)

RACIAL EQUITY | The DC Council voted on Tuesday to override Mayor Muriel Bowser’s veto of its legislation decriminalizing fare evasion on Metro, arguing that Black residents are disproportionately impacted by fare evasion enforcement. (WaPo, 1/22)

HEALTH | Maryland could become the first state to put a cap on prescription drug costs by creating a state board tasked with limiting what people pay for prescriptions. (WAMU, 1/22)

EDUCATION | The Kirwan Commission approved a $3.8 billion increase in spending on public schools to make Maryland’s public schools some of the “best in the country.” (Sun, 1/18)

ENVIRONMENT | DC Mayor Muriel Bowser signed a sweeping clean energy law, requiring all of DC’s electricity to come from renewable sources such as wind and solar by 2032. (GGW, 1/22)

LGBTQIA | The Supreme Court has reinstated President Trump’s ban on transgender military service during a lower-court appeals process. (NPR, 1/22)

VIRGINIA
Equal Rights Amendment Proposal Fails To Advance In Virginia Legislature (WAMU, 1/22)

– Virginia lawmaker proposes legislation to help youth in foster care. (Inside Nova, 1/21)

PHILANTHROPY
– United Philanthropy Forum members are working to eliminate racism and advance racial equity, diversity and inclusion in philanthropy.

– A new Urban Institute report validates the recent Chronicle of Philanthropy findings that ranks greater DC as a place of exceptional giving, but also shows that there is considerable variation among giving patterns within the region. (Urban Institute, 12/21)


To help stem population decline, small towns around the world are offering homes to newcomers at almost no-cost – hellloooooo Australia!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Friday!

– Buffy

Gentrification Anxiety

We’re excited to introduce the second writer from our new WRAG Journalism Fellows program!


Jacqueline Lassey is an African-American student at Richard Wright Public Charter School in Washington, DC. She is an aspiring writer and athlete. As a member of the Library of Congress Teen Book Club, she recently had the opportunity to be published in the Library of Congress Magazine, page 16.

By Jacqueline Lassey

jackieA couple of years ago, my aunt was arrested for standing at a corner no more than fifty feet away from our house. She is well known and respected by longtime residents in our neighborhood and there were no previous legal actions or disputes against her. My aunt was there simply minding her business, not disrupting anyone. My new neighbors called the police because my aunt was “causing them anxiety.” I was too naive to understand what was really going on, I thought that it wasn’t anything serious. However I soon understood that my aunt was being antagonized for no reason. I know now that my aunt was being targeted because of her race.

I have lived in the Trinidad neighborhood of Washington DC for seventeen years. I have watched my neighborhood grow and develop. For the past two years I have seen my neighbors’ houses torn down and rebuilt from the ground up, and I have lost many of my closest friends because their parents sold their homes. They were dealing with rough patches in their finances and were swindled into selling for what they thought was the highest possible and best price for their houses; only to discover that with a little fixing, they could have made double what they sold their houses for.

When I think of gentrification, I think of it as the process of reconstructing urban neighborhoods so that more “prosperous” tenants can occupy the neighborhood. Since Caucasian people have moved into my neighborhood, I have seen the racial divide it has caused. They aren’t used to our environment and that causes many problems that affect us. My aunt was in her 50s at the time she was arrested but she was in no way dangerous to anyone. I came to understand this when my brother began to talk to my family about it. My brother is very open minded and he is not afraid to speak about what he sees. He talked to my family about injustice and how society is taking a turn for the worse. He talked about the changes our community was experiencing. Most importantly, he talked about how society’s stereotypes lead to racial bias. I’ve seen the racial division that gentrification brings.

Since then, I have noticed that many houses on my block are being redeveloped. The most notable occurrence of this was almost exactly one year ago. One of my friends, Fred, told me he was moving to Maryland. His house was redeveloped and is now worth $914,000.00 according to the Redfin listing. I have never heard of a house in my African-American neighborhood costing that much. This house could not be purchased by long-time residents living in my community. No one in my neighborhood has access to the jobs, or financial resources to purchase this house. Weeks later, the house had a buyer and I had a new neighbor. This new neighbor was white and male–and he doesn’t speak to us.

Realtors have been pursuing homeowners in my community and other urban communities all over the Washington, DC area. My mother receives weekly offers from real estate speculators (investors) to sell her house. Many of these solicitations offer immediate cash that can tempt the average homeowner to sell. As a result of these practices, many DC residents sell their homes for a much lower market value.

Gentrification causes a shortage of affordable housing in the District. As a result of these circumstances and tactics, I fear for my future as a DC resident. I am very concerned that one day I will not have the resources to live in the community that has raised me, or that my children will never experience the childhood that I experienced; a childhood that I love and cherish. This problem can be solved by an increased conversation in communities and the local government creating more affordable housing and better economic opportunities for all.

Eviction in DC: What is the Full Story?

By Tamara Lucas Copeland
President, Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

I’m still haunted by the August 9th Washington Post story, “Facing eviction over $25.” I just can’t get it out of my mind. How can a person be evicted for owing $25 in back rent, for walking a dog without a leash, or for the tragedy that her son used an unlicensed gun to commit suicide? The fact that they are all lease violations punishable by eviction still seems unfathomable and just plain wrong.

If you haven’t read the article, I would urge you to do so. It appeared to offer a powerful testimony to how structural racism plays out in the housing arena in the District of Columbia and, perhaps, across the country. Upon reading it, you might think that zoning commissions, wanting to increase property values, were allowing property owners to maximize profit by transitioning their property from low-income housing to housing that appeals to higher income residents, without sufficient consideration of how all people will be impacted. You might also think that court systems were allowing overly zealous landlords to utilize “the letter of the law” to evict tenants whose only true offense is that they’re poor. And, who do these actions most often affect in our region? Black and brown people.

But before you totally form your opinion on this particular situation, you must read the August 14th response from the owner of the property. He rebukes the primary focus of the article, by citing, very publicly, his company’s history vis-a-vis affordable housing and his company’s commitment to retaining affordable units in the future. Now what am I to think?

Some of the work that WRAG has done on structural racism has emphasized that far too often our public institutions legally, but, in my view, immorally, provide an advantage or disadvantage to one race of people over another. That occurred for decades with redlining, contributing to the wealth gap that persists today between black and white Americans. Is that the case in this situation?

What I have also learned from the hours of conversations and lectures about the dimensions of racism is that we all need to talk to each other more – really talk and really listen. And not only do we need to talk, we need to research to get to the bottom of situations. Assumptions and misunderstandings abound. Was that the case with aspects of the story about eviction at Brookland Manor in the District of Columbia? I don’t know.

What I do know is that every family deserves quality housing that they can afford. Every individual deserves to be treated humanely and fairly. The front page story and the subsequent rebuttal offer extraordinarily different views. The truth, I suspect, lies somewhere in there. We must be able to simultaneously recognize the devastation that eviction places on a family while acknowledging that a property owner does have the right to be paid. Stories like that of Brookland Manor are often the catalyst for reform. We must provide for affordable housing and we should improve areas that have long gone neglected in our region. I simply hope that those improvements can be guided by a moral compass while also grounded in financial reality.

Is that possible? It has to be.

Making solar power available to low-income DC residents

ENVIRONMENT/EQUITY | D.C., which is committed to getting half of its energy from renewable sources by 2032, has set aside almost a third of its funding for solar initiatives to specifically target low-income residents. Besides not having the considerable resources needed to access solar power, lower-income households often face energy bills that are disproportionately high (Atlantic, 7/26):

While the city’s highest-profile efforts have focused on the availability of housing, it is now devoting some attention to helping poorer households save money on their energy bills. Utility bills for low earners can eat up as much as 10 percent of household income, according to a report from Groundswell, a nonprofit focused on energy issues. For the highest 20 percent of earners, utilities make up less than 2 percent of expenditures. But it’s not just a matter of percentages: Poorer families actually tend to have higher utilities bills, usually because their homes are less energy-efficient. On average, a monthly utility bill cost an American household around $115 in 2013, by Groundswell’s calculations, but poorer families were significantly more likely to have bills that topped $200 every month.

EDUCATION | The new head of Montgomery County Public Schools, Jack Smith, sees the racial achievement gap as being the most critical challenge facing the county’s school system. (WaPo, 7/26)

HEALTH | The DC Department of Health launched a pilot program earlier this year to make a life-saving drug that reverses the effects of opioid overdoses called Narcan available to drug users, but so far demand for the drug has far outstripped supply. (CP, 7/21)

EARLY ED/WORKFORCE/EQUITY | A new report finds that, thanks to extremely low pay, nearly half of the country’s childcare workers receive some form of government assistance. (WaPo, 7/11)

HOMELESSNESS | Homeless in relentless heat (WaPo, 7/26)

NONPROFITS | Opinion: New Overtime Rules Are Good for Nonprofits — and Good for America (Chronicle, 7/26)

GIVING | Giving Up Only Slightly in First Half of 2016, Report Says (Chronicle, 7/26)


Oh how lovely.

-Rebekah

P.S. The (Almost) Daily will be back on Friday.

Reported HIV cases decrease for seventh year in a row

HIV/AIDS
According to a new report released by the D.C. Department of Health, the number of reported annual new HIV cases is down for the seventh consecutive year. (DCist, 2/2)

The report shows preliminary data for 2014, which includes 396 new HIV cases – a 29 percent decrease from the 553 cases reported in 2013. The highest number of HIV cases was reported in 2007 with 1,333 cases. Since then, numbers are down by 70 percent.

Executive director of the Washington AIDS Partnership, Channing Wickham, had this to say of the news:

I’m very pleased to see the hard work of the nonprofit community, the D.C. Department of Health, and the HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB Administration (HAHSTA) reflected in the latest data for new HIV cases.  At the same time, it’s imperative to remember the thousands of District residents who are living with HIV and the need to continue and expand HIV prevention efforts.

REGION/ECONOMY | A new study by the Brookings Institution ranks the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria area against 99 other metro regions in the U.S. in terms of recovery from the Great Recession. The study rates the D.C. area’s performance as: 71st in “growth;” 91st in “prosperity;” 72nd in “inclusion;” and 77th in “inclusion by race.” (DCist, 2/2)

HOUSING/DISTRICT | Some 7,300 households rely on public housing in the District. With a number of public housing properties slated for overdue rehabilitation or replacement, DC Fiscal Policy Institute shares some of the risks this could cause for families who may be displaced, and offers recommendations for their protection. (DCFPI, 1/27)

WORKFORCE/SOCIAL PROFITS | Hiring Keeps Rising at Nonprofits in N.Y and D.C., Study Says (Chronicle, 2/2)  Subscription required

YOUTH/EDUCATION
– The District and the D.C. Public Library have announced a new program, Books from Birth, that will send enrolled children a book every month until the age of five. The program is a partnership between the city and the Dollywood Foundation. (WCP, 2/2)

How Rich Parents Can Exacerbate School Inequality (Atlantic, 1/28)

ARTS/RACIAL EQUITY | Opinion: A writer shares his experiences witnessing slotting, tokenism, and dehumanization in the nonprofit theater sector. (NPQ, 1/29)

POVERTY | OpinionWhat Data Can Do To Fight Poverty (NYT, 1/29)


The Washingtonian presents a guide to successfully living in Washington, D.C.

– Ciara

Muriel Bowser wins primary election that most people didn’t vote in

DISTRICT | If you’re just waking up, or crawling out from under a rock with no cell service, D.C. Council member Muriel Bowser won the Democratic mayoral primary last night. The Post has some interesting graphics breaking down the results based on race and income that show the city is still starkly divided. Unfortunately (depending on your faith in the democratic process), only a small fraction of the 370,000 eligible voters actually voted. (WaPo, 4/1)

ENVIRONMENT | Residents of Ivy City, a neighborhood in northeast D.C., argue that they have long experienced environmental injustice, as the city uses the area to house buses, causing a disproportionate amount of air pollution (WAMU, 3/28):

A coalition of researchers from the University of Maryland, George Washington, Howard and Trinity universities has studied air quality in this neighborhood, and says the main culprit is something called PM 2.5.

PM 2.5 stands for “particulate matter” smaller than 2.5 micrometers in size, small enough to penetrate the deepest parts of human lungs. PM 2.5 is also the main ingredient of smog, and exhaust from diesel vehicles — trucks and buses — is a major source of the pollutant.

Sacoby Wilson teaches at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Health. He says over the years Ivy City has seen more than its fair share of heavy duty traffic and industry.

“They share a disproportionate burden of these facilities right now. They share a disproportionate burden of diesel vehicles right now. So from an environmental justice perspective, you see that this community — many [residents] are low-income, many are people of color — they’re disproportionately burdened by these hazards,” Wilson says.

HEALTHCARE
Maryland officials have decided to replace their “troubled” (I’ve noticed this seems to be the media’s adjective of choice) health insurance exchange with Connecticut’s system, which is not troubled. (WaPo, 4/1)

More than 7 million have enrolled under Affordable Care Act, White House says​ (WaPo, 4/1)

Virginia Lawmakers Still Stuck On Medicaid Expansion (WAMU, 4/2)

SOCIAL IMPACT BONDS | Last week, WRAG member CEOs convened to learn more about social impact bonds and the potential they offer for moving significant amounts of capital toward hard-to-address issues. Tamara explains the argument for funders getting involved with these new forms of social finance. (Daily, 4/2)

TRANSIT
– The Purple Line will better connect commuters with jobs in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties, but local jurisdictions will need to prioritize maintaining the affordability of housing and small businesses close to the transit corridor. (GGW, 4/2)

– Prince George’s County officials have announced their intention to promote transit-oriented development around 5 metro stations in the county. (WaPo, 3/31)

POVERTY | Women’s Wages Are Rising: Why Are So Many Families Getting Poorer? (Atlantic, 4/1)


As with throwing boiling water in the air during a polar vortex, just because reporters repeatedly bang a bottle of wine against the wall to drive Internet traffic to their site doesn’t mean you should try it too.

– Rebekah

Why should you care about D.C. voting rights?

By Tamara Copeland, President

You don’t live in the District, so why should you care?

First and foremost, you should care because you are an American. Not only a Virginian or a Marylander, but an American. It’s really that simple. In the mid-1700s, British colonists in America questioned the right of the Crown to tax them if they weren’t going to be represented in the British Parliament. “No taxation without representation” became the refrain and the energy behind the American Revolution. We all learned that in American history class. Unfortunately, many seem to have forgotten representation as a founding tenet of our country since they don’t speak up for the rights of the 600,000 citizens of the District of Columbia just because they don’t live there.

If democratic principles don’t resonate with you, what about economic vitality, gridlock, and the Chesapeake Bay?

Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell recently said, “It is in both Virginia and Maryland’s best interest that the District be able to operate without interruption, resulting in the financial certainty that will enable long term planning and better regional cooperation.” Businesses thrive on certainty. Because the D.C. budget is really not its own, businesses sometimes find it hard to do business with the District government. This doesn’t just affect the city.

The long term planning and regional cooperation of which Governor McDonnell spoke is minimized by the fact that Mayor Gray is unable to act with Governor McDonnell and Governor O’Malley as an equal. He does not have comparable influence over his jurisdiction’s budget. The District’s budget is subject to Congressional oversight, oversight by individuals who may live in the jurisdiction part-time, but certainly aren’t of the community.

But that’s not the biggest problem. The biggest problem is regional clout in the halls of Congress. When the region looks for federal dollars to support the regional infrastructure or our regional assets, our power is less than that of other parts of the country. Take Amtrak and Metro, for example. A recent article in the Washington City Paper suggested that the region had lost at least $12M in federal transportation dollars for a series of Union Station access and capacity improvements specifically because the District doesn’t have adequate power in the House and no representation at all in the Senate. Some suggest that the Council of Governments lost a recent HUD grant competition that would have enabled some of the Region Forward work because there was inadequate representation for the region in Congress. And many suggest that the Chesapeake Bay cleanup efforts would benefit from two more senators speaking out for our region.

The Virginia delegation has Virginia’s interests at heart. The Maryland Congressional delegation looks out for Maryland. But there is a huge gap where the District delegation should be, and because of that gap there is no opportunity for a trio of delegations to collectively represent what many are coming to call the DMV – our region.

So whether you live in Maryland, Virginia or the District of Columbia, the District should matter to you. We are one region. Our worlds are interconnected. The DMV will stand stronger and taller when the District has voting rights in Congress.