Tag: Crimsonbridge Foundation

DC public housing stock deteriorating due to funding shortfall

HOUSING | That big thunderstorm earlier this week blew a section of roof off a public housing complex in DC, underscoring the DC Housing Authority’s financial shortfall and the dire need for maintenance and upgrades in much of the city’s public housing (WAMU, 8/18):

DCHA — which has 56 properties that are home to about 20,000 people — says it’s short $1.3 billion it needs to maintain, rehabilitate and redevelop 6,500 of the 8,300 housing units it manages… Housing advocates say the funding shortfalls can have big impacts. Public housing residents are more likely to live in substandard conditions, and when conditions become critical, those units could be evacuated altogether. And in cities where affordable housing is at a premium, like D.C., that’s not a good thing. According to DCHA, there are 27,000 people on the waiting list for public housing. Advocates say that every unit taken offline because of deferred maintenance can mean one more family closer to homelessness.

RACE
– In Maryland, none of the 15 companies selected for medical marijuana growing licenses are led by African-Americans. (WaPo, 8/18)

– A task force in Alexandria recommends changing the name of the stretch of U.S. Route 1 currently known as the Jefferson Davis Highway, but maintaining a Confederate memorial statue in Old Town. (WaPo, 8/18)

EQUITY | Why the Olympics and other major sporting events usually increase inequality in the host city (Ford Foundation, 8/1)

PHILANTHROPY
– Danielle Reyes of the Crimsonbridge Foundation explains how foundations can maximize their impact with an effective communications strategy, in a co-authored post on the Exponent Philanthropy blog. (EP, 8/15)

Another Foundation Goes All In on Equity—Not Only the What and Why, But the How (NPQ, 8/18)


Jobs
Analyst | Arabella Advisors – New!
Operations Associate | ACT for Alexandria – New!
Grants Coordinator | City of Takoma Park
Development Associate | Washington Area Women’s Foundation
Program Assistant | The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar – September 2016
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to seder@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Meet Pedals, the bipedal black bear and possibly your new spirit animal. 

– Rebekah

Grantmakers share how nonprofits can deepen relationships beyond dollars

By Hudson Kaplan-Allen
WRAG’s 2016 Summer Intern

The second in WRAG’s Nonprofit Summer Learning Series, “Navigating the Grants Process: From Initial Contact to Long-Term Partnership,” focused on how nonprofit organizations can build and maintain strong and positive relationships with their funders after receiving a grant. The session was led by the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia’s (CFNV) president, Eileen Ellsworth, and featured a panel of experienced grantmaking professionals from across the Greater Washington region.

Ellsworth started the discussion by asking one of CFNV’s grantees to speak about her organization’s experience throughout the grant process. Jessica Fuchs from Serving Together shared her nonprofit’s relationship over the years with CFNV and made the point that, while the funding has been extremely helpful, “it’s really about the connections the [Community Foundation] has helped make.” She emphasized that the support and partnership CFNV has provided has helped validate and promote Serving Together’s work to other funders, individual donors, and the general public, and has helped expand the organization’s reach as a nonprofit organization.

The panelists — Timothy McCue of the Potomac Health Foundation, Danielle Reyes of the Crimsonbridge Foundation, and Naomi Smouha of Capital One — shared insights into the grantmaking process and gave examples of strong nonprofit relationships they have formed in their time as grantmakers. All of the panelists agreed that they find it important both to compare notes and best practices with their grantmaker peers and network within the nonprofit world to find the best partners.

Smouha compared the process to dating, pointing out that it’s smart to go on a few dates and get an idea of who she is working with before she “brings you home to mom.” Every quarter, Capital One hosts one-hour information sessions to allow potential grantees to get an idea of the partnerships they are looking for. They want to make sure they are being completely transparent every step of the way.

Reyes pointed out the importance of nonprofit organizations using Twitter to form connections with funders. At Crimonsonbridge, one of the ways they look to see who wants to partner with them is by checking their Twitter feed and followers. She uses the social media platform to research whose work best fits the foundation’s mission. “We don’t just follow back anyone,” she said.

All of the funders drove home the importance of developing and maintaining an honest and open relationship. “Don’t wait to tell your funder that something is going awry with one of your projects,” said McCue. “Be forthcoming with them.” On top of that, nonprofits are often tempted to follow the money. Instead, McCue said, organizations should be sure to stick with their missions. All three panelists said they use interim or progress reports to check-in with their grantees and make sure they are on track with their projects. If a nonprofit hits a roadblock and decides to change their approach after receiving a grant, they should be open with their funder about the changes. If you go through a staff turnover at your organization, give your funder a heads up that you are going through a transition, said Reyes. “Nonprofits should look at their funders beyond just a dollar relationship,” she said. Explore the partnership by asking questions and being open to suggestions. The next in the Nonprofit Summer Series, “Having Tough Conversations with Your Funder,” on August 19, will address the ways that some of these more difficult conversations between grantmakers and grantees can be resolved and can be used to deepen the relationship.

For some, disparities in access to work benefits

WORKFORCE/RACIAL EQUITY
A new study from the Center for American Progress finds dramatic disparities in African American and Latino workers’ access to flexible work schedules, paid leave, and vacation in comparison to their white counterparts. (HuffPo, 4/27)

[…]  when you compare a Latino worker with a white worker who is otherwise identical when it comes to educational attainment, type of job and earnings, the Latino worker is still less likely to have access to paid leave.

“This, to me, indicates that it’s not about trying harder, working harder, or going back to school to get a better job,” [report co-author, Sarah Jane] Glynn said. “This is someone’s ethnicity: They can’t work harder to get better access, it appears to be stacked against them.”

HOMELESSNESS 
– A report from the Downtown Business Improvement District on the state of downtown D.C.’s real estate and economic activity finds that, while the area added jobs, office vacancy rates rose, downtown residency declined, and the number of people experiencing homelessness increased citywide (WCP, 4/27)

– More Funding Needed to End Chronic Homelessness (DCFPI, 4/27)

COMMUNITY
– The Crimsonbridge Foundation and the Georgetown Center for Public & Nonprofit Leadership (CPNL) have launched a new scholarship fund aimed at developing the leadership of Greater Washington region social profit organizations. The Crimsonbridge Leadership Fund will provide scholarships to CPNL’s Nonprofit Management Executive Certificate Program for leaders at locally-based and locally-serving organizations. Applications are due by May 2. More information can be found here. Contact the Center for Public & Nonprofit Leadership with any questions at npmcert@georgetown.edu or (202) 687-5541.

– The DC Trust has announced their FY16 Summer Strong DC grant competition. High-performing, social profit youth development organizations in D.C. that serve youth between the ages of 5 and 24 with programming that addresses key developmental outcomes can apply for summer program funding.

HEALTH
– Brian Castrucci, Chief Program and Strategy Officer of the de Beaumont Foundation, candidly shares his personal health challenges and progression in order to shed light on the privileges that afford some people the opportunity to improve their circumstances, while others have very limited options. (HuffPo, 4/26)

Whitman-Walker releases details on 14th Street project (WBJ, 4/27)

MASS INCARCERATIONWhen Parents Are in Prison, Children Suffer (NYT, 4/26)

ARTS | A global art movement is headed to D.C.’s NoMa neighborhood, featuring murals by local and international artists. (Washingtonian, 4/27)

PHILANTHROPY
– Center for Effective Philanthropy president Phil Buchanan writes about the five most pressing issues he sees facing U.S. foundation leaders and their boards. (CECP, 4/28)

–  A New Website Serves Up 500 Years of Philanthropic History (Chronicle, 4/26) Subscription required.


A professor wants to make you feel better about yourself through his non-traditional CV.

– Ciara

New DCFPI report highlights need for education and training reforms

ECONOMY/DISTRICT
A new report by the DC Fiscal Policy Institute (DCFPI) looks at the challenges facing D.C. residents with lower levels of education in a growing economy. With unemployment highest among those without a college degree, the report, and some city officials, look toward expanding job training opportunities and a higher minimum wage as a way to weaken disparities. (WaPo, 10/15)

Although wages have increased for college-educated residents, they have dropped for those with only a high school diploma. “Wages have fallen $2 an hour since 1980 for residents with a high school diploma, to just $13 an hour for the typical worker,” the report says. Over the same period, the pay for college-educated residents rose by $4.50 an hour, adjusted for inflation.

You can access the full report by DCFPI, “Two Paths to Better Jobs for DC Residents: Improved Training and Stronger Job Protections,”  here.

HOUSING
As D.C.’s Congress Heights neighborhood makes big plans for redevelopment, many longtime residents grow concerned about what the rapid changes will mean for their own futures. (WaPo, 10/15)

–  The Fundamental Contradictions of U.S. Housing Policy (City Lab, 10/14)

IMMIGRATION/VIRGINIA | In this article detailing the plight of unaccompanied minors who have been sent to live in the U.S., Virginia  is highlighted as just one example of the ways in which states vary widely on laws pertaining to their well-being. (Atlantic, 10/15)

COMMUNITY | Danielle Reyes has been named as the first-ever executive director for the Crimsonbridge Foundation based in Bethesda, MD. (WBJ, 10/14)

ARTS
– The Cultural Data Project, which many local arts organizations are familiar with as the online tool used to track financial, operations, and financial data, is re-branding as DataArts. Check out their press release to learn more.

– After 20 years in its current location, the Goethe-Institut Washington will move to a new home in D.C. The German cultural center cites rising rental costs as the reason behind the move. (WCP, 10.13)

ENVIRONMENT | How Green Can the District Grow (Elevation, 10/6)

SOCIAL PROFITS | ProInspire, a social profit, leadership development organization, is launching an executive coaching program for leaders at social sector organizations in Washington, D.C. Click here to learn more about the program. 


For today’s history lesson – How did these Bethesda neighborhoods get their names?

– Ciara