Tag: Council on Foundations

New report reveals the drivers of racial disparities in health outcomes in D.C.

RACIAL EQUITY
– A new report from Georgetown’s School of Nursing & Health Studies reveals major disparities in health outcomes between D.C.’s African American and white residents, and provides recommendations on how the city can better address the structural nature of health inequities. (GU, 6/28) From the executive summary:

While citywide efforts are underway to streamline how healthcare services are organized and delivered, the benefit of this approach on the overall health of the African American community may be marginal. An explicit focus on historically embedded social, economic, political, and environmental injustices that disproportionately impact persons of color is needed. Examples include employing a racial equity approach when conducting community health needs assessments with a goal of uncovering and eliminating systemic barriers that perpetuate segregation, neighborhood disinvestment, and inequitable distribution of resources. Public and private partnerships that examine how planning efforts, policies and business decisions disproportionately impact African American residents are needed.

Click here for the full report, which was developed by Christopher King, assistant professor in the School of Nursing & Health Studies and member of the Consumer Health Foundation‘s board of directors.

– Data from the Brookings Institution show how the millennial and post-millennial generations are driving the increase in racial diversity across the country. (Brookings, 6/28)

Related: Last week we released the second-to-last video in WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series. USC professor Manuel Pastor discusses the implications of these demographic changes and the urgent need to invest in racial equity.

EDUCATION 
– Data from the D.C. Public Charter School Board show that, on average, charter school students travel 2.1 miles from home to school. (WCP, 6/28)

– Montgomery County Public Schools’ new superintendent, Jack Smith, is getting to work. (WaPo, 6/29)

Can ‘early warning systems’ keep children from dropping out of school? (WaPo, 6/29)

WORKFORCE | D.C.’ s ‘fair scheduling’ labor bill hits a hiccup, but proponents still hopeful (WaPo, 6/29)

POVERTY | A series on WAMU this week focused on poverty is highlighting a nonprofit organization in Fort Worth, TX, that is taking an innovative and personal approach to helping individuals get out of poverty. Click here and here for stories. (WAMU, 6/28-29)

HOUSING | Most Americans Think the Housing Crisis Never Ended (City Lab, 6/28)

WRAG MEMBERS | This year, WRAG is partnering with the Council on Foundations to encourage participation in the 2016 Grantmakers Salary and Benefits Survey, a valuable benchmarking tool designed to collect compensation data for positions at community, private (family and independent), and public foundations, and other staffed grantmaking entities. This annual survey is one of the most important and effective resources for our members and we encourage you to participate. To learn more and take the survey contact research@cof.org.


It probably comes as no surprise that a Twinkie unwrapped 40 years ago looks pretty much the same today.

– Rebekah

Friday roundup – June 13 through June 17, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG
– The Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation has made a $500,000 investment in Our Region, Your Investment. (Daily, 6/16)

– The Putting Racism on the Table learning series may be over, but the lessons will endure. In this blog post, Julie Wagner of CareFirst and Terri Copeland of PNC shared some of their deepest insights and major takeaways from the series. (Daily, 6/13)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– Natalie Wexler, trustee of the Omega Foundation, explained how schools can better teach kids to read. (Hint: it’s not by teaching reading comprehensive strategies.) (Daily, 6/14)

– Some Alexandria City Public School students are alleging  “excessive, discriminatory and reckless approach[es] to discipline” from the school system. The Kojo Nnamdi Show explores those claims and the supporting research behind the students’ argument. (WaPo, 6/3 and WAMU, 6/16)

THIS WEEK IN LGBT NEWS/THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
– The Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers will be co-hosting a national teleconference for funders on Wednesday, June 22 at 11:00 am ET, for funders concerned about the Orlando tragedy and how best they may respond. Register for the call co-hosted by ABFE, Funders for LGBTQ Issues, Change Philanthropy, AAPIP, and Hispanics in Philanthropy.

– WRAG’s colleague organization, the Florida Philanthropic Network, posted a list of resources for those who want to provide financial assistance to those affected by the mass shooting in Orlando.

Wells Fargo announced a donation of $300,000 toward victims and community recovery through the OneOrlando fund, set up by the City of Orlando and administered by the Central Florida Foundation.

– The Council on Foundations shared a resource guide created by Funders for LGBTQ Issues featuring Orlando’s local LGBTQ social profit organizations and fundraising efforts for victims.

– The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region has also shared resources for those who want to help.


JOBS

Senior Manager, Programs | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations | Deadline: 06/17/2016
Program Officer | Washington Area Women’s Foundation | Deadline: 06/19/2016
Associate | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Research Assistant | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Philanthropic Services Associate | The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
Grants Manager | The Norman & Ruth Rales Foundation
Community Impact Director | Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing
Senior Communication Consultant | Kaiser Permanente
Part Time Bookkeeper/Accountant | ACT for Alexandria
Associate Director | Arabella Advisors
Director, Corporate Philanthropy | Council on Foundations
D.C. PrEP for Women Project Coordinator | Washington AIDS Partnership
Visit WRAG’s Job Board for the latest job openings in the region’s social sector.

WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


This just may be the sweetest Internet search ever conducted.

– Ciara

New report closely examines racial and ethnic incarceration disparities in each state

MASS INCARCERATION/RACISM
A new report examines the rates of incarceration for whites, African Americans, and Hispanics state-by-state, finds three contributing factors to the racial and ethnic disparities in those rates, and makes some recommendations for reform. (Sentencing Project, 6/14)

Truly meaningful reforms to the criminal justice system cannot be accomplished without acknowledgement of racial and ethnic disparities in the prison system, and focused attention on reduction of disparities. Since the majority of people in prison are sentenced at the state level rather than the federal level, it is critical to understand the variation in racial and ethnic composition across states, and the policies and the day-to-day practices that contribute to this variance. Incarceration creates a host of collateral consequences that include restricted employment prospects, housing instability, family disruption, stigma, and disenfranchisement.

Related: In the most recently released video of WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series, James Bell, J.D., founder and executive director of the W. Haywood Burns Institute, discussed mass incarceration and how structural racism, white privilege, and implicit bias collide within the criminal justice system.

OUR REGION, YOUR INVESTMENT | Our Region, Your Investment is gaining traction with local investors, with a recent $500,000 investment from the Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation. Says Joshua Bernstein, president of the foundation (Daily, 6/16):

The Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation is working to address the deficit in housing affordability in the D.C. area. An investment in the Enterprise Community Impact Note aligns our investment strategy with our mission and leverages our impact.  We are grateful for the opportunity that Our Region, Your Investment has created to invest funds in ways that promote additional investment in housing solutions.

COMMUNITY/LGBT/PHILANTHROPY | Following the recent tragedy in Orlando, a number of WRAG members have organized efforts to provide support to victims and their families or share valuable resources with those serving LGBT communities. Wells Fargo has announced a donation of $300,000 toward victims and community recovery through the OneOrlando fund, set up by the City of Orlando and administered by the Central Florida Foundation. The Council on Foundations has shared a resource guide created by Funders for LGBTQ Issues featuring Orlando’s local LGBTQ social profit organizations and fundraising efforts for the victims, and the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region has also shared resources for those who want to help.

EDUCATION/DISCRIMINATION/VIRGINIA | Students at Alexandria’s public schools are bringing to light what they describe as “excessive, discriminatory and reckless approach[es] to discipline” from the school system. Today, The Kojo Nnamdi Show explores those claims and the research that supports their argument. (WaPo, 6/3 and WAMU, 6/16)

Related: On Thursday, July 7, the third installment of WRAG’s Public Education Speaker Series (supported by The Omega Foundation and the Tiger Woods Foundation) tackles the topic of racial and gender disparities in school discipline, with Professor Anne Gregory of Rutgers University. WRAG members can click here to register.

ARTS/CULTURE African American Museum prepares for ‘a mini-inauguration’ (WaPo, 6/15)

PUBLIC HEALTHGun Violence ‘A Public Health Crisis,’ American Medical Association Says (NPR, 6/14)


Going back to school is tough at any age, but imagine going back to the 10th grade at age 68! This grandfather shows us it’s never too late.

– Ciara

Efforts to shed light on housing affordability in the region and beyond

HOUSING
Over the past six months, Leadership Greater Washington, in partnership with WRAG, has hosted a thought-leadership series on housing affordability. Last week’s session on regional solutions featured the Roadmap for Our Region’s Economic Future, the Greater Washington Housing Leaders Group, and WRAG’s Our Region, Your Investment initiative – all efforts in which WRAG is very involved. The Washington Post published a story on the importance of housing affordability to our region and focused specifically on the work of the Greater Washington Housing Leaders Group. (WaPo, 5/28)

[…] a group of local leaders representing government, business and the philanthropic sector is studying whether to propose a “regional compact” in which the Washington area as a whole would commit to addressing runaway housing costs.

If nothing is done, they warn, the problem of overpriced housing will fester until it eventually explodes into a widely recognized crisis — much as the Metro transit system’s problems were ignored for years until they recently triggered a burst of attention.

Gretchen Greiner-Lott, who leads these efforts for WRAG, had this to say of the coverage:

Solving big issues takes collaboration. The Greater Washington Housing Leaders Group is just that – a regional, cross-sector collaboration of committed folks working on the issue. I am so pleased to see our work highlighted in the media.

– A new report released by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, along with an interactive website supported by JPMorgan Chase, provide a close look at the disparity between rental housing costs and renter income in every jurisdiction in the U.S. In order to be able to afford a modest, two-bedroom apartment in D.C., one would need to earn $31.21 an hour; $26.53 an hour in Maryland; and $22.44 an hour in Virginia. (NLIHC, 5/25)

– A new report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities examines a decline in federal support for housing aid for families with children. Despite the damaging effects of the Great Recession to many families with children, the share of federal housing assistance that went to those families declined over the last several years. (City Lab, 5/26)

COMMUNITY 
– The Council on Foundations recently named Floyd Mills as its Vice President of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. This role is a new position “intended to advance the Council’s work to promote inclusiveness as a fundamental operating principal in philanthropic organizations.” (COF, 5/23)

– Trustee, member of the board of directors, and Veterans Liaison for the PwC Charitable Foundation, Frank Guadio, recently sat with The Huffington Post to discuss best practices for collaboration on issues related to veterans. (HuffPo, 5/25)

REGION
– An annual ranking by the Trust for the Public Land places D.C. at number three and Arlington at number four on its list of the best U.S. cities for parks. Factors to determine the ranking included: accessibility; amenities; size; and the amount of money spent per resident on parks. (WaPo, 5/26)

– Loudoun County Reportedly the “Happiest” County in America (Washingtonian, 5/31)


A new art exhibit appeals to the procrastinator and/or perfectionist in all of us. 

– Ciara

Undocumented students face challenges heading to college

It’s all hands on deck for the Fundamentals of CSR tomorrow. The Daily will return on Friday!

EDUCATION
For many students preparing to graduate from high school, figuring out how to pay for college can be challenging. For undocumented students, being ineligible for federal loans or grants can make those challenges seem insurmountable. (WaPo, 4/11)

It’s an uncertainty that many undocumented students confront during their senior year in high school as they are crossing over from one world to the next. They are moving from a childhood when they had a right to attend public school, where teachers promised that they could achieve anything with enough hard work, to an adulthood where their legal status stands directly in the way of opportunities, including not just federal student loans but also driver’s licenses, certain academic fellowships and jobs.

– Why Do Some Poor Kids Thrive? (Atlantic, 4/6)

COMMUNITY/WRAG/ENVIRONMENT | In an update to WRAG’s Beyond Dollars report originally published in 2009, former managing director Kristin Pauly of The Prince Charitable Trusts shares the latest on their efforts to help protect a cultural and environmental asset in Virginia, and presents a new documentary on the fight, When Mickey Came to Town. (Daily, 4/13)

PHILANTHROPY
In their final annual report on the state of diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy, the D5 Coalition shares the voices of leaders in the field and their stories of progress in the struggle to create a more equitable sector. (D5, 4/12)

Opinion: In light of the Council on Foundations’ 2016 annual conference addressing a lack of diversity and inclusion in philanthropy, Council president and CEO Vikki Spruill and Hispanics in Philanthropy president Diana Campoamor recommend strategies for addressing underrepresentation in the sector. (NPQ, 4/7)

Opinion: Pablo Eisenberg, senior fellow at the Center for Public and Nonprofit Leadership at Georgetown University, discusses why he believes that philanthropy further exacerbates wealth inequality in America, and what he sees as a “culture of silence” in the philanthropic community. (Chronicle, 4/11) – Audio

CHILDREN/DISTRICTWho Pays the Price When Child Care Assistance Is Too Low? (CCN, 4/9)

VIRGINIA/ECONOMYWhy Virginia is shaking up its economic development strategy (WBJ, 4/12


Who better to review the best playgrounds in D.C. than an 8-year-old child?

– Ciara

Housing tops list of worries for low-income D.C. residents

POVERTY/HOUSING
In a new report, researchers surveyed more than 600 low-income District residents to examine their most persistent stressors. Survey results revealed that, by far, most poor residents found issues surrounding housing to be their biggest source of anxiety. (WaPo, 4/4)

The main takeaway: Finding and keeping affordable housing is by far the dominant stress among low-income residents — more so than concerns about food, education or domestic violence.

[…]

Sixty percent of respondents said they worried about not having any housing in the future.

– How the Federal Government Plans to Stop the ‘Worst-Case’ Housing Crisis (City Lab, 4/4)

COMMUNITY
– Jeanné Isler of the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy (NCRP) shares a recent conversation with WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland on WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series, and NCRP’s enthusiasm about what lies ahead beyond the series. (NCRP, 4/5)

– Congratulations to Amy Owen of the Community Foundation for Loudoun & Northern Fauquier Counties on being one of the Loudoun Times-Mirror’s 16 Women To Watch in 2016!

ARTS
– Brookland in northeast D.C. will soon have its own Arts Park, with support from corporations and donors, including  the D.C. Commission on the Arts & Humanities. (WCP, 4/4)

– Following a big revival in 2012, the Howard Theater continues to face struggles with financial woes. (WaPo, 4/4)

– With Studio Space Scarce In D.C., Fillmore School Building To Offer Reprieve (WAMU, 4/5)

SOCIAL PROFITS | Exponent Philanthropy makes the case for funders to invest in social profit sector talent in order to yield greater results on performance and impact. (Philanthrofiles, 4/5)

VIRGINIA | Though Fairfax County remains one of the nation’s wealthiest counties, it has been unable to avoid the pitfalls of a stagnant local economy amid an influx of new, often lower-income, residents. (WaPo, 4/2)

HEALTH/RACISMThe disturbing reason some African American patients may be undertreated for pain (WaPo, 4/4)

JOBS | The Council on Foundations is hiring for the position of Director, Corporate Philanthropy. Find out more here!


Oopsie!

– Ciara

Friday roundup – February 29 through March 4, 2016

THIS WEEK IN THE DISTRICT/POVERTY
– Ed Lazere, executive director of the DCFPI, shared with us what legislation to extend TANF could mean to a number of households in the District. (Daily, 3/3)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– Following the launch of WRAG’s 2016 Public Education Speaker Series last week with Dr. Matthew Biel, Director of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Georgetown University Medical Center, speaking on the impact of toxic stress on children’s development, we shared some of his compelling points. (Daily 2/29)

THIS WEEK IN PHILANTHROPY
– The Executives’ Alliance for Boys & Men of Color announced the ‘Ban the Box Philanthropy Challenge,’ calling for U.S. philanthropic institutions to adopt fair chance hiring policies. Participating and supporting organizations include: Butler Family Fund, Consumer Health Foundation, Council on FoundationsOpen Society Foundations, and Public Welfare Foundation.

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS
– The Theatre Communications Group is taking nominations for D.C. area early-career leaders of color in social-profit theater to participate in their Rising Leaders of Color program, designed to “change the face of the theatre field by nurturing and supporting an inter-generational network of leaders of color at various stages in their careers.”

THIS WEEK IN FOOD
– Researchers have created a tool, called the U.S. IMPACT Food Policy Model, that demonstrates how the pricing of healthy foods affects health outcomes. (NPR, 3/2)

– Denmark is emerging as a  leader in the fight against food waste. (NPR, 3/1)

– The Instagrams of Food Deserts (Atlantic, 3/1)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Ever wonder how we’ve come to love certain animals as pets, and turn our noses up at the sight of others?

– Ciara

Third-grade reading proficiency remains stagnant in D.C., declining for some

DISTRICT/EDUCATION
A new analysis of third-grade reading proficiency from 2007-2014 by D.C. Action for Children finds that standardized test scores remained stagnant for District students citywide, and declined for economically disadvantaged students during that period. (WCP, 3/1)

The report highlights other academic gaps. Nine in 10 white third-graders attained proficient scores on the 2014 test, versus 35 and 36 percent of black and Hispanic third-graders, respectively, according to D.C Action for Children.

Based on its findings, the group recommends that D.C. invest even more in early care and education programs such as home visits as well as strengthen early literacy programs such as the D.C. Public Library’s “Books from Birth” program.

Related Event: Literacy is the topic at the next event in WRAG’s 2016 Public Education Speaker Series. Funders, click here to learn more about the event.

How One D.C. Elementary’s 5th Grade Enrollment Highlights Concerns About Middle School (WAMU 3/2)

PHILANTHROPY
–  Well-known native Washingtonian James V. Kimsey, philanthropist and cofounder of America Online, has passed away. (WaPo, 3/1)

– A new website, Successes of Philanthropy, aims to serve as a digital archive of philanthropic wins made by a variety of grant making institutions. The project is supported by a number of organizations, including the JP Morgan Chase Foundation, with strategic input from others, including the Council on Foundations. (Chronicle, 3/1)

HOUSING/POVERTY | Why losing a home means losing everything (WaPo, 2/29)

FOOD
– Find out how Denmark and other places are working to solidify their position as leaders in the fight against food waste. (NPR, 3/1)

The Instagrams of Food Deserts (Atlantic, 3/1)

ARTS | In recognition of Women’s History Month and the public’s general lack of awareness about women in the field, the National Museum of Women in the Arts has launched a campaign challenging everyone to name five women artists . (WCP, 3/1)


When will the cherry blossoms(!) hit peak bloom? Find out here.

– Ciara

Rising poverty rates in Virginia schools bring challenges

VIRGINIA/POVERTY/EDUCATION
Over the past several years, some Northern Virginia schools have seen a stark increase in the number of students who live in poverty. Particularly in Fairfax County, school administrators continue to try to meet the growing needs of students amid budget constraints. (WAMU, 3/1)

In the last decade, school administrators across Northern Virginia noticed a marked increased in the number of students who live in poverty. Nowhere was the trend more pitched than Manassas, where the percentage of students living in poverty increased from 24 to nearly 58 percent in the last 10 years.

RELATED: Yesterday, we shared some of the important points made by Dr. Matthew Biel, Director of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Georgetown University Medical Center, at the first session of WRAG’s 2016 Public Education Speaker Series where he spoke on the impact of toxic stress on children’s development stemming from a number of issues like housing instability and food insecurity. (Daily 2/29)

PHILANTHROPY
– The Hill-Snowdon Foundation has launched a new website for their Making Black Lives Matter Initiative (MBLM). The site will provide background on the MBLM Initiative, focused on “supporting black-led organizing in order to help revitalize and strengthen the institutional and political power of the black community.” The website also introduces the Black Social Change Funders Network  a network to help foundations and donors accelerate their interest in supporting black-led social change – in partnership with the Association of Black Foundation Executives.

Venture Philanthropy Partners, in association with Prince George’s County administration, public schools, local business leaders, philanthropy, and social profit organizations, recently launched the Ready for Work initiative, aimed at providing students with real work experiences prior to graduation from high school. (VPP, 2/2016)

– The Executives’ Alliance for Boys & Men of Color have announced a ‘Ban the Box Philanthropy Challenge,’ calling for U.S. philanthropic institutions to adopt fair chance hiring policies. Participating and supporting organizations include: Butler Family Fund, Consumer Health Foundation, Council on FoundationsOpen Society Foundations, and Public Welfare Foundation.

– Funders for LGBTQ Issues has released their 2014 Tracking Report, analyzing 4,552 grants from 313 foundations funding LGBTQ issues within that calendar year. You can view the comprehensive assessment and its accompanying infographic here. (Funders for LGBTQ Issues, 2/25)

IMMIGRATION/YOUTH/REGION | Remaking High School for Immigrant Kids (City Lab, 2/29)

CSR | In his latest blog post, Tim McClimon, president of the American Express Foundation and head faculty member for the Institute for CSR, examines the challenges facing many CSR professionals today in keeping millennial leaders engaged. (American Express, 2/29)

ARTS | The Theatre Communications Group is taking nominations for D.C. area early-career leaders of color in social-profit theater to participate in their Rising Leaders of Color program, designed to “change the face of the theatre field by nurturing and supporting an inter-generational network of leaders of color at various stages in their careers.”


Check out this trailer for what is probably the only right way to do a film about the life of Vincent Van Gogh. 

– Ciara

WRAG Board elects 2016 board officers

WRAG
WRAG is excited to announce that this week the WRAG Board elected the following members to serve as new and returning board officers beginning in 2016:

ChairLynn Tadlock, Claude Moore Charitable Foundation
Vice ChairYanique Redwood, Consumer Health Foundation
TreasurerAnna Bard, Wells Fargo
Secretary – Mary McClymont, Public Welfare Foundation

CHILDREN/REGION
– DC Action for Children has released a new analysis based on 20 indicators of well-being to determine the state of children in the District’s eight wards. In some wards, children and their families are being left behind in an ever-growing city (WCP, 12/8):

Wards 5, 7, and 8 contain some of the largest numbers of children yet have the lowest median family incomes, even as the median income in D.C. increased by roughly 18 percent between 2010 and 2013. At least one in five children in Wards 1, 5, 6, 7, and 8 live in poverty, the analysis reports; the total child poverty rate in D.C. dropped by less than one percent during the same period.

– Another study sheds light on the high costs of child care for parents in the U.S. – and especially D.C., Maryland, and Virginia. As child care costs rival that of sending a young adult to college, the report by Child Care Aware urges Congress to take action. (WTOP, 12/8)

HOUSING | Why it’s so hard to afford a rental even if you make a decent salary (WaPo, 12/9)

ECONOMY/REGION | A recent gathering of three elected leaders from D.C., Maryland, and Virginia show that top leaders are starting to think more regionally. (WaPo, 12/8)

PHILANTHROPY 
Opinion: Author, chief executive of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, and previous WRAG Annual Meeting speaker Emmett Carson, shares in this open letter why he believes the Council on Foundations and Independent Sector should merge to build a stronger, more integrated network for the social profit sector. (Chronicle, 12/4)

Opinion: 3 Key Ideas on the Power of the Zuckerberg-Chan Pledge (Chronicle, 12/8)

HEALTH/HOMELESSNESS | The Atlantic explores the dynamic of a family in shelter with four young children as the parents participate in a program that aims to strengthen the bonds among homeless families that are often strained due to overwhelming stress. (Atlantic, 12/8)


Here are a few of the books Bill Gates says you should be reading right now.

– Ciara