Tag: Claude Moore Charitable Foundation

Shining a light on need in Loudoun County

Editor’s note: WRAG’s staff are heading next week to Indianapolis, to attend the Forum of Regional Association of Grantmakers’ annual conference. The Daily will return on Tuesday, July 26. Stay cool!


COMMUNITY | Next year, the Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties will launch a community awareness campaign to raise the profile of poverty in Loudoun and encourage residents to support local nonprofit organizations that serve their neighbors in need. (Loudoun Now, 7/14)

Leading up to the campaign’s launch in March of 2017, nonprofit leaders will hold focus groups to identify how best to let the public know what local charities exist and what services they provide.

America Gives’ most recent report shows that, in 2012, Loudoun County residents donated, on average, 1.98 percent of their discretionary income to charities. That’s well below neighboring jurisdictions.

“This is a chance to change people’s knowledge and behavior toward nonprofits in Loudoun County,” said Caroline Toye, associate director of Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties. “We want to empower residents to be engaged, however they want to, whether through volunteering, serving on a board or donating.”

The campaign grew out of WRAG’s 2015 Loudoun County Philanthropy Conference, and additional funding has been provided by the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation, the Community Foundation for the National Capital Area, and the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia.

Related: WRAG’s Katy Moore and Amy Owen, executive director of the Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties, take a closer look at poverty in Loudoun County – a place typically portrayed as having great wealth –  and explain the need for this campaign. (Daily, 7/15)

LGBTQ | The Fairfax County School Board is considering regulations to safeguard the rights of transgender students that would ensure access to restrooms that align with their gender identity, and require teachers to use students’ preferred pronouns. (WaPo, 7/15)

HOUSING
– Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett says he is committed to increasing the supply of affordable housing for seniors in the county, a population that is growing rapidly. (Bethesda Beat, 7/13)

Nonprofit seeks to revitalize Anacostia one blighted house at a time (WaPo, 7/7)

RACISM | Scientists are trying many different experiments to try to counteract implicit bias. Most interventions, but not all, haven’t been shown to be very effective. (Atlantic, 7/14)

RFP | EventsDC is accepting grant proposals from nonprofits supporting children through sports, performing arts, or cultural arts in the District of Columbia. More information is available here.

PHILANTHROPY | Opinion: Think Giving to Groups That Support Nonprofits Is a Waste? You’re Wrong. (Chronicle, 7/6)


Jobs

Administrative Assistant | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Philanthropic Services Associate | The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
Grants Manager | The Norman & Ruth Rales Foundation
Senior Communication Consultant | Kaiser Permanente

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar


Note to self: When in the woods, always look inside your car before opening the door.

– Rebekah

Friday roundup – March 14 through March 18, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG/THE WRAG COMMUNITY
 – WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland posed the question, “When was the last time you talked about racism?,” and explained her view on why you should start. (Daily, 3/15)

– Catherine Oidtman, Philanthropy Fellow at the Healthcare Initiative Foundation, shared what she’s learned about going “beyond dollars” in philanthropy. (Daily, 3/14)

Related for WRAG Members: We are now accepting applications from WRAG members interested in hosting Philanthropy Fellows this fall. For more information about this program and how to apply, click here.

Opinion: Lynn Tadlock, Deputy Executive Director of Giving at the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation and WRAG board chair, shared her views on why urgent reform is necessary to put an end to gerrymandering in Virginia. (Loudoun Times, 3/3)

THIS WEEK IN TRANSIT/INFRASTRUCTURE
 Why Washington’s transportation is a problem, in one map (GGW, 3/15)

– Opinion: We caused the Metro shutdown when we decided to let our cities decay (WaPo, 3/16)

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH/EQUITY
– WAMU released their new, four-part series on the continuing struggle for inclusion facing individuals with developmental disabilities in the District. (WAMU,  3/2016)

– The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released their 2016 County Health RankingsIn Virginia, Loudoun County was number one in the overall ranking for health outcomes, and in Maryland, Montgomery County came out on top. (WTOP, 3/16)


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Who do you think is the most photographed man of the 19th century?

– Ciara

A look at employment in the social profit sector through the Great Recession

WORKFORCE
New data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveal that during the Great Recession, as other industries cut back significantly on hiring and increased layoffs, the social profit sector continued to add jobs – a trend that is likely to reverse, for better or for worse. (WaPo, 3/2)

At the same time, organizations dipped into rainy day funds to stay afloat, resulting in a decline in asset levels. Some workers may have accepted lower wages for non-profit work because of the poor job market, boosting employment as well.

All of that is also why, when the bureau next puts out employment numbers, the figures might show a decrease: Resources are depleted, and the need also isn’t as great.

– A new JPMorgan Chase report, “Tech Jobs for All? Exploring the Promise and Pitfalls of Technology Training in the United States,” takes a look at the rapidly growing and quickly evolving tech training field and the unique obstacles it faces in developing the skilled and diverse workforce required to meet a growing need within the economy. The report is part of  JPMorgan Chase’s $250 million, five-year New Skills at Work initiative to address the mismatch between employer needs and the skills of job seekers..

Opinion: Jobs for the Young in Poor Neighborhoods (NYT, 3/14)

WRAG/RACISM | In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland poses the question, “When was the last time you talked about racism?,” and explains her view on why you should start. (Daily, 3/15)

COMMUNITY/VIRGINIA | Opinion: Lynn Tadlock, Deputy Executive Director of Giving of the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation and WRAG board chair, shares her views on why urgent reform is necessary to put an end to gerrymandering in the state of Virginia. (Loudoun Times, 3/3)

HIV/AIDS | Eight American cities joined the Fast Track Cities Initiative, established on World AIDS Day in 2014 “to ensure that 90% of people living with HIV know that they have the virus, are taking anti-retroviral treatment medications and in so doing, are keeping the virus suppressed.” Take a look at what those cities, including the District, have been doing to successfully lower their HIV/AIDS rates and increase awareness. Kudos to the Washington AIDS Partnership for being recognized for their work! (Mic, 3/10)

POVERTY | Federal assistance for families in poverty can cover expenses like food, health care, and housing, but with data showing that families in the lowest-income quintile spend around 14 percent of their after-tax income on diapers, advocates are seeking ways to further support those in need with household necessities. (WaPo, 3/14)

HEALTH/EQUITY | WAMU unveils a new, four-part series on the continuing struggle for inclusion that those with developmental disabilities in the District face. (WAMU,  3/ 2016)

ARTS/PHILANTHROPY | Americans Support Increases for Government Arts Funding (ArtsBlog, 3/5)


Perhaps the only thing more significant than turning 100-years-old is being able to do it with three of your lifelong friends.

– Ciara

WRAG Board elects 2016 board officers

WRAG
WRAG is excited to announce that this week the WRAG Board elected the following members to serve as new and returning board officers beginning in 2016:

ChairLynn Tadlock, Claude Moore Charitable Foundation
Vice ChairYanique Redwood, Consumer Health Foundation
TreasurerAnna Bard, Wells Fargo
Secretary – Mary McClymont, Public Welfare Foundation

CHILDREN/REGION
– DC Action for Children has released a new analysis based on 20 indicators of well-being to determine the state of children in the District’s eight wards. In some wards, children and their families are being left behind in an ever-growing city (WCP, 12/8):

Wards 5, 7, and 8 contain some of the largest numbers of children yet have the lowest median family incomes, even as the median income in D.C. increased by roughly 18 percent between 2010 and 2013. At least one in five children in Wards 1, 5, 6, 7, and 8 live in poverty, the analysis reports; the total child poverty rate in D.C. dropped by less than one percent during the same period.

– Another study sheds light on the high costs of child care for parents in the U.S. – and especially D.C., Maryland, and Virginia. As child care costs rival that of sending a young adult to college, the report by Child Care Aware urges Congress to take action. (WTOP, 12/8)

HOUSING | Why it’s so hard to afford a rental even if you make a decent salary (WaPo, 12/9)

ECONOMY/REGION | A recent gathering of three elected leaders from D.C., Maryland, and Virginia show that top leaders are starting to think more regionally. (WaPo, 12/8)

PHILANTHROPY 
Opinion: Author, chief executive of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, and previous WRAG Annual Meeting speaker Emmett Carson, shares in this open letter why he believes the Council on Foundations and Independent Sector should merge to build a stronger, more integrated network for the social profit sector. (Chronicle, 12/4)

Opinion: 3 Key Ideas on the Power of the Zuckerberg-Chan Pledge (Chronicle, 12/8)

HEALTH/HOMELESSNESS | The Atlantic explores the dynamic of a family in shelter with four young children as the parents participate in a program that aims to strengthen the bonds among homeless families that are often strained due to overwhelming stress. (Atlantic, 12/8)


Here are a few of the books Bill Gates says you should be reading right now.

– Ciara

 

New data on average household income by Metro station

REGION
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority has released new data on the average household income of Metrorail riders by line and station. The visualization also shows how income levels rise and dip at various times throughout the day (GGW, 7/7):

You can see the Washington region’s wide range of income levels in the data visualization, which uses data from Metro’s 2012 rider survey. This visualization is different from similar ones in that it uses self-reported data from Metrorail riders.

A high quality transit system is a key to ensuring opportunities for people of every socioeconomic status.

– Loudoun Schools fight hunger through summer meal program (Loudoun Times, 7/7)

Related: Interested in learning more about the needs of Loudoun County? Join WRAG on Tuesday, July 14 at 1:00 PM for Loudoun Philanthropy: Next steps for developing a strong social sector. This meeting is open to the community and is supported by the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation, the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia, the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, and the Middleburg Community Center. Click here to find out how to register.

– Can you afford to retire in Loudoun County? (Loudoun Times, 7/8)

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | In Arlington County, a new citizen’s group is concerned about the discrepancies in where the county’s additional affordable housing units will be clustered. The group worries that there are disproportionate numbers of affordable housing being built in certain areas, which will lead to a great deal of socioeconomic segregation. (ARLnow, 7/7)

PHILANTHROPY | The Center for Effective Philanthropy has released a new publication, Investing and Social Impact: Practices of Private Foundations, which takes a look at the state of practice of impact investing and negative screening at large, private U.S.-based foundations. (CEP, 5/2015)

EDUCATION
– EdBuild has released a new interactive map that displays the poverty rates in each of the school districts in the United States. You can access the map here. (WaPo, 7/8)

– The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) released a new report on the differences in the quality of preparation students in high-poverty schools receive compared with students in low-poverty schools. The study, Course, Counselor, and Teacher Gaps: Addressing the College Readiness Challenge in High-Poverty High Schoolsanalyzes 100 of the largest school districts in the U.S. (PND, 7/5)

COMMUNITY | The Foundation Center offers a multi-functional training facility for rent for groups looking to host meetings, conferences, seminars, or computer-based training programs. For more information, click here.


Are your reusable grocery bags making you buy more cookies?

– Ciara

Resources run low for seniors in need

FOOD/SENIORS
In D.C., individuals over the age of 60 make up a growing number of the population. As a large portion of those seniors experience hunger, resources are not currently available to meet demands (WAMU, 7/3):

About 16 percent of the District’s population is over 60. That’s about 107,000 people. Roughly half of them access some type of social service through the District’s Office on Aging [DCOA]. But a much-needed program to feed some of our most vulnerable neighbors may have run out of money.

[…]

DCOA says that new enrollments for the delivery program are on temporary hold, but an additional $200,000 has been secured for next fiscal year. The agency says eligible seniors can access other food sources such as free vouchers for grocery stores and farmer’s markets as well free lunches at 52 centers.

The Catch-22 is that many of the seniors who are eligible for home meal delivery can’t access those other options, which is precisely why they qualify for home meal delivery.

COMMUNITY | The Community Foundation for Northern Virginia welcomes their new board chair, Paul Leslie, CEO of Dovel Technologies. Leslie replaces WRAG Vice Chair and Deputy Executive Director of Giving at the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation, K. Lynn Tadlock.

HEALTH | Opinion: Paying People to Be Healthy Usually Works, if the Public Can Stomach It (NYT, 7/6)

EDUCATION/YOUTH | Experts point to extraordinarily high rates of transient students as one factor that makes schooling more difficult for youth enrolled in DCPS. (WaPo, 7/4)

PHILANTHROPY | As Greece struggles with a financial crisis, there are some lessons philanthropy can learn from the ongoing situation. (Spear’s, 7/1)


How do you usually spend your time?

– Ciara

Food banks in the region prepare for summer

FOOD/POVERTY
Though Loudoun County is among one of the wealthiest counties in the nation, food banks there are preparing themselves for the summer surge in demand from many families who rely on their services (WaPo, 5/13):

More than 12,500 children in Loudoun public schools depend on free or reduced-price lunches through their schools, county education officials said. When the school year ends, the missing breakfasts and lunches place considerable pressure on economically vulnerable families, said Jennifer Montgomery, executive director of Loudoun Interfaith Relief.

“In the summer, you have this confluence of events — you have kids getting out of school, and now these parents are scrambling to pay for child care, and they’re also having to find food,” she said.

[…]

Although the percentage of people living below the poverty line in Loudoun is fairly low — about 4 to 5 percent, Montgomery said — about 30 percent of the county’s residents are underemployed and scraping by on less than a living wage.

Related: Tomorrow, WRAG will hold our first-ever Loudoun County Philanthropy Conference, focusing on the unique needs of the area with panelists representing the government, nonprofit, and philanthropic sectors. The event will be held at the Middleburg Community Center and is supported by the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation, The Community Foundation for Northern Virginia, and The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region.

TRANSIT/VIRGINIA
A new report by the George Mason University Center for Regional Analysis finds that the need for further transit investment in Northern Virginia is critical in order to elevate the economy and spur business development. Business leaders and elected officials echoed similar sentiments at a recent gathering (Fairfax Times, 5/8):

“In order for this region to remain competitive, we have to have a 21st century transportation network,” said Robert Puentes, a senior fellow with the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program.

Many businesses are already voting with their feet and choosing to relocate to more transit-accessible areas, according to speakers at Friday’s forum.

A Virginia Tech analysis of 2011 U.S. census data found that 59 percent of the jobs in Northern Virginia are located within a quarter mile of a Metro or VRE station or a bus stop. More than 90 percent of new office space in the region is within a half mile of a Metrorail station, according to Shyam Kannan, director of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority’s Office of Planning.

HOUSING | In a recent ranking of states with the least affordable home prices using 2013 U.S. Census data, the District came in at number two behind Hawaii. (Time, 5/11)


Though it may not be as hot as it was yesterday, outdoor movie season is officially here!

– Ciara

Friday roundup – April 20 through April 24, 2015

THIS WEEK IN AGING/POVERTY
Many older Americans across the U.S. are experiencing food insecurity, a lingering effect of the Great Recession that has not yet shown signs of recovery for the growing senior population. According to a new report ranking each state’s percentage of seniors facing the threat of hunger, the Greater Washington region’s senior population is among those facing hard times. (WaPo, 4/23)

A new national report on food insecurity among older Americans ranks the District fourth, just behind Mississippi.

The report says that more than 20 percent of the District’s elderly have concerns about eating enough food or the right kind of food, compared with more than 24 percent of seniors in Mississippi.

The estimates of senior hunger range from about 8 percent in Minnesota to more than 26 percent in Arkansas, which was ranked highest among states where seniors face the threat of hunger. Virginia and Maryland both had rates of about 14 percent.

The Atlantic explored the economic inequalities that exist for many Americans well beyond retirement age, despite the shared experiences of growing older that most seniors endure. (Atlantic, 4/20)

THIS WEEK IN COMMUNITY/EVENTS
– Lynn Tadlock, Vice Chair of WRAG’s board and Deputy Executive Director of Giving at the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation, discussed the upcoming Loudoun County Philanthropy Conference on May 14 and how it aims to strengthen the “three-legged stool” of government, business, and the social sector to meet the often unnoticed needs of Loudoun County. (Daily, 4/22)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION/BUDGETS
– Prince George’s County braced itself for what could potentially be a $20 million loss in state school funding. (Gazette, 4/22)

D.C. schools budget includes wide range in per-student spending (WaPo, 4/23)

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION/ECONOMY
National Parks Brought $1.4 Billion to the D.C. Region in 2014 (DCist, 4/24)


WRAG EVENTS NEXT WEEK

Northern Virginia LEG: The Art of Successful Site Visits (co-sponsored with Exponent Philanthropy and the Southeastern Council of Foundations)
Wednesday, April 29  10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Brightest Minds: Dr. Isabel Sawhill on Creating a New Ethic of Responsible Parenthood (WRAG members and non-members)
Thursday, April 30  9:30 AM – 11:30 AM (At PNC Bank)


Today is the Library of Congress’ 215th birthday! Find out what’s actually in there.

– Ciara

D.C. bill aimed at providing one year of birth control at a time

WOMEN/HEALTH
The D.C. Council is pushing forward on legislation that would give women the ability to obtain a 12-month supply of birth control at one time, in hopes of preventing gaps in use and further lowering the rate of unintended pregnancies. (Times, 4/21)

In a report on the bill, the D.C. Council’s Health and Human Services Committee noted that in 2008 the District had the highest rate of unintended pregnancies in the nation and that providing women with a 12-month supply of birth control at one time could help reduce gaps in contraceptive use that often lead to unintended pregnancies.

[…]

While the cost of some contraceptives is covered by insurance, the committee report notes that poor women may still face barriers in obtaining prescriptions if they have to travel to a pharmacy every month to get a refill.

“These constraints make accessing contraceptives costly for women, especially those who are low-income and have financial constraints that make transportation, taking time off, and child care, difficult,” the committee report states. “Enabling women to receive 12-months of contraceptives at one time will reduce the costs of these logistical barriers to accessing contraceptives, thus decreasing gaps in use and decreasing the risk for unintended pregnancies.”

Related: There is still space available for next week’s Brightest Minds event with Dr. Isabel Sawhill, author of Generation Unbound: Drifting into Sex and Parenthood without Marriage. This event is open to WRAG members and non-members.

COMMUNITY/EVENTS | WRAG Vice Chair and Deputy Executive Director of Giving at the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation, Lynn Tadlock, explains why the upcoming Loudoun County Philanthropy Conference on May 14 is aiming to strengthen the “three-legged stool” of government, business, and the social sector to meet the often unnoticed needs of Loudoun County. (Daily, 4/22)

ECONOMY
– Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett announced plans to replace the county’s current economic development agency with a public-private authority that would give economic development responsibilities to business leaders if approved by the County Council, similar to that of Fairfax County’s Economic Development Authority. (WBJ, 4/21)

The goal of the authority, Leggett said, will be putting economic development responsibilities — branding and marketing the county and dealing with myths and negative perceptions the business community has of it – in the hands of the “people in the field.” That is, business leaders.

 Why American Workers Without Much Education Are Being Hammered (NYT, 4/21)

EDUCATIONPrince George’s looking at $20 million loss in state school funding (Gazette, 4/22)

TRANSIT/EQUITY | Bike-share programs have many positive benefits to communities and their residents, but many of the systems reveal a social equity problem in which low-income individuals find they either can’t access or can’t afford the service. (CityLab, 4/21)

VIRGINIA/BUDGETS | Arlington passes budget for fiscal 2016 without raising the property-tax rate (WaPo, 4/21)


In honor of Earth Day, find out which animal you are.

– Ciara

Loudoun County:  Uncovering the Needs, Coordinating a Response

tadlock

by Lynn Tadlock
Deputy Executive Director of Giving, Claude Moore Charitable Foundation
Vice Chair, WRAG Board of Directors

I have worked in the Greater Washington region since college – mostly in public service – and have been amazed at the development, economic changes, and demographic shifts in our region. I’ve also seen the vast opportunities and difficult challenges that this growth and change have presented for many of our region’s jurisdictions and residents.

After a long career in Fairfax County government and now as the deputy director of one of the largest foundations in our region – the Claude Moore Charitable Foundation – I have come to understand that no one sector can fully address these challenges and opportunities alone, especially in this region where our issues are so connected and our populations are so transient. If we are to improve the quality of life in each of our jurisdictions and the region as a whole, we need a collaborative, multi-sector approach – what I call the “three-legged stool” – where government, business, and the social sector work in collaboration for the benefit of all.

We need that collaboration now more than ever. While some parts of our region are experiencing boom times, all jurisdictions are feeling the impact of federal budget cuts. Many nonprofits and faith-based organizations are experiencing increased demand for human services and burn-out of long-time leaders. While, at the same time, much of the business community is reducing or redefining its charitable giving.

This is all especially true in Loudoun County – our region’s fastest growing jurisdiction. And, the impact of these factors is amplified by the fact that their impact on residents often goes unnoticed in other parts of the region.

On May 14, cross-sector leaders from around the region will have the opportunity to learn about the unique needs and opportunities of Loudoun at the Loudoun County Philanthropy Conference. I invite you to join me and other philanthropic, nonprofit, government, and business leaders for this unique opportunity to learn about the needs in Loudoun, explore strategies for addressing those needs, and network with colleagues who are dedicated to improving quality of life in our region.

I am delighted that our region’s philanthropic sector is leading a conversation on how we can work together to ensure that the legs of Loudoun County’s three-legged stool are solid. Let’s make the Loudoun County Philanthropy Conference our starting point. I hope to see you there.