Tag: census

#CountDMVIn kicks off to mobilize a complete 2020 Census count in the Greater Washington region

\

CENSUS 2020
– Last week, WRAG and 14 partner organizations convened Interventions that Work: 2020 Census & Hard-to-Count Communities, a forum that kicked off a regional get-out-the-count effort, especially among immigrant communities, communities of color, and other populations that are at risk of being undercounted in the census. Check out the #CountDMVIn hashtag on Twitter for conversation highlights, and watch the kickoff video below, produced by the United Way of the National Capital Area, and featuring Dr. Madye Henson (WRAG), Rosie Allen-Herring (UWNCA), Chuck Bean (Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments), and other community leaders.

Related: The Resilience Fund, a funding collaborative at the Greater Washington Community Foundation, has released a new RFP for the 2020 Count DMV In Census Project, a pooled fund to support projects focused on the 2020 Census, including education, outreach, and direct assistance focused on hard-to-count communities. Learn more here.

Related: Read a message from the co-chairs of WRAG’s 2020 Census Working Group calling on their philanthropic colleagues to invest in nonprofit partners with deep connections to those communities – especially communities of color – most at risk of an undercount. (WRAG members: The next working group meeting is Monday, June 17. Register here.)

– The Urban Institute has released a new interactive data resource looking at the potential for census miscounts under different risk scenarios. (Urban, 6/4)

HOUSING
– Wells Fargo has pledged to invest $1 billion from its business and foundation into affordable housing. (Chronicle, 6/5)

For better or worse, opportunity zones abound in Greater Washington. Here’s where the money is likely to flow. (WBJ, 6/7)

DISTRICT
D.C. Budget Thrown Into Turmoil After City’s CFO Objects To Funding Ploy To Pay For Public Housing Repairs (WAMU, 6/10)

Against The Backdrop Of Barry Farm’s Demolition, The Goodman League Returns (WAMU, 6/10)

EDUCATION | Virginia Tech Will Be Amazon’s Neighbor With Construction Of New $1B ‘Innovation Campus’ (WAMU 6/10)

PUBLIC SAFETY | Residents in Ward 8 say it’s time to broaden the definition of safe streets to include both car and gun violence. (GGWash, 6/7)

GENTRIFICATION | London and San Francisco have legislation that protects live music venues from consequential noise complaints. Could DC be next? (CP, 6/5)


Missed the Tony’s on Sunday?  Here are the highlights

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back this week on Wednesday and Thursday!

– Buffy

Voting rights could be restored for incarcerated prisoners in the District

VOTING RIGHTS | Lawmakers in the District are seeking to make the nation’s capital the first jurisdiction to restore voting rights to incarcerated prisoners, with plans to introduce legislation Tuesday to repeal language in a 1955 law that disenfranchises DC residents upon felony convictions. (WaPo, 6/3)

The District has some of lowest restrictions on felons voting, where their voting rights are automatically restored when they are released from prison, and election officials visit the DC jail to help non-felons cast absentee ballots … “Unfortunately in the District and across the country, incarcerated people make up a sizable population of residents,” said Council member Robert C. White Jr., who is introducing the legislation … “They don’t lose their citizenship when they are incarcerated, so they shouldn’t lose their right to vote.” White’s bill thrusts the District to the vanguard of the felon enfranchisement movement, and believes that the discussion around criminal voting restrictions should focus on the racist motivations of the laws and how they disproportionately disenfranchise African Americans.

CENSUS 2020Deceased GOP Strategist’s Hard Drives Reveal New Details on the Census Citizenship Question (NYT, 5/30)

Related: Vanita Gupta, president & CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, issued this statement in response to the New York Times’ revelation. Gupta is the keynote speaker at Thursday’s Interventions that Work: Census 2020 & Hard-to-Count Communities forum, co-convened by WRAG and 14 partner organizations to elevate strategies for a complete and accurate 2020 Census.

COMMUNITY | Last year WRAG launched the Journalism Fellows Project to share our platform with youth of color in this region who are often written about, but are rarely asked their perspectives on the issues facing their communities and families. In today’s edition, we hear from Thomas Kent, 2019 graduate of Richard Wright Public Charter School in DC, about the impact of violence in his neighborhood. (Daily, 6/4)

AFFORDABLE HOUSING | A new audit reveals that DC Mayor Bowser has awarded at least five housing projects to developers with low-ranked proposals. The move cost the city 353 affordable housing units, and raises questions about the process. (WaPo, 5/30)

WORKFORCE/EQUITY | Emergency legislation at the DC Council would prevent employment discrimination against city workers in the medical marijuana program. (dcist, 5/31)

NONPROFITS | New Pilot Program is Bringing Books to a Barbershop on Lee Highway (ARLnow, 5/28)

ENVIRONMENT | According to a just-published list put out each year by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Tidal Basin is among the 11 most endangered historic places in 2019. (WAMU, 5/30)

CHILDREN & FAMILIES | What Makes A City Child-Friendly? (WAMU, 5/31)

PHILANTHROPY | The Kids Are Alright: Millennials Reluctant to Give, But Donate Generously When They Do (Inside Philanthropy, 5/30)


It’s 3 am – do you know what your iPhone is doing? Yikes!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday!

– Buffy

Child care costs are on the rise, while many providers are struggling to make ends meet

CHILD CARE | As child care costs continue to rise, many providers are still among the lowest-paid workers in the country, while area parents are paying among the highest costs for child care in the nation. (WAMU, 5/29)

In DC, the median hourly wage for childcare workers was $14.33 in 2017. In Maryland, it was $11.29. And in Virginia, it was $9.82 … This may come as a surprise to area parents, who are paying among the highest costs for child care in the nation — sometimes thousands of dollars a month. [According to] Lea Austin, co-director of the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at the University of California, Berkeley, those costs may not be high enough to provide what’s needed. Austin says that after paying for the essentials of running a child care center — things like rent, utilities and supplies — there’s little money left for the actual people who are doing the work, many of whom are women, often women of color.

CENSUS | In today’s Daily WRAG, the co-chairs of WRAG’s Census 2020 Working Group, Levina Kim (United Way of the National Capital Area), Ria Pugeda (Consumer Health Foundation), and Terri Wright (Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation), explain the urgency around the 2020 Census and call on their philanthropic colleagues to invest to support outreach, education, and assistance for those communities most at risk of being undercounted in the census. (Daily, 5/30)

HOUSING | How much money do workers have after paying housing costs? For blue-collar and service workers in major cities – like Washington, DC – the affordable housing crisis hits harder. (CityLab, 5/21)

EDUCATION
– Arlington Public Schools has reached a settlement with the US Department of Justice to improve services for English-learning students over the next three years, after the Justice Department found multiple compliance issues with the English Learner programs and practices.  (WAMU, 5/21)

– Governor Hogan has vetoed a bill that would have allowed more undocumented immigrants to pay in-state college tuition. (Bethesda Magazine, 5/24)

IMMIGRATION | As part of the county’s newly approved $5.8 billion operating budget, the Montgomery County Council has allocated $14.5 million for 335 individual grants to community nonprofits, the largest share of which is going toward immigration assistance programs. (Bethesda Magazine, 5/29)

CULTURE | DC’s independent, black-owned bookstores are thriving. But will high taxes do them in? (GGWash, 5/29)

ENVIRONMENT | The Tidal Basin Is One Of America’s ‘Most Endangered Places’ (WAMU, 5/30)

TRANSITDo more roads mean less traffic? That’s the question Maryland and Virginia are being asked as the Capital Beltway widening proposal is discussed. (WAMU, 5/29)

ECONOMY | National parks tourism brought over $1.5B in benefits to DC area (WTOP, 5/28)

PHILANTHROPY | The Butterfly Effect: Tracking the Growth of Women’s Funds (Philanthropy Women, 5/14)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Senior Program Manager | Rising Tide Foundation – New!
Development Manager | Mikva Challenge DC – New!
Foundation Director | Venable LLP – New!
Development Associate | Sitar Arts Center
Grants Manager | Arabella Advisors
Institutional Development Officer | Martha’s Table
Development Manager, Washington, DC | Reading Partners
Director of Individual Giving | Horizons Greater Washington
Grants Compliance Manager | Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter
Director of Corporate and Foundation Advancement | Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers
Engagement Officer | Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Grants and Communications Associate | Neighborhood Health
Senior Manager of Member Engagement and Partnerships | United Philanthropy Forum
Director of Development​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation
Director of Operations​ | ​Washington Tennis & Education Foundation

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


Sparkling wine from a DC food truck? Yes, please.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back next week on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday!

– Buffy

Census Day is now just one year away

CENSUS
Census Day 2020 is one year from today. In an op-ed, Heather Peeler, President & CEO of ACT for Alexandria, explains why it is critical for the community to ensure everyone is counted in the 2020 Census. (Alexandria Times, 3/28)

Failure to count all Alexandrians is a threat to representational democracy and the values that are core to our country. An undercount means fewer dollars for schools, housing vouchers and many critical federal programs that our community members depend upon. The dollars add up quickly. On average each person counted represents about $2,000 in federal dollars per year for ten years. An undercount of even 1 to 2 percent means tens of millions of dollars in lost federal funding for our community.

– Over the next year, philanthropy, nonprofits, local government, business, and other community stakeholders are mobilizing around the 2020 Census. In a new blog post, Rebekah Seder, WRAG’s senior program manager, looks at why a fair and accurate census count is essential to an equitable future for our region. (Daily, 4/1)

Census 2020: For all to count, all must be counted (Black Press USA, 3/30)

For The First Time, US Census To Collect Responses In Arabic Among 13 Languages (NPR, 3/31)

House panel threatening subpoenas over census question (WaPo, 3/29)

HOUSING
– To address concerns about housing affordability in the DC suburbs, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam will ask state lawmakers this week to add $4 million to a housing trust fund. (WaPo, 4/1)

 – Now more than ever, DC must comply with fair housing rules (GGW, 3/28)

ARTS | Arts and culture are an economic power, contributing more than $800 billion a year to US economic output. (CityLab, 3/28)

RACIAL EQUITY
Dismantling racism and oppression
within school systems can be prioritized with mandatory worker training. (Truthout, 3/28)

– Opinion: Economic inclusion and criminal justice reform are intertwined — and why the business community should care. (CityLab, 3/28)

NONPROFITS | 4 Ways Nonprofits Can Tackle a Growing US Divide (Chronicle, 3/26)

PHILANTHROPY | Opinion: Why Philanthropy Must Do More to Help Transgender People (Chronicle, 3/28)


Tips to get great cherry blossom pics with your phone!

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Thursday and Friday!

– Buffy

The District failed to spend allotted federal funds on lead paint hazards

HOUSING/HEALTH | Until four months ago, the District had a program called Lead Safe Washington operated out of DC’s Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), that would help low-income tenants remediate lead-based paint hazards in older rental properties. The program has been restructured after repeatedly failing to utilize allotted federal funding from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. (CP, 2/21)

Anne Cunningham, senior attorney at the Children’s Law Center says  “the loss of this grant [funding] is emblematic of the broader problem about how we approach lead in DC.” …She estimates that between previously awarded funds that went unspent and losing out on future grant money, DC has lost or forfeited about $7.6 million that it could have used to remediate lead hazards in older housing units.  “We just clearly did not use this resource that could have been so useful.”

CENSUS | Democrats and Republicans agree that adding a citizen question will render the 2020 Census inaccurate. (CityLab, 2/22)

RACIAL EQUITY
-Emmett Till’s Murder, and How America Remembers Its Darkest Moments (NY Times, 2/20) As WRAG has focused on racial equity over the past several years, we have tried to highlight the importance of understanding and acknowledging the history of racism in America. Participants on WRAG and LGW’s 2019 Civil Rights Learning Journey will visit several of the sites featured in this New York Times piece. To learn more about this trip, click here.

– Students from Hightstown High School in New Jersey drafted a bill calling for the release of civil rights cold-case files. (WaPo, 2/23)

WORKFORCE | Amazon hopes to hire most of HQ2 locally (WBJ, 2/22)

ENVIRONMENT | A technique called “greening” is being used in DC to keep raw sewage out of Rock Creek. (WAMU, 2/22)

TRANSIT
– The Greater Washington region needs better transportation among the suburbs, and here’s why. (GGW, 2/21)

– Metro’s deja vu debate over late hours keeps happening because people keep forgetting (WaPo, 2/24)

EDUCATION | Overworked Teachers And Budget Transparency Addressed In New DCPS Budget Proposal (WAMU, 2/21)

NONPROFITS/PHILANTHROPY | GrantAdvisor, a Yelp-like site that rates the nation’s charitable foundations, encourages dialogue between nonprofits and foundations. (NPQ, 2/22)


Did you stay up until midnight to watch the Oscars? If you missed it, here’s the full list of winners

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back tomorrow and Friday this week!

– Buffy

DC’s top education leaders trained to merge business concepts with equity in public education

EDUCATION/EQUITY | DC’s top three educational leaders – state superintendent Hanseul Kang, deputy mayor of education Paul Kihn, and acting schools chancellor Lewis Ferebee – have all studied at the Broad Center for the Management of School Systems, an educational leadership program that promotes a business perspective in the management of urban public school districts that has a focus on equity. Those who support the training program say it offers a unique corporate-like training experience, while critics say the teachings encourage school leaders to undermine democratic control of public education. (WAMU, 2/19)

Ferebee says it’s possible to merge these business concepts with equity in public education. “When you are studying leadership and change theory, there is a lot that you can learn from the business sector, and we obviously take advantage of that. [But] it’s not limited to business principles. Maximizing resources is obviously a part of the business community. Often times it is how you impact your bottom line. Maximizing your resources is also one way to address equity, ensuring that you get the most out of the public dollars you have access to.”

CENSUS | Communities of color and immigrants are at particular risk of being undercounted in the 2020 Census and the Virginia Legislature has recently stripped funds for Census outreach. (Commonwealth Institute, 2/14)

RACE | According to a just-released Goucher College poll, a majority of Maryland residents think race relations in the state have worsened in recent years. (WaPo, 2/18)

HEALTH | In honor of Presidents Day, the de Beaumont Foundation has released a quiz with interesting facts about US presidents and how their policy, advocacy, and private lives have influenced Americans’ health.

HOMELESSNESS | A challenge to Virginia’s ‘habitual drunkard’ law argues that it targets homeless people. (WaPo, 2/18)

WORKFORCE | A proposed bill currently being considered in Annapolis would phase out lower wages paid to tipped workers. (WAMU, 2/8)

ENVIRONMENT | If we don’t address climate change, DC weather will feel more like Mississippi in the next 60 years. (WAMU, 2/15)

NONPROFITS | Sometimes the best thing we donors can do to advance social justice is to just write the check and get out of the way (Nonprofit AF, 2/18)


Marylanders love our Old Bay – do you know what’s in it?

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

The government shutdown cost the local economy $1.6 billion

SHUTDOWN 
– The government shutdown cost the DC region more than $1.6 billion in lost economic output, according to George Mason University economist Stephen Fuller – and it may have damaged the region’s image as well. (WaPo, 1/26)

Civic leaders, business owners and other analysts believe the closing of federal agencies has harmed the government’s reputation as a reliable business partner and employer, and it has affected the morale of local federal workers and contractors who went unpaid. Additionally, there is concern that companies and employees will look for work in the private sector, and hurt investment in the region. “It should have been the best year of the decade,” Fuller said. “It’s going to struggle to fulfill its potential.”

– In her latest column, WRAG’s president Tamara Lucas Copeland recognizes the strain on nonprofit organizations that ramped up to meet the needs of furloughed workers and others affected by the shutdown – and that now have to continue providing critical safety net services, with diminished financial resources. For many of those organizations, the emergency isn’t over, even if the media moves on. (Daily, 1/28)

HOUSING
– A housing complex in DC was developed specifically for grandparents raising children, or “grandfamilies,” whose numbers have been growing in recent years. As of 2017, 2.8 million children were being raised by 2.6 million grandparents, including 7,250 kids in DC. (WaPo, 1/22)

Enterprise Community Partners will invest $250 million over five years to spur collaboration among health, housing, and community development sectors through the newly launched “Health Begins with Home” – a national initiative to harness the power of affordable homes to create healthier families and stronger communities. (Enterprise, 1/24)

EDUCATION
– Virginia educators are taking to the streets and marching to the state capitol today to protest a lack of money for public schools. (WaPo, 1/27)

– Johns Hopkins University plans to buy the Newseum building in DC, and will maintain the building’s uses for “education, discovery, [and] free and open debate.” (Curbed, 1/25)

CENSUS | Even if the citizenship question is not on the 2020 census, people still may be afraid to report their information. (CityLab, 1/22)

HEALTH | In an attempt to diversify the next generation of doctors and focus on the shortage of primary care physicians in underserved areas, free tuition is being offered to medical students at New York University. (NPQ, 1/25)

MONTGOMERY COUNTY | Here are seven ways Montgomery County is changing (GGW, 1/24)

PHILANTHROPY | How Philanthropy Can Get Serious About Racial Healing (Chronicle, 1/22)


“Food Halls” are having a moment, and there’s a new Latin American food hall and market – La Cosecha – coming to DC this summer.

The (Almost) Daily WRAG will be back on Wednesday and Friday this week!

– Buffy

Federal workers who live in some parts of Greater Washington affected by the shutdown more than others

SHUTDOWN
– Federal workers who live in Southeast DC, Prince George’s County, or the outer suburbs, may be among those most affected by the ongoing government shutdown. According to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, half of federal workers in those areas earn less than $75,000 a year. (WAMU, 1/14)

About 360,000 federal workers live in the broader Washington region, and roughly 40 percent of those — or 145,000 workers — have been furloughed since December, according to Stephen Fuller, an economist at George Mason University. “The people that tend to get hurt are at the lower end of the wage spectrum or small businesses — people that just don’t have a whole lot of backup or alternatives” said Fuller.

– In response to the partial government shutdown, the Greater Washington Community Foundation announced they are dedicating $50,000 for emergency cash and food relief for local workers, contractors, and small business owners. The funds are being made available through the Resilience Fund. GWCF also has an extensive list of resources for furloughed federal employees and contractors on their website, including resources and support from the United Way of the National Capital Area, Pepco, Washington Gas, Bank of America, and Wells Fargo.

Related: During the shutdown of 2013, WRAG’s president Tamara Copeland wrote a column about why philanthropy, though critically important in helping to meet emergency needs, cannot replace government. That certainly continues to hold true today. (Daily, 10/2013)

CENSUS | The government is fighting a lawsuit filed by the NAACP that argues that, due to funding cuts, the 2020 Census is likely to massively undercount African Americans and other people of color, which will result in a loss of federal funding and Congressional representation (AP, 1/15)

HEALTH/RACIAL EQUITY | On January 28 lawmakers in the District will hold a public hearing to look at city response failures to surging heroin deaths in African American neighborhoods, and to determine strategies for combating the opioid epidemic. (WaPo, 1/11)

POVERTY/HOUSINGOpinion: Opportunity Zones: Can a tax break for rich people really help poor people? (WaPo, 1/14)

NONPROFITS | BoardSource is accepting applications for the 2019 Stand for Your Mission Award, recognizing nonprofit boards that have established advocacy as an expectation for engaged and effective board leadership. Proposals due: 2/1/19


Did you enjoy the snow this weekend? Lots of people seemed to, including those who took part in a massive snowball fight organized by the Washington, D.C. Snowball Fight Association near the Washington Monument – who knew??

– Buffy

New report shows how the police target Black Metro riders

TRANSIT/RACISM | A new report by the Washington Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs found that Metro Police have targeted metro stops heavily used by youth of color in hopes of arresting them for fare evasion. The data shows that the police have used the fare evasion charge to unfairly target Black people, especially Black men. (WLCCRU, 9/13)

Despite WMATA’s stated policy of cracking down on all fare evasion, WMATA’s own data suggests that the statute is not being enforced fairly. Rather, it shows that Metro Police are enforcing the statute almost exclusively against Black people, particularly in African-American neighborhoods or in parts of the City in which African Americans come in contact with Whites.

CENSUS“We Can’t Count on Washington”: A California Funder Preps for the 2020 Census (Inside Philanthropy, 9/12)

ENVIRONMENT | How Alexandria is pushing flood mitigation measures and other methods to adjust to climate change. (GGWash, 9/13)

ARTS & HUMANITIES | A new art exhibit in Maryland explores how we “conceptualize, scrutinize and give value to the human form“. (DCist, 9/13)

BUSINESSGreater Washington has waited for months. Here’s what Jeff Bezos finally had to say about HQ2. (WBJ, 9/13)

INCOME | Household incomes increased across the region last year but there was still a wide gap in racial group earnings, especially in the District. (WaPo, 9/13)


Social Sector Job Openings 

Institutional Fundraising Coordinator | Shakespeare Theatre Company– New!
Grants Manager | Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
Development Manager | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations
Vice-President for Development and Communications | Coalition for Nonprofit Housing and Economic Development (CNHED)
Development Manager | Leadership Greater Washington
Senior Managing Director, Finance & Operations | Flamboyan Foundation
Institutional Giving Associate | Brady Campaign & Center to Prevent Gun Violence
Director, Institutional Giving | Brady Campaign & Center to Prevent Gun Violence
Events Manager | Public Welfare Foundation
Major Gifts Officer | L’Arche Greater Washington D.C.
Manager of Program & Evaluation Services | BoardSource
Programs Officer | DC Bar Foundation
Executive Vice President, Development and Communications | Northern Virginia Family Service
Director, Corporate and Foundation Relations | Northern Virginia Family Service
Adult Education Specialist | BoardSource
Senior Director, Evaluation and Learning | Flamboyan Foundation
Major Gifts Officer | Food & Friends

Hiring? Post your job on WRAG’s job board and get it included in the Daily! Free for members; $60/60 days for non-members. Details here.


Community Calendar

To add an event to WRAG’s community calendar, email Rebekah Seder. Click here to view the community calendar.


The Weather Channel released a cool but frightening simulation about what could happen in a hurricane.

– Kendra

A new lawsuit alleges that DC has failed to provide adequate mental health care to youth

HEALTH | A coalition of disability rights organizations in DC have filed a class-action lawsuit against the city, alleging that it has failed to provide adequate mental health services to youth. (WaPo, 8/14)

The suit, filed in federal court Tuesday on behalf of two unnamed minors, states that the District did not give the children access to intensive outpatient counseling and mentoring programs.

As a result, they were repeatedly institutionalized at psychiatric facilities, violating the District’s obligations to provide the least restrictive care possible under Medicaid and the Americans With Disabilities Act, according to the lawsuit.

WORKFORCE | Advocates from DC’s homeless community want the city to do more outreach about its First Source program, which is a law that gives DC residents first priority in hiring for new jobs. (Street Sense, 8/14)

HUMAN RIGHTS
– Preliminary estimates show that the District spent at least $2.6 million last weekend protecting the 20 to 30 white supremacists that came to attend the Unite the Right 2 rally. (WaPo, 8/14)

– Crystal City Hyatt Will Host An Anti-Muslim Group’s Annual Conference (DCist, 8/14)

IMMIGRATION
– The US Citizenship and Immigration Services has been conspiring with ICE to tell them when immigrants eligible for deportation came to the CIS office for routine interviews. (WaPo, 8/15)

– The history of the United States’ policy of separating migrant families. (Atlantic, 8/14)

CENSUS | Two Congress members have introduced a bill to include questions about sexual orientation and gender identity in the census and the annual American Community Survey. (Washington Blade, 7/31)


Find out where DC’s new murals will go.

– Kendra