Tag: Bill Hanbury

Give to the Max was a huge success…Richard England on philanthropy…Fannie Mae opens foreclosure center in Prince George’s [News, 11.10.11]

GIVE TO THE MAX | It was an exciting 24 hours yesterday! The final totals are that 17,839 people donated $1,886,584. With additional award money, the grand total raised was $2,034,584. Not too shabby!

Give to the Max organizers Terri Freeman of the Community Foundation and Bill Hanbury of the United Way are proud of the results. Terri says:

“This region continues to demonstrate its ability to unite and rally around a call to action, and the results from our first ever Give to the Max Day prove it.”

And Bill is excited about what participation in Give to the Max reveals about new directions in fundraising:

“In addition to raising $2 million, we are thrilled to see how many of our nonprofit members participated and maximized all the benefits of learning more about online fundraising and putting those skills to good use.”

COMMUNITY | As we prepare to honor our nation’s veterans tomorrow, we asked World War II veteran Mr. Richard England, who lost his hearing at Guadalcanal, to reflect on philanthropy – what it means to him, what advice he has for new philanthropists, and how funders can support our nation’s veterans. (WG Daily, 11/10)

WORKFORCE | A new survey finds that one of every five U.S. employers is looking to hire veterans, but “vets re-entering the corporate workforce don’t always properly market their unique skills.” (WBJ, 11/10)

HOUSING | Fannie Mae opens foreclosure center in Greenbelt (WTOP, 11/10) “Prince George’s County has the highest number of foreclosures in Maryland and [one] of the highest rates in the region.”

EDUCATION
Election pumps new blood into Fairfax school board (Examiner, 11/10) The board has six new members.

DCPS has opened a diagnostic center aimed at identifying children who might need special education. (WaPo, 11/9)

SOCIAL MEDIA | As we wrap-up Give to the Max Day, Tamara Copeland considers how social media is changing philanthropy and how these changes take some adjustment of perspective to appreciate (NPQ, 11/10):

In just the last few years, we’ve seen traditional philanthropy morph in interesting ways. We can give directly to causes all over the world with our smartphones. No intermediaries needed… Forget due diligence. Forget informed program officers looking at logic models, program plans, and evaluation models. Has the head and/or heart philanthropy debate already become a bit passé?

WEEKEND | This isn’t an endorsement, but just something that caught my attention as a movie nerd and Smithsonian fan. Groupon is selling $4 tickets to Smithsonian IMAX movies which can be redeemed starting today. IMAX and a museum visit is a nice weekend activity!


Hope you all enjoy the long weekend. We’re excitedly preparing for our big annual meeting next week at Arena Stage and hope to see you there.

In honor of Veteran’s Day, here’s a heartfelt clip from one of my favorite movies.

– christian

Arts organizations concerned about jobs bill…Give to the Max on Nov. 9…Teachers get “Standing Ovation” [News, 9.20.11]

President Obama’s new jobs stimulus plan would limit tax deductions on charitable donations made by high-income individuals, which is causing concern for arts groups that are already coping with declining donations (WaPo, 9/20).

Marlie Mattson, vice president of development for the Kennedy Center, says:

“In general, I think it’s fair to say that it’s very difficult to continually find contributed income in support of the arts…It’s a very challenging environment already. Whatever happens on the national landscape that limits that income is problematic for sure.”

Americans for the Arts’ Bob Lynch is concerned as well, but optimistic that other aspects of the bill could benefits arts and humanities organizations:

Among others, he cited the proposed cut in the payroll tax, which could spur hiring within arts organizations and free up additional spending money; more federal support of schools, which could lead to the hiring and rehiring of arts-education teachers; and more spending on infrastructure projects, which could create more public art projects.

GIVING | Mark your calendars! Give to the Max Day is November 9th. The Community Foundation’s Terri Freeman and the United Way’s Bill Hanbury are really excited for it. You should be, too! (WG Daily, 9/20)

EDUCATION
– Prince George’s County Public Schools Superintendent William Hite has been appointed to the National Parent Teacher Association’s board of directors. (Examiner, 9/20)

Related: WRAG members met with Hite and County Executive Rushern Baker in June to discuss education reform in the county. (WG Daily, 7/7)

– Bill Turque writes about last night’s Standing Ovation event honoring the District’s best educators. (WaPo, 9/20) Tamara attended and tweeted about the event. (@WRAGprez)

YOUTH | Members of WRAG’s Children, Youth, and Families Working Group heard from children’s mental health experts earlier this month. (WG Daily, 9/20)

HOUSING | Md. Housing Dept. Moving To New Carrollton (WAMU, 9/20)

ECONOMY | Some positive news: Commercial construction rebounds in metro Washington (Region Forward, 9/20)


Here’s the first look at Clint Eastwood’s J. Edgar, which filmed around the region earlier this year.

While I’m on the subject, I’d love to hear your input on a debate I recently had. Do you pronounce the word “biopic” as bio pic or bi-opic? I say bio pic, since it is really just shorthand for biographical picture. The other way sounds like a medical procedure. Feel free to comment below!

Funders announce one-day online giving push for November [News, 9.15.11]

At a press conference at Martha’s Table yesterday, the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region’s Terri Freeman and the United Way of the National Capital Area’s Bill Hanbury announced that November 9th will be Give to the Max Day. The event is being promoted by the entire 8 Neighbors group representing nonprofit, business, philanthropic, and government leaders, and will be a one-day push, supported by online fundraiser Razoo, with a goal of raising $3 million in donations and grants for area nonprofits.

In the Washington Post, Bill Hanbury points out the advantages of an online push (WaPo, 9/16):

More and more consumers, individual donors, are turning to online giving…In some ways, we’ve gotten outmaneuvered by digital applications. This will let us jump over workplace giving.

Terri Freeman says the time is right:

The economic news isn’t getting any better, and the government funding is down… We’re the nation’s capital. We ought to be able to do this in grand style.

And Tamara Copeland notes:

Eighty percent of giving nationally is from individuals…[s]o the foundation community is particularly supportive of this concentrated effort to build a larger base of the support for the local nonprofit sector.

We’ll have more on Monday, including a message from Bill and Terri.

ARTS | In partnership with foundations, corporations, and government agencies, the National Endowment for the Arts has announced a new grants program called ArtPlace, which seeks to promote arts and culture as catalysts for economic growth in 34 cities around the country (New York Times, 9/14).

D.C. is one of the cities, with a grant to the Office of Planning to support Arts and Culture Temporiums in Anacostia, Brookland, Central 14th Street, and Deanwood (ArtPlace, 9/15).

Related: In 2009, Americans for the Arts president and CEO Bob Lynch told funders: To fix the economy, fund the arts (WG Daily, 2/9/09).

REGION | Fairfax chairman candidates debate development, housing, transit (WaPo, 9/15)

Related: A delegation of WRAG members recently met with Sharon Bulova, chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, to introduce her to the collective of funders working in, interested in, and funding in Fairfax County, and to explore opportunities for a richer partnership.

Related: Tamara asks, “Who are we? What are we? What is our name?” (WG Daily, 9/16)

EDUCATION | While SAT scores declined regionally and nationally this year, Montgomery County Hispanic students, who make up 25 percent of the public schools’ student body, actually raised their scores by eight points (Examiner, 9/15).

Related: WRAG members – Don’t miss the chance to meet Dr. Joshua Starr, the new superintendent of Montgomery County Public Schools, on September 28.

WORKFORCE | Gray plans tax credits to help get D.C. residents hired (TBD, 9/15)

POVERTY | The D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute takes a preliminary look at census data on food stamp participation and employment and health insurance levels and suggests that poverty likely increased in the District in 2010 (DCFPI, 9/13). The Census Bureau will release more in-depth state level data next week.

YOUTH | The Post profiles a group of ex-offenders in Ward 7 who are trying to address the problems of youth violence in their neighborhoods by walking through their community and engaging with kids on their way to school (WaPo, 9/16).


– Rebekah