Tag: Arlington

Efforts to shed light on housing affordability in the region and beyond

HOUSING
Over the past six months, Leadership Greater Washington, in partnership with WRAG, has hosted a thought-leadership series on housing affordability. Last week’s session on regional solutions featured the Roadmap for Our Region’s Economic Future, the Greater Washington Housing Leaders Group, and WRAG’s Our Region, Your Investment initiative – all efforts in which WRAG is very involved. The Washington Post published a story on the importance of housing affordability to our region and focused specifically on the work of the Greater Washington Housing Leaders Group. (WaPo, 5/28)

[…] a group of local leaders representing government, business and the philanthropic sector is studying whether to propose a “regional compact” in which the Washington area as a whole would commit to addressing runaway housing costs.

If nothing is done, they warn, the problem of overpriced housing will fester until it eventually explodes into a widely recognized crisis — much as the Metro transit system’s problems were ignored for years until they recently triggered a burst of attention.

Gretchen Greiner-Lott, who leads these efforts for WRAG, had this to say of the coverage:

Solving big issues takes collaboration. The Greater Washington Housing Leaders Group is just that – a regional, cross-sector collaboration of committed folks working on the issue. I am so pleased to see our work highlighted in the media.

– A new report released by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, along with an interactive website supported by JPMorgan Chase, provide a close look at the disparity between rental housing costs and renter income in every jurisdiction in the U.S. In order to be able to afford a modest, two-bedroom apartment in D.C., one would need to earn $31.21 an hour; $26.53 an hour in Maryland; and $22.44 an hour in Virginia. (NLIHC, 5/25)

– A new report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities examines a decline in federal support for housing aid for families with children. Despite the damaging effects of the Great Recession to many families with children, the share of federal housing assistance that went to those families declined over the last several years. (City Lab, 5/26)

COMMUNITY 
– The Council on Foundations recently named Floyd Mills as its Vice President of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. This role is a new position “intended to advance the Council’s work to promote inclusiveness as a fundamental operating principal in philanthropic organizations.” (COF, 5/23)

– Trustee, member of the board of directors, and Veterans Liaison for the PwC Charitable Foundation, Frank Guadio, recently sat with The Huffington Post to discuss best practices for collaboration on issues related to veterans. (HuffPo, 5/25)

REGION
– An annual ranking by the Trust for the Public Land places D.C. at number three and Arlington at number four on its list of the best U.S. cities for parks. Factors to determine the ranking included: accessibility; amenities; size; and the amount of money spent per resident on parks. (WaPo, 5/26)

– Loudoun County Reportedly the “Happiest” County in America (Washingtonian, 5/31)


A new art exhibit appeals to the procrastinator and/or perfectionist in all of us. 

– Ciara

Homelessness rises unevenly across the region

HOMELESSNESS/REGION
The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments recently shared the results of the Annual Point-in-Time Count of Persons Experiencing Homelessness. Overall in the region, the homeless population rose by five percent from 2015 to 2016, though not spread evenly across the area. The report urges more aggressive action to bring affordable housing to families in Greater Washington. (WAMU, 5/11)

According to the Annual Point-in-Time Count of Persons Experiencing Homelessness […] there were 12,215 people who were homeless across the nine local jurisdictions that participate in the yearly census, which took place on Jan. 28.

That’s up from the 11,623 homeless people in the region at the same time last year.

[…]

In D.C., the number of homeless people increased by 14 percent, while it went up by 12 percent in Frederick County. Things went in the opposite direction for the rest of the region, though. In Arlington County, Loudoun County and the City of Alexandria, the number of homeless people decreased by 27, 20 and 16 percent, respectively.

The full report can be accessed here.

– The number of homeless families in D.C. has risen by more than 30 percent in comparison with a year ago. Further, the District’s homeless children and their parents outnumbered homeless single adults for the first time since the annual census began in 2001. (WaPo, 5/11)

RACISM/COMMUNITY
–  In a letter to the editor of the Chronicle of Philanthropy, WRAG president Tamara Copeland calls on organizations to talk about racism, and reflects on how the topic of diversity is sometimes used to deflect deeper conversations about race and racism in society. (Chronicle, 5/12).

– In his most recent blog post adapted from a panel presentation at last week’s GEO conference, Rick Moyers, vice president for programs and communications at the Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation, summarizes Meyer’s experience with the 28 organizations they’ve supported in implementing the Benevon Model for increasing individual giving. His take away? “I wish we’d known at the outset that the goal was to change organizational culture.” (Meyer, 5/11)

Related: Rick is the first speaker in WRAG’s Nonprofit Summer Learning Series. Catch him on June 23 addressing The Dos & Don’ts of Working with Grantmakers!

ECONOMY/REGION | Region’s innovation economy needs boost or risks being ‘laggards’ (WBJ, 5/12)

MARYLAND | Study: Gaithersburg Is The Most Diverse City In America (DCist, 5/11)

HEALTH | A new study finds a 44 percent increase in hospitalizations for ischemic (the most common type) strokes among people ages 25 to 44, despite a 20 percent overall drop among all Americans. (WaPo, 5/11)


Conference calls, you’re the worst! Well…maybe not the worst, but honestly, does anyone actually enjoy them?

– Ciara

Friday roundup – April 18 through April 22, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG
 In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland discussed the progression of the Putting Racism on the Table series and how it’s about more than just learning. (Daily,4/21)

– Jessica Finkel, Philanthropy Fellow at Kaiser Permanente, shared how her experience working with the organization’s Community Benefit department helped her discover a passion for policy and public health. (Daily, 3/20)

THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
Consumer Health Foundation president and WRAG board member Yanique Redwood discussed how marijuana-related incarcerations have devastated communities of color for years, citing points from WRAG’s recent Putting Racism on the Table session on mass incarceration, featuring speaker James Bell, J.D. of the W. Haywood Burns Institute. (CHF, 4/20)

Inter-American Development Bank launched a newly-revamped Improving Lives grants program, open to nonprofit organizations serving low-income Latin American and Caribbean communities in the Washington metropolitan area. The program will combine five grants of up to $50,000 each with skills-based volunteering, and is aimed at promoting innovative projects involving community and economic development, health and well-being, education or the arts. Eligible organizations in the region may apply for grants by submitting proposals before 6 pm (EST) May 19, 2016. For more information, please read the requirements or write to idbcommunityrelations@iadb.org.

THIS WEEK IN THE REGION/ECONOMY
– Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker spoke on his vision for making the jurisdiction a high-demand area for business in his recent State of the Economy address. (WBJ, 4/13)

– While Arlington County’s population continues to grow, the number of jobs continues to decline, according to recent data. (ARLnow, 4/20)

THIS WEEK IN THE WORKFORCE
Here are three key tools organizations in the social sector can use to build more diverse workplaces and address persistent institutional biases. (SSIR, 4/14)

 Lack of Training for Young Nonprofit Workers Means Too Few Potential Leaders (Chronicle, 4/19) Subscription required


WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


Calendar won’t display? Click here.


Can you remember these viral dance moves from the past ten years?

– Ciara

Committing to change

WRAG/PHILANTHROPY
In her latest blog post, WRAG president Tamara Lucas Copeland discusses the progression of the Putting Racism on the Table series. It’s more than just learning. (Daily, 4/21)

I am proud of the commitment that philanthropy has made to this learning journey. People who felt that they were sensitive to and understood racism have learned that it is far more nuanced, unconscious, and institutionalized than many would think. We have achieved the goal of knowledge gain. But, this isn’t learning just for the sake of learning.

Philanthropy has been referred to as society’s passing gear. Its position provides a platform for societal change that goes well beyond dollars.

COMMUNITY | The JP Morgan Chase Institute recently released a study tracking and evaluating the spending and saving patterns of millions of their banking customers in 15 metro areas in order to show important trends in how spending has changed due to temporary and more permanent income changes. The data offer important insights to companies, governments, and social profit organizations on the actual economic status of a community. (USCCF, 4/8)

VIRGINIA/ECONOMY | According to new county data, while Arlington’s population continues to grow, the number of jobs continues to decline. (ARLnow, 4/20)

MASS INCARCERATION/SOCIAL JUSTICE | OpinionWhy Mass Incarceration Doesn’t Pay (NYT, 4/21)

SOCIAL PROFITS | Compass, a provider of pro bono consulting services to social profit organizations that benefit the Greater Washington community, has opened their 2016-2017 client application. Each client will receive approximately $150,000 of strategic consulting services free of charge. This year, Compass expects to select 20-25 nonprofits. Click here to learn more.


A brief history of the “romantic” things that people have done in movies that you absolutely, positively should not do in real life.

– Ciara

Complicated cases for Central American migrants to the U.S.

IMMIGRATION
For the many Central American migrants who have fled their homes to come to the United States, immigration court cases can often come down to a single question (WAMU, 2/25):

When is a migrant a refugee?

[…]

Since about 2009, many more Central American migrants — including many minors — are making the trip north and seeking asylum.

The reasons for the increase are fairly easy to explain. They parallel the ebb and flow of violent crime in the region. As the homicide rate spiked in Mexico, so did asylum applications; as San Pedro Sula became the murder capital of the world, asylum applications from Honduras increased. The U.N.’s refugee agency has interviewed hundreds ofwomen and children who have crossed the U.S. border over the past couple of years, and a vast majority of them said they were fleeing violence from organized crime.

– Consumer Health Foundation board member Silvia Salazar, discusses the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids that began in January, and the opportunity the philanthropic community has to get involved. (CHF, 2/24)

– Amid reports that a number of families in the school system have grown fearful of sending their children to school for risk of deportation, Arlington Public Schools are working to reassure worried parents. (WaPo, 2/25)

RACIAL EQUITY
– Rose Ann Cleveland, executive director of The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation and a member of the WRAG board, candidly shares her experience of witnessing racial inequality growing up in North Carolina, and how she came to realize that society treated certain people differently. (Daily, 2/25)

Opinion: When it comes to the highly-publicized #OscarsSoWhite controversy – in which movie fans and members of the entertainment industry’s workforce have openly criticized the lack of diversity in Hollywood – some parallels can be drawn to the lack of diversity within the social profit sector, according to one CEO.  (Chronicle, 2/25)

PHILANTHROPY | Exponent Philanthropy, the Fund for Shared Insight, and the Chronicle of Philanthropy present the next video in their new series called Philanthropy Lessons, in which funders share their experiences and what they’ve learned in their philanthropic careers. Check out the video and stay tuned for more through June.

COMMUNITY
– The Fund for Children, Youth, and Families at The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region is accepting request for proposals. Proposals must be submitted through the online application system no later than 4:00 PM, Thursday, March 31, and final grant decisions will be announced in August. Eligibility requirements, proposal guidelines, and submission instructions are available at www.fund4cyf.org.

 The Community Food Rescue Mini-Grants Program, available to help social profit organizations build infrastructure and increase capacity for the food recovery system, is accepting applications until March 1.For more information, contact Astoria Aviles.

ECONOMY
– Eighteen months following the opening of the first stations along WMATA’s Silver Line, economic development surrounding the stations is said to be taking off. (Inside NoVa, 2/23)

–  Low-Income Programs Not Driving Nation’s Long-Term Fiscal Problem (CBPP, 2/24)


Did you read today’s post while sitting at your desk eating lunch? Stop doing that! We’ll be here when you get back.

– Ciara

Reported HIV cases decrease for seventh year in a row

HIV/AIDS
According to a new report released by the D.C. Department of Health, the number of reported annual new HIV cases is down for the seventh consecutive year. (DCist, 2/2)

The report shows preliminary data for 2014, which includes 396 new HIV cases – a 29 percent decrease from the 553 cases reported in 2013. The highest number of HIV cases was reported in 2007 with 1,333 cases. Since then, numbers are down by 70 percent.

Executive director of the Washington AIDS Partnership, Channing Wickham, had this to say of the news:

I’m very pleased to see the hard work of the nonprofit community, the D.C. Department of Health, and the HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB Administration (HAHSTA) reflected in the latest data for new HIV cases.  At the same time, it’s imperative to remember the thousands of District residents who are living with HIV and the need to continue and expand HIV prevention efforts.

REGION/ECONOMY | A new study by the Brookings Institution ranks the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria area against 99 other metro regions in the U.S. in terms of recovery from the Great Recession. The study rates the D.C. area’s performance as: 71st in “growth;” 91st in “prosperity;” 72nd in “inclusion;” and 77th in “inclusion by race.” (DCist, 2/2)

HOUSING/DISTRICT | Some 7,300 households rely on public housing in the District. With a number of public housing properties slated for overdue rehabilitation or replacement, DC Fiscal Policy Institute shares some of the risks this could cause for families who may be displaced, and offers recommendations for their protection. (DCFPI, 1/27)

WORKFORCE/SOCIAL PROFITS | Hiring Keeps Rising at Nonprofits in N.Y and D.C., Study Says (Chronicle, 2/2)  Subscription required

YOUTH/EDUCATION
– The District and the D.C. Public Library have announced a new program, Books from Birth, that will send enrolled children a book every month until the age of five. The program is a partnership between the city and the Dollywood Foundation. (WCP, 2/2)

How Rich Parents Can Exacerbate School Inequality (Atlantic, 1/28)

ARTS/RACIAL EQUITY | Opinion: A writer shares his experiences witnessing slotting, tokenism, and dehumanization in the nonprofit theater sector. (NPQ, 1/29)

POVERTY | OpinionWhat Data Can Do To Fight Poverty (NYT, 1/29)


The Washingtonian presents a guide to successfully living in Washington, D.C.

– Ciara

A snapshot of women in the Washington region’s workforce

WOMEN/WORKFORCE
In their new issue brief, the Washington Area Women’s Foundation looks at working women in the region – with particular attention to low-income women – and examines some of the strategies used to build economic security. The brief, supported by Capital One, also includes recommendations for advocates, employers, funders, policymakers, and individuals to help advance circumstances for women through education and job training. (WAWF, 9/2015)

Our goal is to build better opportunities for our region’s women and girls, so that they can become agents of change in their own families and communities. In this issue brief, we focus on promising approaches to building economic security for women through workforce development.

COMMUNITY/CSR | The Community Foundation for Northern Virginia published their second issue of GOOD Business, highlighting the work of local companies supporting the community through employee engagement activities and CSR programs that benefit the region. (CFNV, 8/27)

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
– In Montgomery County, Maryland, extreme rent hikes in a longstanding apartment property highlight the much larger issue of affordable housing getting further out of reach for less affluent residents. (WaPo, 9/5)

– D.C.’s Deanwood neighborhood has been chosen out of a handful of cities to become home to sustainable, green technology-equipped  affordable housing  by the International Living Future Institute, a Seattle-based environment nonprofit organization. (WCP, 9/8)

EDUCATION | Recent studies have looked into the long-lasting effects of chronic absenteeism (missing at least 10 percent of classroom time during a school year) – patterns that often begin as early as preschool and kindergarten. (Atlantic, 9/1)

HOMELESSNESS/VETERANS | D.C. On Track to ‘End’ Veteran Homelessness By Year’s End (WCP, 9/4)

PHILANTHROPY/POVERTY | Opinion: A writer argues that, while much attention has been given to the plight of minorities experiencing poverty in urban areas, philanthropy has historically overlooked poverty among whites, especially in more rural areas. (Chronicle, 9/3)

TRANSIT | On Columbia Pike, Plan B is for Buses (WAMU, 9/3)


Test your knowledge of foreign affairs and geography with this quiz.

– Ciara

The push for more flexible DCPS graduation requirements reemerges

EDUCATION
Picking up on a previously stalled attempt to bring about more flexible graduation requirements for DCPS students, the D.C. State Board of Education plans to launch a task force to develop recommendations for awarding credit. (WaPo, 7/30)

The proposal would move the District away from a system based solely on the age-old “Carnegie unit,” which grants credit according to seat time in favor of a system that rewards how much a student knows or can do.

[…]

Proponents say students often need more or less time to demonstrate their understanding of a subject. And seat time requirements make it difficult for students who drop out or fall behind to catch up and pursue a diploma, an increasingly important consideration as the District works to improve its graduation rate and bring back young people who have dropped out.

HIV/AIDS | Today, the White House unveils an updated national strategy to progress in the fight against HIV/AIDS. (White House, 7/30)

ECONOMY
– Interview: Director of Arlington Economic Development Victor L. Hoskins discusses the future of the county and how it can rise to face the challenges that could prohibit economic growth there. (WaPo, 7/29)

– A new study examines the debt burdens for Americans across generations. According to data, 80 percent of Americans have some form of debt and many are carrying it well into their later years. (NPR, 7/29)

CHILDREN/DISTRICT| Coalition Forms To Bring Universal Child Care to D.C. (DCist, 7/29)

HOUSING
– The Montgomery County Council approved tax credits for low-income renters as the area looks to become more urban with upcoming development. Few people are expected to qualify. (WAMU, 7/29)

Latino Incomes Are Rising, So Why Are Their Homeownership Rates Dropping? (City Lab, 7/29)

ARTS | The Shakespeare Theatre Company will extend its annual Free For All Program to each mainstage show this season, in an effort to make the arts more accessible to the community. (WaPo, 7/30)

PHILANTHROPY | Are you looking for ways to make your nonprofit reporting requirements more thoughtful and meaningful for all involved? Here are some tips to further develop guidelines. (CEP, 7/28)

COMMUNITY | The Community Foundation for Northern Virginia’s Business Women’s Giving Circle has launched its second annual grant cycle to support nonprofit organizations and schools that provide STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), Entrepreneurship and/or Leadership programs to girls in K-12 public schools, colleges and universities. Interested applicants can learn more here.


What do you do when your toddler is obsessed with a personal injury lawyer’s commercials on television? You throw him a personal injury lawyer-themed birthday party, of course!

– Ciara 

A decline in the region’s “millennial boom”

REGION/ECONOMY
While D.C. experienced a “millennial boom,” in which 1,300 young adults were relocating to the city each month, in recent years those figures have started to wane, causing a number of industries to brace themselves for the impact. So far, however, the decline has not been all bad (WaPo, 7/17):

Census data released last month indicates that the District’s incredible growth in young adults, ages 25 to 34, has stalled. After adding 10,430 people in that age bracket between 2010 and 2011, D.C. added a net of just 2,662 of them from 2013 to 2014.

Surrounding counties, including Arlington, Montgomery and Fairfax, have become even less attractive. Each lost more millennials than they added from 2013 to 2014.

[…]

There are differing views on why the boom in young arrivals has waned. One is the cuts to federal jobs and spending. D.C. lost 11,800 public sector jobs in the past four years, according to the District’s chief financial officer. In just a three-year period from 2010-2012, Virginia experienced $9.8 billion in defense cuts.

[…]

[…] the newest data show that despite the slowdown in millennial arrivals, older workers — those between 35 and 44 — are finding more opportunities in the bread-and-butter industries that have made up the area’s economy historically. That age group has grown at least 3 percent each of the past four years in D.C., a much more steady trajectory than millennial growth.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING |  In D.C.’s Chinatown, Chinese American residents watch as new residential developments take shape, demographics change, and remaining in the area becomes more difficult. (WaPo. 7/16)

DISTRICT/HEALTH | Washington City Paper explores the need to expand access to naloxone, a drug that reverses the symptoms of opioid overdoses, in the District. Advocates and health providers say that reducing the barriers to obtaining the drug would save lives. (WCP, 7/17)

HOMELESSNESS/VETERANS | Advocates Say That Ending Homelessness Among Veterans Is Achievable (WAMU, 7/15)

CHILDREN/EDUCATION | A newly-released study examining the social-emotional behavior of nearly 800 kindergartners since 1991 found that students who got along well with peers, were willing to share, and were considered cooperative, were more likely to go on to earn a college degree, hold a full-time job by 25, and avoid substance abuse problems. (WaPo, 7/16)

TRANSIT | Construction of the Purple Line project could begin in mid-May. (WBJ, 7/17)


So….Buffalo, NY still has a snow pile in the middle of July…

– Ciara

Report finds rate of black children in poverty holds steady

CHILDREN/POVERTY
Analyzing data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Pew Research Center has released a new report on American children living in poverty. Though the overall share of U.S. children in poverty declined slightly from 2010 to 2013, not every group has fared well as the economy recovers (Pew Research, 7/14):

Overall, 20% of children in the U.S., or 14.7 million, lived in poverty in 2013 – down from 22%, or 16.3 million, in 2010. (Poverty in 2013 was defined as living in a household with an annual income below $23,624 for a family of four with two related children.) During this period, the poverty rate declined for Hispanic, white and Asian children. Among black children, however, the rate held steady at about 38%. Black children were almost four times as likely as white or Asian children to be living in poverty in 2013, and significantly more likely than Hispanic children.

WRAG/PHILANTHROPY/CHILDREN | Following the recent tragic death of a nine-year-old boy after a brutal beating by his mother’s boyfriend, WRAG president Tamara Copeland asks whether philanthropy is doing enough to improve circumstances for children before things go this far. (WaPo, 7/6 and Daily, 7/14)

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
– Arlington County has released a series of public service announcements aimed at bringing attention to the great need for affordable housing in the area and the benefits it can bring. (ARLnow, 7/13)

Many American cities are smaller than they used to be, so why do they feel so full? (Vox, 7/13)

ARTS/HOUSING | After 10 years, Capital Fringe has become more than just a theater festival. It has evolved into what may soon become a neighborhood institution and affordable housing space for emerging artists. (WCP, 7/10)

WOMEN/WORKFORCE | Women Are More Likely to Work Multiple Jobs Than Men (EPI, 7/9)

EVENTS | A group of Georgetown University students has partnered with the D.C. Department of Small and Local Business Development to host Venture DC: Engaging Diverse Changemakers – an event to catalyze and support innovation and entrepreneurship in the District, particularly in wards 7 and 8. The two-day event will be held on July 31st and August 1st at the RISE Demonstration Center in Southeast DC, and will showcase entrepreneurs with solutions applicable to wards 7 and 8 and then connect them to social impact sector leaders and potential investors. Information about the event and agenda can be found at venturedc.org.


Let’s take a quick trip to Manhattan’s Soho neighborhood. How many homes do you think you could buy in other cities for the price of one SoHo apartment?

– Ciara