Tag: Alexandria

Friday roundup – June 13 through June 17, 2016

THIS WEEK AT WRAG
– The Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation has made a $500,000 investment in Our Region, Your Investment. (Daily, 6/16)

– The Putting Racism on the Table learning series may be over, but the lessons will endure. In this blog post, Julie Wagner of CareFirst and Terri Copeland of PNC shared some of their deepest insights and major takeaways from the series. (Daily, 6/13)

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION
– Natalie Wexler, trustee of the Omega Foundation, explained how schools can better teach kids to read. (Hint: it’s not by teaching reading comprehensive strategies.) (Daily, 6/14)

– Some Alexandria City Public School students are alleging  “excessive, discriminatory and reckless approach[es] to discipline” from the school system. The Kojo Nnamdi Show explores those claims and the supporting research behind the students’ argument. (WaPo, 6/3 and WAMU, 6/16)

THIS WEEK IN LGBT NEWS/THIS WEEK IN THE WRAG COMMUNITY
– The Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers will be co-hosting a national teleconference for funders on Wednesday, June 22 at 11:00 am ET, for funders concerned about the Orlando tragedy and how best they may respond. Register for the call co-hosted by ABFE, Funders for LGBTQ Issues, Change Philanthropy, AAPIP, and Hispanics in Philanthropy.

– WRAG’s colleague organization, the Florida Philanthropic Network, posted a list of resources for those who want to provide financial assistance to those affected by the mass shooting in Orlando.

Wells Fargo announced a donation of $300,000 toward victims and community recovery through the OneOrlando fund, set up by the City of Orlando and administered by the Central Florida Foundation.

– The Council on Foundations shared a resource guide created by Funders for LGBTQ Issues featuring Orlando’s local LGBTQ social profit organizations and fundraising efforts for victims.

– The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region has also shared resources for those who want to help.


JOBS

Senior Manager, Programs | Grantmakers for Effective Organizations | Deadline: 06/17/2016
Program Officer | Washington Area Women’s Foundation | Deadline: 06/19/2016
Associate | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Research Assistant | Innovation Network, Inc. | Deadline: 07/01/2016
Philanthropic Services Associate | The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
Grants Manager | The Norman & Ruth Rales Foundation
Community Impact Director | Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing
Senior Communication Consultant | Kaiser Permanente
Part Time Bookkeeper/Accountant | ACT for Alexandria
Associate Director | Arabella Advisors
Director, Corporate Philanthropy | Council on Foundations
D.C. PrEP for Women Project Coordinator | Washington AIDS Partnership
Visit WRAG’s Job Board for the latest job openings in the region’s social sector.

WRAG’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Click the image below to access WRAG’S Community Calendar. To have your event included, please send basic information including event title, date/time, location, a brief description of the event, and a link for further details to: myers@washingtongrantmakers.org.


This just may be the sweetest Internet search ever conducted.

– Ciara

New report closely examines racial and ethnic incarceration disparities in each state

MASS INCARCERATION/RACISM
A new report examines the rates of incarceration for whites, African Americans, and Hispanics state-by-state, finds three contributing factors to the racial and ethnic disparities in those rates, and makes some recommendations for reform. (Sentencing Project, 6/14)

Truly meaningful reforms to the criminal justice system cannot be accomplished without acknowledgement of racial and ethnic disparities in the prison system, and focused attention on reduction of disparities. Since the majority of people in prison are sentenced at the state level rather than the federal level, it is critical to understand the variation in racial and ethnic composition across states, and the policies and the day-to-day practices that contribute to this variance. Incarceration creates a host of collateral consequences that include restricted employment prospects, housing instability, family disruption, stigma, and disenfranchisement.

Related: In the most recently released video of WRAG’s Putting Racism on the Table series, James Bell, J.D., founder and executive director of the W. Haywood Burns Institute, discussed mass incarceration and how structural racism, white privilege, and implicit bias collide within the criminal justice system.

OUR REGION, YOUR INVESTMENT | Our Region, Your Investment is gaining traction with local investors, with a recent $500,000 investment from the Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation. Says Joshua Bernstein, president of the foundation (Daily, 6/16):

The Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation is working to address the deficit in housing affordability in the D.C. area. An investment in the Enterprise Community Impact Note aligns our investment strategy with our mission and leverages our impact.  We are grateful for the opportunity that Our Region, Your Investment has created to invest funds in ways that promote additional investment in housing solutions.

COMMUNITY/LGBT/PHILANTHROPY | Following the recent tragedy in Orlando, a number of WRAG members have organized efforts to provide support to victims and their families or share valuable resources with those serving LGBT communities. Wells Fargo has announced a donation of $300,000 toward victims and community recovery through the OneOrlando fund, set up by the City of Orlando and administered by the Central Florida Foundation. The Council on Foundations has shared a resource guide created by Funders for LGBTQ Issues featuring Orlando’s local LGBTQ social profit organizations and fundraising efforts for the victims, and the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region has also shared resources for those who want to help.

EDUCATION/DISCRIMINATION/VIRGINIA | Students at Alexandria’s public schools are bringing to light what they describe as “excessive, discriminatory and reckless approach[es] to discipline” from the school system. Today, The Kojo Nnamdi Show explores those claims and the research that supports their argument. (WaPo, 6/3 and WAMU, 6/16)

Related: On Thursday, July 7, the third installment of WRAG’s Public Education Speaker Series (supported by The Omega Foundation and the Tiger Woods Foundation) tackles the topic of racial and gender disparities in school discipline, with Professor Anne Gregory of Rutgers University. WRAG members can click here to register.

ARTS/CULTURE African American Museum prepares for ‘a mini-inauguration’ (WaPo, 6/15)

PUBLIC HEALTHGun Violence ‘A Public Health Crisis,’ American Medical Association Says (NPR, 6/14)


Going back to school is tough at any age, but imagine going back to the 10th grade at age 68! This grandfather shows us it’s never too late.

– Ciara

New report examines Northern Virginia’s disparities in life expectancies

VIRGINIA/HEALTH
A new report from the Northern Virginia Health Foundation and the Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health looks at the disparities in life expectancy among Northern Virginia’s richest and poorest residents. While the area often tops rankings for happiness, health, etc, many residents are falling behind based on factors like education, income, and race. (WaPo, 6/7)

In Fairfax County alone, life expectancy ranges by as much as 10 years between western Lorton and eastern Lorton census tracts separated by four miles. In western Lorton, where the median household income is $133,413 and 12 percent of the population is black, the life expectancy is 89. In eastern Lorton, where the median income is $77,901 and 37 percent of residents are black, life expectancy drops to 79, according to the report.

[…]

“It’s about city planning, zoning and transportation issues,” said Patricia Mathews, the president of the health foundation.

Read the full report, A Study in Contrasts: Why Life Expectancy Varies in Northern Virginia.

HOUSING | In their Matters@Hand thought leadership series sponsored by Enterprise Community Partners, HAND shines a spotlight on the Roadmap for the Region’s Future Economy and efforts toward regional collaboration on affordable housing. (Helping Hands Blog, 6/6)

EDUCATION
– The U.S. Education Department has released the latest data from the Civil Rights Data Collection survey covering the 2013-2014 school year for more than 95,000 public schools. Check here for a quick glance at the numbers. (NPR, 6/7)

Related:  This data reveals deep racial inequities in the education system, including in how discipline is administered (for instance, that black preschoolers are 3.6 times more likely to be suspended than white preschoolers). Education funders are invited to join us for the next session in our Public Education Speaker Series on July 7, which will focus specifically on racial and gender disparities in school discipline and strategies for addressing them. More information can be found here.

Opinion: Two experts discuss how constant stress placed on children in poverty can take a toll on their mental and physical health, creating a need for better collaboration between schools and health providers. (WaPo, 6/6)

–  Homework Inequality: The Value of Having a Parent Around After School (Atlantic, 6/6)

WORKFORCE/LGBT | With more than 90 percent of transgender people experiencing some form of harassment in the workplace, the D.C. Office of Human Rights and the National LGBTQ Task Force have created a first-of-its-kind guide for employers for making work environments more accommodating. (WCP, 6/6)

SOCIAL PROFITS | The Center for Nonprofit Advancement is accepting nominations for the Gelman, Rosenberg & Freedman 2016 EXCEL Award until Friday, July 15, at 5:00 pm. The award recognizes outstanding leadership among Washington-area social profit organization chief executives.


Quiz time! How much do  you know about Africa?

– Ciara

Homelessness rises unevenly across the region

HOMELESSNESS/REGION
The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments recently shared the results of the Annual Point-in-Time Count of Persons Experiencing Homelessness. Overall in the region, the homeless population rose by five percent from 2015 to 2016, though not spread evenly across the area. The report urges more aggressive action to bring affordable housing to families in Greater Washington. (WAMU, 5/11)

According to the Annual Point-in-Time Count of Persons Experiencing Homelessness […] there were 12,215 people who were homeless across the nine local jurisdictions that participate in the yearly census, which took place on Jan. 28.

That’s up from the 11,623 homeless people in the region at the same time last year.

[…]

In D.C., the number of homeless people increased by 14 percent, while it went up by 12 percent in Frederick County. Things went in the opposite direction for the rest of the region, though. In Arlington County, Loudoun County and the City of Alexandria, the number of homeless people decreased by 27, 20 and 16 percent, respectively.

The full report can be accessed here.

– The number of homeless families in D.C. has risen by more than 30 percent in comparison with a year ago. Further, the District’s homeless children and their parents outnumbered homeless single adults for the first time since the annual census began in 2001. (WaPo, 5/11)

RACISM/COMMUNITY
–  In a letter to the editor of the Chronicle of Philanthropy, WRAG president Tamara Copeland calls on organizations to talk about racism, and reflects on how the topic of diversity is sometimes used to deflect deeper conversations about race and racism in society. (Chronicle, 5/12).

– In his most recent blog post adapted from a panel presentation at last week’s GEO conference, Rick Moyers, vice president for programs and communications at the Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foundation, summarizes Meyer’s experience with the 28 organizations they’ve supported in implementing the Benevon Model for increasing individual giving. His take away? “I wish we’d known at the outset that the goal was to change organizational culture.” (Meyer, 5/11)

Related: Rick is the first speaker in WRAG’s Nonprofit Summer Learning Series. Catch him on June 23 addressing The Dos & Don’ts of Working with Grantmakers!

ECONOMY/REGION | Region’s innovation economy needs boost or risks being ‘laggards’ (WBJ, 5/12)

MARYLAND | Study: Gaithersburg Is The Most Diverse City In America (DCist, 5/11)

HEALTH | A new study finds a 44 percent increase in hospitalizations for ischemic (the most common type) strokes among people ages 25 to 44, despite a 20 percent overall drop among all Americans. (WaPo, 5/11)


Conference calls, you’re the worst! Well…maybe not the worst, but honestly, does anyone actually enjoy them?

– Ciara

Reported HIV cases decrease for seventh year in a row

HIV/AIDS
According to a new report released by the D.C. Department of Health, the number of reported annual new HIV cases is down for the seventh consecutive year. (DCist, 2/2)

The report shows preliminary data for 2014, which includes 396 new HIV cases – a 29 percent decrease from the 553 cases reported in 2013. The highest number of HIV cases was reported in 2007 with 1,333 cases. Since then, numbers are down by 70 percent.

Executive director of the Washington AIDS Partnership, Channing Wickham, had this to say of the news:

I’m very pleased to see the hard work of the nonprofit community, the D.C. Department of Health, and the HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB Administration (HAHSTA) reflected in the latest data for new HIV cases.  At the same time, it’s imperative to remember the thousands of District residents who are living with HIV and the need to continue and expand HIV prevention efforts.

REGION/ECONOMY | A new study by the Brookings Institution ranks the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria area against 99 other metro regions in the U.S. in terms of recovery from the Great Recession. The study rates the D.C. area’s performance as: 71st in “growth;” 91st in “prosperity;” 72nd in “inclusion;” and 77th in “inclusion by race.” (DCist, 2/2)

HOUSING/DISTRICT | Some 7,300 households rely on public housing in the District. With a number of public housing properties slated for overdue rehabilitation or replacement, DC Fiscal Policy Institute shares some of the risks this could cause for families who may be displaced, and offers recommendations for their protection. (DCFPI, 1/27)

WORKFORCE/SOCIAL PROFITS | Hiring Keeps Rising at Nonprofits in N.Y and D.C., Study Says (Chronicle, 2/2)  Subscription required

YOUTH/EDUCATION
– The District and the D.C. Public Library have announced a new program, Books from Birth, that will send enrolled children a book every month until the age of five. The program is a partnership between the city and the Dollywood Foundation. (WCP, 2/2)

How Rich Parents Can Exacerbate School Inequality (Atlantic, 1/28)

ARTS/RACIAL EQUITY | Opinion: A writer shares his experiences witnessing slotting, tokenism, and dehumanization in the nonprofit theater sector. (NPQ, 1/29)

POVERTY | OpinionWhat Data Can Do To Fight Poverty (NYT, 1/29)


The Washingtonian presents a guide to successfully living in Washington, D.C.

– Ciara

Why buying a home is out of reach for many millennials in the Greater Washington region

HOUSING 
Despite a continuously growing population and relatively strong economy, one writer explores why it remains so difficult for workers – particularly millennial workers – to afford homeownership in the Greater Washington region. (WaPo, 1/4)

In the Washington region, officials are always lobbying to bring large companies and their workforce to the area — often with great success — leaving us in what seems like a regular housing shortage and subsequently an overwhelmed infrastructure that hasn’t been adequate for our population since the early 1980s.  On top of that, I can rattle off the names of 10 large universities in the area that supply a huge 20-something-year-old population year after year — many of whom stay put after graduation and get apartments.  Oh, I haven’t even mentioned the federal government or the military, which, as everyone knows, is a huge and stable (sans a government shutdown) slice of the workforce.

So that means we need housing — lots of housing. But the influx of new construction has not led to a great rise in the home ownership rate in Washington. So what gives?

VIRGINIA | Alison Silberberg will be sworn in as the new mayor of Alexandria with plans to limit development in the jurisdiction. (WaPo, 1/3)

HEALTHCARE 
– A new primary care office in D.C. aims to offer its patients dietary prescriptions in place of medication to cure what ails them. (WBJ, 12/2015)

Construction projects to dominate Greater Washington health care news in 2016 (WBJ, 12/2015)

ARTS
–  2016  is gearing up to be an exciting year for museums in the city. Check out what’s on the horizon for the new year. (WaPo, 12, 2015)

With millennial philanthropy money flowing, arts groups miss out (Seattle Times, 12, 2015)

WORKFORCE | As we usher in a new year, more than a dozen states will also be ushering in higher minimum wages. Advocates and skeptics alike will be on the lookout for how the changes affect workers. (Atlantic, 1/1)


Though 2015 is long gone, take this quiz to test your knowledge of the year in D.C.

– Ciara

Friday roundup – September 14 through September 18, 2015

THIS WEEK IN PHILANTHROPY
 Consumer Health Foundation president and CEO Yanique Redwood discussed how foundations and social profit organizations can transform communities by spending in them. (CHF, 9/16)

Exponent Philanthropy shared how thinking more like a designer may be a great method to apply to the field of philanthropy. (PhilanthroFiles, 9/17)

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH
– Dr. Alvin Crawley, Alexandria City Public Schools superintendent, explained why integrating health and wellness goals into the day-to-day activities at schools is so important for staff and students over on Northern Virginia Health Foundation‘s blog. (NVHF, 9/16)

 Proportion of Americans without health insurance dropped in 2014 (WaPo, 9/16)

THIS WEEK IN SOCIAL JUSTICE/RACIAL JUSTICE
– Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates explored African American families in the age of mass incarceration. (Atlantic, 10/2015)

THIS WEEK IN THE WORKFORCE/REGION
– Washington Business Journal compiled a list of the top 20 fastest-growing jobs in the region. Personal care aides topped the list with a 29% average annual rate of change in the number of jobs available in the region from 2009-2014. (WBJ, 9/15)


Can you guess whether these crazy menu items are real or fake?

– Ciara

Washington AIDS Partnership honored for their work in the fight to end AIDS

HIV/AIDS
Last night, the Washington AIDS Partnership (WAP) was recognized by DC Appleseed for their work in the fight to end AIDS in the District. Beginning in 2015, WAP embarked on a new initiative with DC Appleseed, local experts, and the D.C. government to create a plan which would identify barriers to end HIV/AIDS, gaps in services and infrastructure, and capacity needs among community-based organizations. At the event, both D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and Dr. Anthony Fauci from the National Institutes of Health spoke to the need for D.C. to set the example for the rest of the nation and end the epidemic in the city. Within the District, 80 percent of individuals are linked to care within three months of testing positive for HIV, 62 percent are retained in care, and 40 percent are virally suppressed. These numbers are above the national averages for HIV care; however, WAP, DC Appleseed, and the D.C. government are committed to bringing the number of individuals linked and retained in care to 90 percent by the year 2020. WAP will continue to fund and support innovative programs that look to treat, prevent, and educate individuals in D.C. about HIV in an effort to bring the epidemic to an end in the city.

POVERTY/WORKFORCE
– New data on income and poverty in 2014 by the Census Bureau finds income growth, wage growth, and poverty rates remained unchanged from 2013. (NPR, 9/16)

– Mapping the Difference Between Minimum Wage and Cost of Living (City Lab, 9/10)

HEALTH/YOUTH | In a new blog post for the Northern Virginia Health Foundation, Alexandria City Public Schools (ACPS) superintendent Dr. Alvin Crawley  explains why integrating health and wellness goals into the day-to-day activities at schools, just as ACPS plans to do beginning this fall, is so vital for staff and students alike. (NVHF, 9/16)

PHILANTHROPY | Check out how thinking more like a designer may be a great method to apply to the field of philanthropy over at Exponent Philanthropy‘s blog. (PhilanthroFiles, 9/17)

EDUCATION/VIRGINIA | Opinion: As Fairfax County Public Schools face severe budget cuts, officials of the nation’s 10th largest school system with 190,000 students, discuss what under-funding could mean for the very near future. (WaPo, 9/17)

FOOD | A study from the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity examines the dietary habits of Americans and finds that there is a growing gap in the dietary quality of wealthier people and people in poverty. (WaPo, 9/17)

DISTRICT/ECONOMY | D.C.’s ward 8 will soon see a big public investment in the form of a new sports and entertainment complex on the St. Elizabeths East campus. (WBJ, 9/16)


When it comes to autumn, Denali Park just “gets it.”

– Ciara 

Number of homeless public school students doubles nationwide

HOMELESSNESS/EDUCATION
Nationwide, the number of homeless children in public schools has doubled to a record 1.36 million during the 2013-2014 school year. The impact is severe on public schools throughout the country and in the region, as they struggle to address the challenges facing students. (WaPo, 9/14)

Homeless children are more likely to be diagnosed with learning disabilities, are more likely to miss school and change schools, are more likely to drop out of school than other children and score lower on standardized tests.

It is not just urban school systems that grapple with homelessness; the problem extends to rural and suburban communities, especially as the revitalization of cities has forced low-income families to look for cheaper housing elsewhere.

POVERTY
– In Prince George’s County, the Circuit Court has undertaken some reforms to the ways in which companies can petition to purchase structured settlement payments from individuals who are often vulnerable to the lure of fast money through lump sum payments – even when they stand to lose out on much of the funds awarded to them. Many of the cases involve victims who received settlements because they were exposed to lead poisoning. (WaPo, 9/13)

Who’s in Poverty? The Census Bureau’s Getting Better at Telling Us (WSJ,9/15)

WORKFORCE/REGION
– Washington Business Journal compiled a list of the top 20 fastest-growing jobs in the region. Personal care aides came in at number one with a 29% average annual rate of change in the number of jobs available in the area from 2009-2014. (WBJ, 9/15)

Related: A few years back, WRAG members interested in how best to support the region’s aging population presented a learning series on strengthening the direct care workforce, which includes personal care aides. As the need for high quality and affordable caregiving grows, it is critically important that direct caregiving be transformed into a sustainable and high quality career opportunity. Check out this edition of What Funders Need to Know to learn more.

– D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has announced new initiatives that would  provide job-readiness training for inmates and returning citizens in an effort to assist them in their transition back into society. (WaPo, 9/14)

HOUSING
– Hola Cultura, a social profit organization, presents a special series on D.C. Latino history and how housing has played a significant role in where Latinos have lived in D.C. since  1970. Information was compiled using tools to map Census data, investigating affordable housing programs and policies, and by conducting oral histories with local Latino residents. (Hola Cultura, 9/2015)

In Alexandria, a choice of historic preservation or affordable housing (WaPo, 9/12)

FOOD | A new study finds that, although nearly one in seven U.S. households is food insecure, only 61% of eligible households take advantage of programs such as WIC, SNAP, and free school meals. About 10 million students who qualify for free school breakfasts don’t eat it. (HuffPo, 9/10)


This week, we celebrate the 30th anniversary of a television show – nay, a cultural institution – known as The Golden Girls. Find out if you’re a Blanche, Dorothy, Rose, or Sophia

– Ciara

A strong need for an affordable housing plan in Alexandria

AFFORDABLE HOUSING/VIRGINIA
Officials in Alexandria, Virginia came together this week to discuss the pressing need for more affordable housing in the city. Outside of funding woes, they agreed that there are a number of barriers to solving the problem around housing in the area. (Connection, 8/5)

According to a local Department of Social Services Report for 2014 […] 12,916 Alexandrians, or 9 percent of the local population live in poverty in Alexandria. 3,921 children, 15 percent of children in Alexandria, live in poverty. While this is slightly lower than the 15.7 percent of children across the state living in poverty, it’s higher than the 9.6 percent throughout Northern Virginia.

But in many cases, more funding towards affordable housing is just part of the problem. Carter Batey, chair of the Social Services Advisory Board, said language and culture can often be a barrier to helping some who qualify for affordable housing to actively seek it. Alan Dinsmore, also from the Commission on Aging, said he’s experienced this firsthand in trying to get the city’s Hispanic immigrants enrolled into affordable housing programs, whom he said often have a very different interpretation of “independent living” programs. According to Batey and others at the meeting, illegal immigrants in Alexandria often believe law enforcement will use social services programs to arrest and deport them.

CHILDREN/YOUTH
Zero to Three, a national organization focused on improving the lives of infants, presents new data on the health, family structure, and early education experiences of infants and toddlers in all 50 states and the District through a series of fact sheets.

Zero to Three’s State Baby Facts provide a snapshot of how very young children are faring in each state and the District of Columbia. The fact sheets help us understand what it is like to be a very young child in each state and the important resources that can change the future life course for the many children who are not getting off to the best start. These fact sheets present infant and toddler data in the framework of good health, strong families, and positive early learning experiences and provide a comparison to national averages.

REGIONGreater Greater Washington takes a deeper look at plans for Seven Corners’ forthcoming redevelopment. (GGW, 8/5)

PHILANTHROPY/SOCIAL PROFITS | Opinion: Black Lives Matter Offers Lessons for Many Nonprofits and Foundations (Chronicle, 8/6)


Your preference for one of these two scenic photos can reveal a lot about your personality.

-Ciara