Federal workers who live in some parts of Greater Washington affected by the shutdown more than others

SHUTDOWN
– Federal workers who live in Southeast DC, Prince George’s County, or the outer suburbs, may be among those most affected by the ongoing government shutdown. According to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, half of federal workers in those areas earn less than $75,000 a year. (WAMU, 1/14)

About 360,000 federal workers live in the broader Washington region, and roughly 40 percent of those — or 145,000 workers — have been furloughed since December, according to Stephen Fuller, an economist at George Mason University. “The people that tend to get hurt are at the lower end of the wage spectrum or small businesses — people that just don’t have a whole lot of backup or alternatives” said Fuller.

– In response to the partial government shutdown, the Greater Washington Community Foundation announced they are dedicating $50,000 for emergency cash and food relief for local workers, contractors, and small business owners. The funds are being made available through the Resilience Fund. GWCF also has an extensive list of resources for furloughed federal employees and contractors on their website, including resources and support from the United Way of the National Capital Area, Pepco, Washington Gas, Bank of America, and Wells Fargo.

Related: During the shutdown of 2013, WRAG’s president Tamara Copeland wrote a column about why philanthropy, though critically important in helping to meet emergency needs, cannot replace government. That certainly continues to hold true today. (Daily, 10/2013)

CENSUS | The government is fighting a lawsuit filed by the NAACP that argues that, due to funding cuts, the 2020 Census is likely to massively undercount African Americans and other people of color, which will result in a loss of federal funding and Congressional representation (AP, 1/15)

HEALTH/RACIAL EQUITY | On January 28 lawmakers in the District will hold a public hearing to look at city response failures to surging heroin deaths in African American neighborhoods, and to determine strategies for combating the opioid epidemic. (WaPo, 1/11)

POVERTY/HOUSINGOpinion: Opportunity Zones: Can a tax break for rich people really help poor people? (WaPo, 1/14)

NONPROFITS | BoardSource is accepting applications for the 2019 Stand for Your Mission Award, recognizing nonprofit boards that have established advocacy as an expectation for engaged and effective board leadership. Proposals due: 2/1/19


Did you enjoy the snow this weekend? Lots of people seemed to, including those who took part in a massive snowball fight organized by the Washington, D.C. Snowball Fight Association near the Washington Monument – who knew??

– Buffy