The challenge of rapid rehousing in the second most expensive rental market in the country

HOMELESSNESS | The District is changing policies and offering incentives to entice landlords to participate in the rapid rehousing program, part of a concerted effort on the part of the Gray administration to get homeless families out of hotels and the shelter at D.C. General. The big question is whether people will be able to pay their rent after their subsidies from the city run out. Some homeless advocates are concerned (CP, 4/16):

According to a recent study by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, a D.C. resident making minimum wage needs to work 137 hours per week—or nearly 20 hours a day, seven days a week—to afford fair-market rent for a two-bedroom apartment. [Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless attorney Will] Merrifield argues that rapid rehousing might make sense for employed individuals, but that “to try to plug everyone into this program is insane.”

“Where I don’t see it working is for families that are going to be a single mom working one or two minimum-wage jobs that are going to be put in an apartment that’s $1,400, $1,500, $1,600 a month, and then falling off a cliff when the six months is up and the rapid rehousing runs out,” Merrifield says. “There’s no way that that can be successful in my opinion.”

Which leads us to…

HOUSING | In the ranking for most expensive rental market, D.C. is second only to Hawaii. (WTOP, 4/17) Where, presumably, a rental unit comes with a beach view.

YOUTH | A new resource map from the DC Alliance of Youth Advocates, produced in partnership with the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, traces the various funding streams going toward services for disconnected youth in D.C. DCAYA has an overview of the findings about gaps and opportunities to better target investments toward disconnected youth on their blog. The full resource map can be found here. (DCAYA, 4/16)

ARTS | The National Endowment for the Arts announced their latest round of grants yesterday, $2.5 million of which is going to 30 D.C. organizations. Here’s the list. (CP, 4/16)

HEALTHCARE |  DC extends deadline to enroll in health plans (WTOP, 4/17)

EDUCATION | The College Board has released sample questions from the new SAT exam, which will be better aligned with the Common Core standards. (WaPo, 4/16) I got butterflies and my palms started to sweat a little when I saw the math question on the front page of the Post yesterday.

NONPROFITS | Analysis: Looking At The Gender Wage Gap At Non-Profits In D.C. (WAMU, 4/16)

DISTRICT | After Six Years, D.C. To Get Six More Months To Debate Zoning Code Rewrite (WAMU, 4/16)

REGION | D.C. And Maryland Decriminalize Marijuana, But Differently (WAMU, 4/15)


Peeps! (…and a whole lot of ad videos. Thanks, Washington Post)

The (Almost) Daily will be back on Monday. Along with, I hope, spring.

– Rebekah