Monday, March 12 – In the News…

HEALTH
[DC] D.C. Health Department to aid community HIV/AIDS programs (Examiner, 3/12)
The department joins forces with grassroots groups in wards 7 and 8, providing grants of $20,000 and $50,000. D.C. has the highest AIDS rate in the country.

[MD] House Delegation Backs Tax for Hospital Bailout (WaPo, 3/10)
Property tax would help bail out Prince George’s Hospital Center.

[MD] Children and Working Families Healthcare Act Nears House Vote (WaPo, 3/10)
Bill would use tobacco tax to fund healthcare for 250,000 uninsured residents.

DC VOTING RIGHTS
Public supportive, but lacking in enthusiasm (WaPo, 3/11)

PHILANTHROPY
Paying Money to Donate Money (WSJ, 3/9)
Charity advisers multiply…

FROM THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
By RACHEL EMMA SILVERMAN
March 9, 2007

How hard can it be to give money away?

Pretty tough, actually. Now that donors have more charities to choose from, as well as more financial instruments with which to give away their dollars, wealthy philanthropists are increasingly hiring outside advisers to help. Those advisers can identify causes, vet charities and measure donors’ bang for the buck.

Donor consulting is a growing business. Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors in New York says its staff grew to 32 employees in 2006, from 15 when it was founded in 2002; it advised on $137 million in grants last year, up from $30 million in 2002. Geneva Global in Wayne, Pa., which focuses on initiatives in impoverished countries, helped clients give out $23.2 million in grants last year, up from $600,000 five years earlier. Atlanta-based Calvin Edwards & Co. has grown to 12 employees from one in 2001, while Arabella Philanthropic Investment Advisors, founded two years ago in Washington, D.C., is expanding to a new office in Chicago this week because of growing demand.